Snow

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Overview


Snow White, Rose Red


In a tiny Welsh estate, a duke and duchess lived happily, lacking only a child — or, more importantly, a son and heir to the estate. Childbirth ultimately proved fatal for the young duchess. After she died, the duke was dismayed to discover that he was not only a widower, but also father to a tiny baby girl. He vowed to begin afresh with a new wife, abandoning his daughter in search of elusive contentment.

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Craft, Kinuko Y New York, NY 2003 Mass-market paperback New in new dust jacket. Mass market (rack) paperback. Glued binding. 224 p. Audience: Children/juvenile; Young adult.

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Overview


Snow White, Rose Red


In a tiny Welsh estate, a duke and duchess lived happily, lacking only a child — or, more importantly, a son and heir to the estate. Childbirth ultimately proved fatal for the young duchess. After she died, the duke was dismayed to discover that he was not only a widower, but also father to a tiny baby girl. He vowed to begin afresh with a new wife, abandoning his daughter in search of elusive contentment.

Independent — virtually ignored — and finding only little animals and a lonely servant boy as her companions, Jessica is pale, lonely and headstrong...and quick to learn that she has an enemy in her stepmother. "Snow," as she comes to be known, flees the estate to London and finds herself embraced by a band of urban outcasts. But her stepmother isn't finished with her, and if Jessica doesn't take control of her destiny, the wicked witch will certainly harness her youth — and threaten her very life....

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Lynn's first novel is a rather meandering story inspired by Snow White. When a Welsh duke loses his wife in childbirth, he takes little interest in his daughter, Jessica, who spends her days happily helping the cook or playing with the servants' children. Enter the evil stepmother ("The crowd parted for just a moment, and in the middle was the most beautiful, tall, and stately woman Jessica had ever seen, as regal and pale as an ice queen"). The new duchess agrees to be patron to Alan, a young fiddler, in return for his services, which include taking the place of the talking mirror. He holds the mirror and responds to her query about who is fairest, and an enchanted necklace she gives him ensures the desired answer. Here things grow a bit muddled: the necklace also supposedly prevents him from discussing with others his conversations with the duchess. Yet Alan tells Jessica about the exotic herbs he gathers for the woman, and is able to write about her odd requests. The narrative shifts among various perspectives, includes intermittent "interludes," plus letters from Alan to his family, and a book of hours, which further distance readers from the action. Other strange developments: Jessica flees to London, where "the Lonely Ones" replace the Seven Dwarves; the half-animal creatures live as pickpockets in a basement "hideout." Snow's awakening from her deep sleep is decidedly unromantic: to revive her, one of the Lonely Ones places on her lips a "corroded copper wire" that is attached to a magical machine. Ages 14-up. (Mar.) Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information.
KLIATT
An intriguing Snow White retelling, set in late Victorian Wales and touched by steampunk, is marred by sloppy history. Snow White is Lady Jessica, only child of the Duke of Kenigh, but not his heir. Her wicked stepmother is a budding scientist, embittered by a misogynistic society that forces her to remain beautiful and produce a male child. There are no dwarves; instead Jessica finds refuge with the Lonely Ones, five outcast human/animal hybrids, pickpockets in the London slums. An interesting blend of magic and Victorian science brings matters to a pleasurable end. But the truly satisfying conclusion is weakened by anachronistic idiom and perspective, stylistic slippage, and downright historical inaccuracies (Jessica, for example, is incorrectly referred to throughout as a potential duchess). The placement of the fairy tale in recent history is clever, as is the take on magical science, but others do it better. KLIATT Codes: JS—Recommended for junior and senior high school students. 2003, Simon & Schuster, Simon Pulse, 259p.,
— Deborah Kaplan
VOYA
The story of Snow White seems to permit infinite variations, the latest of which is offered here. Jessica grows up motherless on an isolated Welsh manor. Her stepmother, Anne, a frustrated would-be scientist, becomes obsessed with having an heir and devises a lethal fertility spell involving Jessica's heart. Escaping to London, Snow-so nicknamed for her pale, ethereal appearance-takes up with "the Lonely Ones," a band of half-human, half-animal outcasts. Readers will not be surprised to learn, however, that Snow's stepmother has another card to play, one that threatens both Snow and her new companions. The writing by this first-time novelist is sometimes grammatically and stylistically awkward-"all of the older kids never hung out with... the younger ones."-and better editing would have pointed out that a duchess is the wife of a duke, not the daughter. The action tends to lurch from setting to setting and from voice to voice. Lynn tries to promote feminism, for example, in Anne's bitterness at society's strictures on women, but succeeds only in sounding artificial and preachy. As for her attempt to rehabilitate the wicked stepmother-please! Nevertheless, readers who loved Gail Levine's Ella Enchanted (HarperCollins, 1997/VOYA August 1997) might find this novel entertaining, and it is a step on the way to more sophisticated revisits to fairy tales by Robin McKinley and Donna Jo Napoli or a modern British Snow White with the seven "dwarves" as a rock band, in Adèle Geras's Pictures of the Night (Harcourt, 1993). Fans of the genre will be happy to overlook a few literary weaknesses in favor of a fresh twist on an old story. VOYA CODES: 3Q 3P M J (Readable without serious defects; Willappeal with pushing; Middle School, defined as grades 6 to 8; Junior High, defined as grades 7 to 9). 2003, Simon & Schuster, 224p,
— Kathleen Beck
School Library Journal
Gr 8 Up-Jessica grows up in a remote estate in Wales, ignored by a father who still mourns the wife who died in childbirth. When the girl's treacherous stepmother's jealousy reaches a fever pitch, she escapes to a London full of Dickensian scenes and a den of "lonely ones." The parallels to the tale of "Snow White," psychologically complex characters, and a fast-moving plot make this a thoroughly compelling read. Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780689855566
  • Publisher: Simon Pulse
  • Publication date: 2/18/2003
  • Format: Mass Market Paperback
  • Edition description: First Simon Pulse Edition
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 224
  • Age range: 14 - 17 Years
  • Product dimensions: 4.30 (w) x 7.10 (h) x 0.70 (d)

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 59 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(33)

4 Star

(9)

3 Star

(12)

2 Star

(3)

1 Star

(2)

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 91 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2007

    Really didn't like the book - wish I'd put it down in the beginning

    Overall I disliked this book a LOT. It kept me entertained enough to keep reading, but barely. The author is clearly skilled in language, but her writing still needs a lot of refining. The sentences didn't flow very well, there was a lot of confusing transition from narration to characters' thoughts, and oftentimes, in the middle of narration appropriate to what it would be like in the 1800s, I would come upon a modern phrase that definitely didn't belong. The story was lacking in good description of its characters and left me wanting more effective description everywhere. The storyline would sometimes start quickly and go very fast, but then stop and be slow, and then start again suddenly. I felt like I was being pulled along in a car that kept hitting its brakes and then accelerating at odd intervals. The main character of Jessica/Snow really had no personality, which is the key to getting readers to like a character. I found that I didn't really like her or care about her that much, cruel as it seems. Creating likeable characters is essential for an author to accomplish to keep a reader hooked. When Jessica was young she just seemed silly, and when she was old, she was boring and, in some instances, still silly. The love story that unravelled leads me back to the car analogy, with the stopping and going suddenly and erratically. The author would lead me to believe that certain characters would be love interests for Snow, but then suddenly those ideas would be dashed and I'd be left saying, 'Wha-??'. The love story started out slow so you'd hardly know it was there, then all of a sudden it accelerated quickly and I was thinking, 'When did that happen?'. Characters were introduced suddenly when the book was almost over, and I thought they would be significant, but they really were annoyingly pointless. The author tried to have a modern take on the story, with the Duchess being a scientist instead of a witch, but the story seemed out of place and all wrong like this, and the 'scientific' elements of the story just seemed dumb and far-fetched. But enough of that. As I was reading the book I figured it deserved 3 stars in a review. That is, until I got to the end. All - and I mean ALL! - problems in the story seemed to be resolved with an infuriatingly low amount of conflict. Suddenly all seemed to be well, and I felt like throwing the book accross the room! The ending itself was completely lame, and left me wondering why on earth I didn't stop reading the book after the first few chapters. Perhaps I am hard to please, but I definitely don't recommend this book.

    10 out of 17 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 7, 2008

    A wonderful read!

    I fell absolutely in love with the book the first time I read it! The story was wonderful and the character development was top notch. I fell in love with the character Raven! This book is shrouded in mystery and has a bit of every genre in it. I recommend it to anyone who loves fairy tale retellings!

    4 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 10, 2008

    Incredible

    This is a super book it's one of those special books that you can read repeatedly, over and over again without getting tired of it. It's a beautiful Snow White story, and there's a wonderful romance between Snow and her 'Prince', the misfit-but-still-really-amazing Raven. This is a must read!

    4 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 3, 2008

    love at first word

    While trying to avoid gushing, i have to say that this is one of my favorite books i have read. My copy is so worn that i have been looking for a new one. The adventures snow goes on and the outstanding cast of supporting characters makes this read one for all to enjoy. The only thing i would say is that it isn't the garden variety fairy tale and some of the themes may not be suitable for all ages.

    4 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 27, 2007

    How Terrible!

    I didn't like this book at all! It really didnt have any magic in it at all. Like when Snow White woke up it wasnt a kiss that woke her up. It was just a machine that put her to sleep then it made her wake up. The first few chapters I liked it but then it got boring and stupid. Some of the books in these series are very disappointing. Some are really excellent. But all in all this was one of the bad ones.

    4 out of 7 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted January 25, 2013

    I really liked this retelling of Snow White. You could see the s

    I really liked this retelling of Snow White. You could see the similarities between this story and the original Snow White, but this one had a lot of originality that it kept me riveted.
    Snow—or rather, Jessica—is a child raised by servants. Since the servants obviously do not know how a proper duchess is to be raised, Jessica mostly runs wild among the estate. That is, until her father remarries. Everyone, including Jessica, is fooled by Anne, the new duchess, except for Alan, the fiddler. He is Anne's servant, and has an enchanted chain around his neck that prevents him from being able to tell anyone what goes on in Anne's room. Alan is also Jessica's best friend, and when Anne reveals her plan to steal Jessica's heart, Alan rushes—and struggles—to try and save Jessica without revealing anything.
    Then we meet the band of outcasts, Chauncey, Mouser, Sparrow, Cat, and Raven. They take Jessica in when they find her wandering on the streets of London, and quickly become her family.
    But then Anne claims to have changed, and Jessica—now known as Snow—who yearns to have a mother, is willing to give her a second chance. Here is where I had a bit of qualms with Snow.
    The duchess, Anne, tried to kill Snow. Yes, I understand that Snow wants parents who care for her more than anything, but Anne tried to kill her. I would not be willing to go back and say, "Oh, hi, I know you wanted my heart for yourself and all, but I'm just gonna go meet you and put it all behind us." What?
    Though I know it was essential for the plot, I still wanted to smack some sense into Snow and scream at her that it was a trap.
    The Lonely Ones (the band of outcasts that take Snow in) quickly captured my heart with their quirks and care. As they became Snow's adopted family, I came to care for them.
    Another thing I really liked was the way the author wrote the book. It was in third person, which allowed us to see what was going on everywhere and be privy to what the duchess was going to do (and then yell at Snow for being so naïve.) Also, some chapters were things that weren't essential to the book but that allowed us to see what other character's were thinking, such as Alan's letter to his sister after accepting the position as a fiddler in the Welsh estate.
    Though I knew (for the most part) how the story was going to end, it wasn't boring in the least and provided much entertainment that kept me wanting to know how the author planned to have things happen—and therefore kept me eagerly turning the page.
    I recommend this book to people who love retelling of fairy tales, love, magic (or science), and a happily ever after that's not so expected.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted June 18, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    One Lonely girl encounters other 'Lonelys' and learns what a real family feels like. Life may not be perfect but with good friends and love we can overcome anything, even a curse!

    Snow, born a duchess, is unsure of what life should and can hold until a fiddler, an insane stepmother, and group of unusual friends abruptly insert themselves into her life. One always wonders why Snow never rises up against her stepmother; well here readers are rewarded with a tale of pure hearts, and unfortunate circumstances that lands one very isolated little girl in the heart of London amidst a groups of siblings different from any characters ever encountered, retelling or not! Though far from home, insanity and danger follow this child even as she discovers family and, for the first time, love. An enchanting tale only possible from Ms. Lynn's imagination. Thank you for a wonderful adventure!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted January 18, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    Refreshing Retelling

    I really enjoyed the novel Snow by Tracy Lynn. Although it's a retelling of a beloved fairy tale, the characters are unique and the mysteries original. The main character, Jessica was born the day her mother died. Her father, the Duke of Kenigh, is heartbroken by his wife's death. He shuns Jessica because she is not a male heir and he blames her for her mother's death. Jessica is raised by the servants, running wild and happy. Then the duke remarries and Snow has a new mother, a haughty beautiful lady. Jessica's freedom is slowly taken away, but at first the new duchess was kind. There were only hints of her strangeness. The duchess works secretively in her labratory and is dangerously obsessed with having a son. The duchess hires a fiddler boy, Alan, as her servant and he and Jessica become friends. It's apparent that the duchess has some hold over Alan, and there are some things he's just unable to speak about. As her stepmother's experiments grow more sinister, Jessica becomes lovelier... and her stepmother grows jealous. Eventually Jessica is forced to flee for her life, taking on the new name Snow and hiding out in London. It's there that she meets the Lonely Ones... a truly strange group of people hidden from the rest of the world. This novel is well written and fast-paced. The setting of Victorian England jumps off the page. But what really holds your interest is Jessica. She's a determined main character who's not your typical damsel in distress. The ending is fully satisfying, with all the threads coming together and tying themselves up neatly.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 3, 2008

    Great

    I think the book was awesome! I can understand what people mean by say some of the phrases where out of place. But over all a very good read.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 6, 2007

    Disappointing, Unsatisfying

    Okay i really didnt like this book at all. I bought because I thought that it would be a decent book but it was very disappointing and i wanted to burn the book. It was out of what i have read of this series the worst. The author did not make the charater interesting. The romance was very dry and I dont think it really resembled Snow White.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 15, 2007

    This was an awesome story!

    this book was positively amazing. the story shows magic, romance, suspense, and adventure. i agree with the person who said that you fall in love with the characters because it's true. And at parts the book made me laugh. and for the person who said that there was no magic in her waking up. there really was. tracy lynn showed a new way of Snow White waking up from a kiss. trust me it is an amazing book. and if you like fairy tales put this on your list.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 16, 2007

    I loved it!

    There are so many surprising plot twists, and it isn't so girly as you might think it is. Couldn't put the book down. And as for Snow & Raven- at first it's all like, they're talking. Then, next minute, they're kissing. But really, if you read closely you'll pick up the small details and it'll totally pay off.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted August 6, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    Snow: A Retelling of Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs

    This is wonderfully rewritten and full of interesting characters and unexpected twists in the plot that will keep you wondering about what will happen next.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 22, 2011

    Jane Austen meets "Snow White"

    I've recently finished all of the books and so I've decided to review each of them in the following categories: story, characters, and my final comments. (Warning: Spoiler Alert on this whole review) (Story): Tracy Lynn's only novel in this series retells the "Snow White" story. While Jessica may be rich, young, and pretty, all her life her father has blatantly ignored her because her mother died giving birth to her. Her only family is in the servants who care for her. But when Jessica turns eleven, her father remarries. Duchess Anne of Mandagor is now her stepmother and is not only strict but odd. Her true colors get revealed when Jessica turns sixteen and discovers that she's fiercely envious of her. The following night, Jessica flees her home to the city of London, and changes her name to Snow. While in London, she meets not seven, but five of the most unique "dwarves" I have ever read about, and immediately bonds with them. Like I said before, this is Tracy Lynn's only novel in the series. And I wish she wrote more because her writing style gripped me from the first page. Her elaborate way of telling the story is perfect for the time period and the story itself. I'd love to read more from her. (Characters): Jessica is an interesting Snow White in that she's human. It would take a lot of courage to leave the only home you've ever known. I also completely felt for her when she got reprimanded for kicking a boy who was advancing inappropriately on her. Her love-interest, Raven, is interesting too in that he's one of the "dwarves" in the story but in a way he's also the prince. I could tell he really cared for her and wanted to be with her. Even the stepmother seemed human. As I read it, I understood why she became bitter and strict and almost felt sorry for her in a way. I like it when villains have a backstory of their own. (Final Comments): This is definitely one of the best in the series, and for anyone who loves "Snow White" I would highly recommend this.

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  • Posted November 10, 2010

    A DELIGHTFUL READ

    I REALLY ENJOYED READING THIS BOOK. IT WAS SO HARD FOR ME TO PUT IT DOWN. I LOVED HOW THEY MADE SEEM A LIL MORE REALISTIC W A FAIRY TALE TWIST. NOTHING LIKE THE DISNEY VERSION. WHICH I STILL LIKE BUT THE BOOK WAS JUST AS GOOD IF NOT BETTER.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 11, 2010

    Waste of A Read

    This book got inappropriate in the third chapter. The writing is BORING and honestly the Disney version is better.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted June 8, 2010

    Edgy and Interesting

    Although a bit unusual (the story's atmosphere was quite dark), I thought that "Snow" was the best re-tellings of Snow White that I've ever read. It's one that is easy to reread and also to enjoy. A great read for teenage girls.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 19, 2010

    I Also Recommend:

    AN AMAZING STORY

    I loved this book! i can read it over and over again and never get tired of it. This was the first book that i read from the ONCE UPON A TIME SERIES, and i loved the story. I have to read all of the books from this series!!!

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  • Posted April 5, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    Very good, but ends a little abruptly

    I really enjoyed the way Tracy Lynn interpreted various aspects of the "Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs" fairy tale---especially the dwarf characters---but while most of the story paced delicately from one moment to the next, the conclusion all but trampled to its end. I had a hundred questions about the resolution, and the slow-building romance present through most of the story seemed hurried, haphazard, and flat in the final scene. I wasn't looking for sentimental sighs, but a touch of poignancy, or a sense of rightness, of belonging, would've better matched the rest of the book. Still, this is definitely one of the more interesting and engaging in the Once Upon a Time series.

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  • Posted April 4, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    Awesome!

    This was my favorite book in the series so far! Raven was such a sweet heart!

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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