Snow White and Rose Red

Snow White and Rose Red

4.2 34
by Patricia C. Wrede
     
 

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Snow White and Rose Red live on the edge of the forest that conceals the elusive border of Faerie. They know enough about Faerie lands and mortal magic to be concerned when they find two human sorcerers setting spells near the border. And when the kindly, intelligent black bear wanders into their cottage some months later, they realize the connection between his

Overview

Snow White and Rose Red live on the edge of the forest that conceals the elusive border of Faerie. They know enough about Faerie lands and mortal magic to be concerned when they find two human sorcerers setting spells near the border. And when the kindly, intelligent black bear wanders into their cottage some months later, they realize the connection between his plight and the sorcery they saw in the forest. This romantic version of the classic fairy tale features an updated introduction by its editor, Terri Windling.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Wrede's ( Caught in Crystal ) romantic and charming retelling of the Brothers Grimm tale is the fourth in this series. In the village of Mortlak, near the river Thames, during the reign of Elizabeth I, live the Widow Arden and her two daughters, Blanche and Rosamund. The widow, who supports her family by selling herbs and making healing potions, lives in fear of being accused of witchcraft. Her daughters gather the herbs she needs, sometimes crossing into the realm of Faerie, one of whose borders lies in the forest nearby. Also residing in Mortlak is the real-life Doctor Dee, astrologer to the Queen, who with his friend Edward Kelly seeks to harness the magic of Faerie. Their efforts turn Hugh, one of the half-human sons of the queen of Faerie, into a bear. With the aid of the widow and her daughters, John, the elder Faerie prince, tries to disenchant his brother, who has crossed over to the mortal world. John is initially thwarted in his efforts by Madini, head of a faction in Faerie that seeks complete separation from the mortal domain. In putting her twist on the classic tale, Wrede uses language appropriate to the period and nicely evokes both medieval England and a magic land. ( May )
Children's Literature - Kathleen Karr
The Grimm Brothers probably wouldn't recognize Patricia C. Wrede's take on their venerable fairy tale. This is all to the good, because Wrede's retelling in novel form is considerably more entertaining than the original-being irresistibly witty, romantic, and more filled with happy endings than moral lessons. Shy Blanche and vivacious Rosamund live with their herbalist/healer mother, the Widow Arden, in Elizabethan England. Their tiny cottage borders on a great forest, which just happens to harbor the world of Faerie with its queen and court. Only 10 miles down the River Thames lies London, which harbors another queen and court. These parallel worlds are connected through the sorcery of John Dee, Queen Elizabeth's alchemist, and must be separated by the widow and her daughters before they are branded as witches. The fact that Dee and Kelly, his nefarious assistant, unknowingly present the marriageable young ladies with almost perfect suitor material (once one gets past the animal bridegroom issue) is part of the drollery. Wrede's use of the historical Dee is clever, while her use of the Elizabethan dialect is both clever and comfortably believable. It is a really good read, amplified by Terri Windling's excellent new introduction about the history of the fairy tale genre. Reviewer: Kathleen Karr

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780142411216
Publisher:
Penguin Young Readers Group
Publication date:
02/19/2009
Series:
Fairy Tales Series
Edition description:
Reprint
Pages:
288
Sales rank:
646,852
Product dimensions:
5.40(w) x 8.10(h) x 0.80(d)
Age Range:
12 Years

Meet the Author

Patricia C. Wrede lives in Edina, Minnesota.

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Snow White and Rose Red 4.2 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 34 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Wonderful. The little known fairy tale was refreshing. I love PCW's books! The language really helps bring the characters and era to life. Plus, since The Secrets of the Imortal Nicholas Flamel by Michael Scott, I love Dee.
bookaddictsguide More than 1 year ago
I read SNOW WHITE AND ROSE RED with Alyssa & Amy for our December On the Same Page read (it’s one of Alyssa’s favorites) and after not liking Amy’s favorite, I was terrified. I got a couple pages into the book and was like, “Holy cow. That’s a lot of thee & thou & thy.” But as I read on, it really wasn’t as daunting as it first seemed. I’m not used to the language so yes, it did affect my read a little bit because I had to concentrate more, but overall, the book was very enjoyable! SNOW WHITE AND ROSE RED is actually one fairy tale I remember reading as a kid (at least I THINK I read the original…) and it stuck out in my mind. I really enjoyed Patricia C. Wrede’s adaptation and how she changed the tale in little ways to make it her own story and these changes actually really helped me grow attached to the book too. I’m notoriously hesitant about fairy books but after falling in love with books like Heir of Fire and A Court of Thorns and Roses, I’m definitely coming around so I was so happy to see that not only was it something that I wasn’t afraid of in SWRR but also something that I enjoyed. I loved the characters and they totally made the book for me. They were SO much fun with so much personality. I’m glad I was pushed to read this one with Alyssa & Amy because I would not have done it without them!
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I was disappointed in this read. For a fairy tale with witches and magicians, it felt like a magicless read. The author's choice to write in an Elizabethan manner made it difficult to fully immerse myself or connect to the characters. I had to spend too much time using context clues to figure out what the characters were saying. I couldn't love the villains or the good guys.
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slimikin More than 1 year ago
I'm not someone who really likes or feels the need to reread books, but Snow White and Rose Red is definitely an exception. There's so much to enjoy in Patricia C. Wrede's retelling of the fairy tale: the relationship between brothers and between sisters; the day-to-day details of Elizabethan England; Faerie lands with haughty, disdainful faerie folk; plots interwoven within plots; romance; a cameo by Robin Goodfellow, aka, Puck; historical figures turned villains; and bears. Well, *a* bear, anyway. But when that bear is a half-human, half-faerie man ensorcelled into the shape of a bear, one is all you really need. Every reread is a rediscovery of all that I love about the book, and for days afterward I'm known to long for a bear to appear on my doorstep.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Carissima17 More than 1 year ago
This rendition of Snow White and Rose Red is excellently written. The ideas and characters are well thought out and very engrossing. Patricia Wrede is a magical writer with an excellent sense of storytelling.