The Snowman (Harry Hole Series #7)

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Overview

One night, after the first snowfall of the year, a boy named Jonas wakes up and discovers that his mother has disappeared. Only one trace of her remains: a pink scarf, his Christmas gift to her, now worn by the snowman that inexplicably appeared in their yard earlier that day.  Inspector Harry Hole suspects a link between the missing woman and a suspicious letter he’s received. The case deepens when a pattern emerges: over the past decade, eleven women have vanished—all on the day of the first snow. But this...
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The Snowman (Harry Hole Series #7)

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Overview

One night, after the first snowfall of the year, a boy named Jonas wakes up and discovers that his mother has disappeared. Only one trace of her remains: a pink scarf, his Christmas gift to her, now worn by the snowman that inexplicably appeared in their yard earlier that day.  Inspector Harry Hole suspects a link between the missing woman and a suspicious letter he’s received. The case deepens when a pattern emerges: over the past decade, eleven women have vanished—all on the day of the first snow. But this is a killer who makes his own rules . . . and he’ll break his pattern just to keep the game interesting, as he draws Harry ever closer into his twisted web. With brilliantly realized characters and hair-raising suspense, international bestselling author Jo Nesbø presents his most chilling case yet—one that will test Harry Hole to the very limits of his sanity.
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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
“Jo Nesbø is my new favorite thriller writer and Harry Hole my new hero.” —Michael Connelly

“Fiendishly complex and terrifically entertaining.” —The New York Times Book Review

“If you don’t know Nesbø, it’s time to get with it.” —USA Today

“Nesbø explores the darkest criminal minds with grim delight and puts his killers where you least expect to find them. . . . His novels are maddeningly addictive.” —Vanity Fair
 
“A superb thriller—smart, stylish, beautifully paced and meticulously plotted.”  —Newsday

The Snowman is strung together with great care, playful in certain stretches, grisly in others, all of it highly readable.”—Newsweek
 
“The writer most likely to take the ice-cold crown in the critically acclaimed—and now bestselling—category of Nordic noir.” —Los Angeles Times
 
“Nesbø's books have a serious, socially significant heft, as well as a confident (even cocky) narrative stride that is unmatched. These aren’t mere investigatory trifles to be enjoyed and forgotten; their unnerving horrors linger.” —Richmond Times-Dispatch
 
“Nesbø’s pace is unerring, and the way he builds up suspense will incite Pavlovian page-turning.” —Time Out New York
 
“This is reading as you experienced it in childhood, without any gap between eye and mind, but with the added pleasures that adult plots and adult characters can bring. . . . Unputdownable. The Snowman is probably the most terrifying and certainly the most addictive book in the whole series.” —Slate
 
“This is crime writing of the highest order, in which the characters are as strong as the story, where an atmosphere of evil permeates, and the tension begins in the first chapter and never lets up.” —The Times (London)
 
“Spine-chilling. . . . This most ambitious of Nesbø’s crime novels banishes any fears that the omniscient serial killer scenario has been exhausted.” —The Independent (London)
 
“Macabre and disturbing. . . . Deft plotting, strong characterization, adrenaline-fuelled action sequences and a whole raft of social issues raised along the way make this book a spectacularly good example of how a tried and tested (and often tired) formula can be made exhilarating and fresh.” —The Guardian (London)
 
“Hole is all a fictional detective should be.” —Times Literary Supplement
 
“If you’re still grieving the loss of Stieg Larsson, it’s time to move on. Nesbø’s waiting for you.” —Milwaukee Journal Sentinel

 
 

Marilyn Stasio
…a fiendishly complex and terrifically entertaining plot…Nesbo has a horrormeister's flair for transforming natural scenes into ominous situations…
—The New York Times
Publishers Weekly
In this chilling installment in Nesbø's Insp. Harry Hole crime series (The Devil's Star, etc.), a snowman left in the front yard of Birte Becker's Oslo house is the only clue to the woman's disappearance. When Sylvia Ottersen disappears from her farmhouse soon afterward, the snowman the killer leaves behind has a gruesome addition: Sylvia's severed head. Harry, aided by Katrine Bratt, a brash new member of his team with secrets of her own, combs through past missing person cases, looking for other victims of the killer now dubbed the Snowman. Several months earlier, Harry received an anonymous letter referring to both snowmen and the Australian serial killer he'd pursued early in his career. What appeared random and bizarre then now takes on new meaning as Harry realizes the killer is taunting him. Nesbø breathes new life into the serial killer subgenre, giving it a Norwegian twist and never losing his laconic hero in the process. 150,000 first printing; 6-city author tour. (May)
Library Journal
Norwegian detective Harry Hole is in a quandary—he's an expert on serial killers in a country that prides itself on not having any. Yet women are being murdered on the day of the first snowfall, their bodies enmeshed with or guarded by eerily watchful snowmen. Hole has to convince his peers that the murders are the work of a serial killer, so he tracks The Snowman. But soon questions arise—who is stalking whom? And for what purpose? Nesbø (The Devil's Star; Nemesis; The Redbreast) is also a musician and composer. His latest thriller reads like a symphony, from the thundering first chords that pull the reader into a magical world through the delicately enticing development in which motifs and story strands are woven together leading to a pounding, furious conclusion. VERDICT Nesbø is being hailed as the next Stieg Larsson or Henning Mankell; this work is being compared to Peter Høeg's Smilla's Sense of Snow, among others. Apt comparisons, but they don't go far enough. This is simply the best detective novel this reviewer has read in years. [See Prepub Alert, 11/1/10; 150,000-copy first printing; six-city tour.]—David Clendinning, West Virginia State Univ. Lib., Institute
Kirkus Reviews

Erica Jong meets Stephen King meets, yes, Stieg Larsson in this superb thriller, the eighth by Norwegian mystery writer Nesbø.

Oslo detective Harry Hole returns, world-weary as ever, to puzzle out some very strange, and very discomfiting, events. The opening is very Scandinavian indeed: two people not married to each other are experiencing some extracurricular bliss—the Erica Jong part—when one notices that they're being watched, whereupon the woman's kid, waiting in a car in the wintry outside—the Scandinavian part—informs his mom, "We're going to die"—and not just because Ronald Reagan has just been elected. The thing is, it's a snowman that's doing the watching, and from that fact no good thing can emerge. Nesbø is to be complimented: It's one of the creepiest opening scenes in recent memory, even if the lovemaking has a sort of late-1970s West German soft-porn feel to it. Fast-forward 24 years, when the Norwegians are worried about Dubya, and Hole is on the case of more snowman hijinks, helped along by his fellow officers of the Politioverbetjent (the Crime Squad, that is), one of whom is "attractive without trying" and makes a fine lure for mayhem. Things get creepier as the scene shifts from substation to plastic surgeon's office to coroner's gurney, when Harry announces, "I just have the feeling that someone is watching me the whole time, that someone is watching me now. I'm part of someone's plan." So he is, and the story resolves with a nice edgy twist that would do Larsson proud. Harry is pleasingly human, with a capacity for hard, grueling work being one of his best features, and the rest of the characters say and do believable things, the murderous snowman notwithstanding. The Norwegian settings are sometimes exotic, sometimes just grimy—who knew that Oslo had a high-crime area?—but always appropriate to the story, which unfolds at just the right pace.

The smart, suspenseful cat-and-mouse game will remind some readers of Erik Skjoldbjærg's 1997 filmInsomnia—and that's high praise indeed.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780307742995
  • Publisher: Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group
  • Publication date: 4/17/2012
  • Series: Harry Hole Series , #7
  • Pages: 512
  • Sales rank: 59,096
  • Product dimensions: 5.10 (w) x 7.90 (h) x 1.00 (d)

Meet the Author

Jo Nesbo
Jo Nesbø is a musician, songwriter, economist, and author. The first crime novel in his Inspector Harry Hole series was published in Norway in 1997, an instant hit, winning the Glass Key Award for best Nordic crime novel (an accolade shared with Stieg Larsson and Henning Mankell). He also established the Harry Hole Foundation, a charity to reduce illiteracy among children in the third world. He lives in Oslo.
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Read an Excerpt

Day 3

The Pit

“Was that great or what?”

Oleg’s enthusiastic voice drowned out the spitting fat in the kebab shop, which was crowded with people after the concert at the Oslo Spektrum. Harry nodded to Oleg, who was standing in his hoodie, still sweaty, still moving to the beat as he prattled on about the members of Slipknot by name, names Harry didn’t even know since Slipknot CDs were sparing with personal data, and music magazines like MOJO and Uncut didn’t write about bands like that. Harry ordered hamburgers and looked at his watch. Rakel had said she would be standing outside at ten o’clock. Harry looked at Oleg again. He was talking nonstop.

When had it happened? When had the boy turned eleven and decided to like music about various stages of death, alienation, freezing and general doom? Perhaps it ought to have worried Harry, but it didn’t. It was a starting point, a curiosity that had to be satisfied, clothes the boy had to try on to see if they fit. Other things would come along. Better things. Worse things.

“You liked it, too, didn’t you, Harry?”

Harry nodded. He didn’t have the heart to tell him the concert had been a bit of an anticlimax for him. He couldn’t put his finger on what it was; perhaps it just wasn’t his night. As soon as they had joined the crowd in the Spektrum, he had felt the paranoia that used to regularly accompany drunkenness but that during the last year had come when he was sober. And instead of getting into the mood, he had had the feeling he was being observed, and stood scanning the audience, studying the wall of faces around them.

“Slipknot rules,” Oleg said. “And the masks were übercool. Especially the one with the long, thin nose. It looked like a . . . sort of . . . ”

Harry was listening with half an ear, hoping Rakel would come soon. The air inside the kebab shop suddenly felt dense and suffocating, like a thin film of grease lying on your skin and over your mouth. He tried not to think his next thought. But it was on its way, had already rounded the corner. The thought of a drink.

“It’s an Indian death mask,” a woman’s voice behind them said.

“And Slayer was better than Slipknot.”

Harry spun around in surprise.

“Lots of posing with Slipknot, isn’t there?” she continued. “Recycled ideas and empty gestures.”

She was wearing a shiny, figure-hugging, ankle-length black coat buttoned up to her neck. All you could see under the coat was a pair of black boots. Her face was pale and her eyes made up.

“I would never have believed it,” Harry said. “You liking that kind of music.”

Katrine Bratt managed a brief smile. “I suppose I would say the opposite.”

She gave him no further explanation and signaled to the man behind the counter that she wanted a Farris mineral water.

“Slayer sucks,” Oleg mumbled under his breath.

Katrine turned to him. “You must be Oleg.”

“Yes,” Oleg said sulkily, pulling up his army trousers and looking as if he both liked and disliked this attention from a mature woman.

“How d’ya know?”

Katrine smiled. “ ‘How d’ya know?’ Living on Holmenkollen

Ridge as you do, shouldn’t you say ‘How do you know?’? Is Harry teaching you bad habits?”

Blood suffused Oleg’s cheeks.

Katrine laughed quietly and patted Oleg’s shoulder. “Sorry, I’m just curious.”

The boy’s face went so red that the whites of his eyes were shining.

“I’m also curious,” Harry said, passing a burger to Oleg. “I assume you’ve found the pattern I asked for, Bratt. Since you’ve got time to come to a gig.”

Harry looked at her in a way that spelled out his warning: Don’t tease the boy.

“I’ve found something,” Katrine said, twisting the plastic top off the Farris bottle. “But you’re busy, so we can sort it out tomorrow.”

“I’m not so busy,” Harry said. He had already forgotten the film of grease, the feeling of suffocation.

“It’s confidential and there are a lot of people here,” Katrine said. “But I can whisper a couple of key words.”

She leaned closer, and over the fat he could smell the almost masculine fragrance of perfume and feel her warm breath on his ear.

“A silver Volkswagen Passat has just pulled up outside. There’s a woman sitting inside trying to catch your attention. I would guess it’s Oleg’s mother . . . ”

Harry straightened up with a jolt and looked out the large window toward the car. Rakel had wound down the window and was peering in at them.

“Don’t make a mess,” Rakel said as Oleg jumped into the backseat with the burger in his hand.

Harry stood beside the open window. She was wearing a plain, light blue sweater. He knew that sweater well. Knew how it smelled, how it felt against the palm of his hand and cheek.

“Good gig?” she asked.

“Ask Oleg.”

“What sort of band was it, actually?” She looked at Oleg in the mirror. “Those people outside are a bit oddly dressed.”

“Quiet songs about love and so on,” Oleg said, sending a quick wink to Harry when her eyes were off the mirror.

“Thank you, Harry,” she said.

“My pleasure. Drive carefully.”

“Who was that woman inside?”

“A colleague. New on the job.”

“Oh? Looked as if you knew each other pretty well already.”

“How so?”

“You . . . ” She stopped in midsentence. Then she slowly shook her head and laughed. A deep but bright laugh that came from down in her throat. Confident and carefree at the same time. The laugh that had once made him fall in love.

“Sorry, Harry. Good night.”

The window glided upward; the silver car glided off.

Harry walked the gauntlet down Brugata, between bars with music blaring out of open doors. He considered a coffee at Teddy’s Softbar, but knew it would be a bad idea. So he made up his mind to walk on by.

“Coffee?” repeated the guy behind the counter in disbelief.

The jukebox at Teddy’s was playing Johnny Cash, and Harry passed a finger over his top lip.

“You got a better suggestion?” Harry heard the voice that came out of his mouth; it was familiar and unfamiliar at the same time.

“Well,” said the guy, running a hand through his oily, glistening hair, “the coffee’s not exactly fresh from the machine, so what about a freshly pulled beer?”
Johnny Cash was singing about God, baptism and new promises.

“Right,” Harry said.

The man behind the counter grinned.

At that moment Harry felt the mobile phone in his pocket vibrate. He grabbed it quickly and greedily, as though it were a call he had been expecting.

It was Skarre.

“We’ve just received a missing-persons call that fits. Married woman with children. She wasn’t at home when the husband and children returned a few hours ago. They live way out in the woods in Sollihøgda. None of the neighbors have seen her and she can’t have left by car because the husband had it. And there are no footprints on the path.”

“Footprints?”

“There’s still snow up there.”

The beer was banged down in front of Harry.

“Harry? Are you there?”

“Yes, I am. I’m thinking.”

“What about?”

“Is there a snowman there?”

“Eh?”

“Snowman.”

“How should I know?”

“Well, let’s go and find out. Jump in the car and pick me up outside Gunerius shopping center, on Storgata.”

“Can’t we do this tomorrow, Harry? I’ve got some action lined up for tonight, and this woman is only missing, so there’s no immediate hurry.”

Harry watched the foam coiling its way down the outside of the beer glass like a snake.

“Actually . . . ,” Harry said, “ . . . there’s one hell of a hurry.”

Amazed, the bartender looked at the untouched beer, the fifty-krone note on the counter and the broad shoulders making off through the door as Johnny Cash faded out.

. . .

“Sylvia would never have simply left,” said Rolf Ottersen.

Rolf Ottersen was thin. Or, to be more precise, he was a bag of bones. His flannel shirt was buttoned all the way up, and from it protruded a gaunt neck and a head that reminded Harry of a wading bird. A pair of narrow hands with long, scrawny fingers that continually curled, twisted and twirled protruded from his shirtsleeves. The nails of his right hand had been filed long and sharp, like claws. His eyes, behind thick glasses in plain, round steel frames, the type that had been popular among seventies radicals, seemed unnaturally large. A poster on the mustard-yellow wall showed Indians carrying an anaconda. Harry recognized the cover of a Joni Mitchell LP from hippie Stone Age times. Next to it hung a reproduction of a well known self-portrait by Frida Kahlo. A woman who suffered, Harry thought. A picture chosen by a woman. The floor was untreated pine, and the room was lit by a combination of old-fashioned paraffin lamps and brown clay lamps, which looked as if they might have been homemade. Leaning against the wall in the corner was a guitar with nylon strings, which Harry took to be the explanation for Rolf Ottersen’s filed nails.

“What do you mean, she ‘would never have left’?” Harry asked.

In front of him on the living- room table Rolf Ottersen had placed a photograph of his wife with their twin daughters, Olga and Emma, ten years old. Sylvia Ottersen had big, sleepy eyes, like someone who had worn glasses all her life and then started wearing contact lenses or had laser eye surgery. The twins had their mother’s eyes.

“She would’ve said,” Rolf Ottersen explained. “Left a message.

Something must’ve happened.”

In spite of his despair his voice was muted and gentle. Rolf Ottersen pulled a handkerchief from his trouser pocket and put it to his face. His nose seemed abnormally big for his narrow, pale face. He blew his nose in one single trumpet blast.

Skarre poked his head inside the door. “The dog patrol’s here. They’ve got a cadaver dog with them.”

“Get going, then,” Harry said. “Have you spoken to all the neighbors?”

“Yep. Still nothing.”

Skarre closed the door, and Harry saw that Ottersen’s eyes had become even bigger behind the glasses.

“Cadaver dog?” Ottersen whispered.

“Just a generic term,” Harry said, making a mental note that he would have to give Skarre a couple of tips on how to express himself.

“So you use them to search for living people as well?” From his intonation, the husband appeared to be pleading.

“Yes, of course,” Harry lied, rather than tell him that cadaver dogs sniffed out places where dead bodies had been. They were not used for drugs, lost property or living people. They were used for deaths.
Period.

“So you last saw her today at four,” Harry said, looking down at his notes. “Before you and your daughters went to town. What did you do there?”

“I took care of the shop while the girls had their violin lessons.”

“Shop?”

“We have a small shop in Majorstuen selling handmade African goods. Art, furniture, fabric, clothes, all sorts of things. They’re imported directly from the artisans, and the artisans are paid properly. Sylvia is there most of the time, but on Thursdays we’re open late, so she comes back home with the car and I go in with the girls. I’m at the shop while they have violin lessons at the Barrat Due Institute of Music from five until seven. Then I pick them up, and we come home. We were home a little after seven- thirty.”

“Mm. Who else works in the shop?”

“No one.”

“That must mean you’re closed for a while on Thursdays. About an hour?”

Rolf Ottersen gave a wry smile. “It’s a very small shop. We don’t have many customers. Almost none until the Christmas sales, to be honest.”

“How . . . ?”

“NORAD. They support shops and our suppliers as part of the government’s trade program with Third World countries.” He coughed quietly. “The message it sends is more important than money and shortsighted gain, isn’t it?”

Harry nodded, even though he wasn’t thinking about development aid and fair trade in Africa but about the clock and driv ing time in Oslo. From the kitchen, where the twins were eating a late snack, came the sound of a radio. He hadn’t seen a TV in the house.

“Thank you. We’ll carry on.” Harry got up and went outside.

Three cars stood parked in the yard. One was Bjørn Holm’s Volvo Amazon, repainted black with a checkered rally stripe over the roof and trunk. Harry looked up at the clear, starry sky arching over the tiny farm in the forest clearing. He breathed in the air. The air of spruce and wood smoke. From the edge of the wood he heard the panting of a dog and cries of encouragement from the policeman.

To get to the barn Harry walked in the arc they had determined so as not to destroy any clues they might be able to use. Voices were emanating from the open door. He crouched down and studied the footprints in the snow in the light from the outside lamp. Then he stood up, leaned against the frame and tugged out a pack of cigarettes.

“Looks like a murder scene,” he said. “Blood, bodies and overturned furniture.”

Bjørn Holm and Magnus Skarre fell silent, turned and followed Harry’s gaze. The big open room was lit by a single bulb hanging from a cable wrapped around one of the beams. At one end of the barn there was a lathe and, behind it, a board with tools attached: hammers, saws, pliers, drills. No electric gadgets. At the other end there was a wire fence and behind it chickens perched on shelves in the wall or strutted around, stiff-legged, on the straw. In the middle of the room, on gray, untreated, bloodstained floorboards, lay three headless bodies. Harry poked a cigarette between his lips without lighting it, entered, taking care not to step in the blood, and squatted down beside the chopping block to examine the chicken heads. The beam from his flashlight focused on matte-black eyes. First he held half a white feather that looked as if it had been scorched black along the edge, then he studied the smooth severing of the chickens’ necks. The blood had coagulated and was black. He knew this was a quick process, not much more than half an hour.

“See anything interesting?” asked Bjørn Holm.

“My brain has been damaged by my profession, Holm. Right now it’s analyzing chickens’ bodies.”

Skarre laughed and painted the newspaper headlines in the air: “savage triple chicken murder. voodoo parish. harry hole assigned.”

“What I can’t see is more interesting,” Harry said.

Bjørn Holm raised an eyebrow, looked around and began to nod slowly.

Skarre looked at them skeptically. “And that is?”

“The murder weapon,” Harry said.

“A hatchet,” Holm said. “The only sensible way to kill chickens.”

Skarre sniffed. “If the woman did the killing, she must have put the hatchet back in its place. Tidy types, these farmers.”

“I agree,” Harry said, listening to the cackle of the chickens, which seemed to be coming from all sides. “That’s why it’s interesting that the chopping block is upside down and the chickens’ bodies scattered around. And the hatchet is not in its place.”

“Its place?” Skarre faced Holm and rolled his eyes.

“If you can be bothered to take a peek, Skarre,” Harry said without moving.

Skarre was still looking at Holm, who nodded toward the board behind the lathe.

“Shit,” said Skarre.

In the empty space between a hammer and a rusty saw was the outline of a small hatchet.

From outside came the sound of a dog barking and whimpering, and then the policeman’s loud shout, which was no longer encouraging. Harry rubbed his chin. “We’ve searched the whole barn, so for the moment it looks as if Sylvia Ottersen left the place while slaughtering the chickens, taking the hatchet with her. Holm, can you take the body temperatures of these chickens and estimate the time of death?”

“Yup.” “Eh?” Skarre said.

“I want to know when she ran off,” Harry said. “Did you get anything from the shoe prints outside, Holm?”

The forensic officer shook his head. “Too trampled, and I need more light. I found several of Rolf Ottersen’s boot prints. Plus a couple of others going to the barn, but none from the barn. Perhaps she was carried out of the barn?”

“Mm. Then the prints of the carrier would have been deeper. Shame no one stepped in the blood.” Harry peered at the dark walls outside the range of the bulb. From the yard they heard a dog’s pitiful whine and a policeman’s furious curses.

“Go and see what’s up, Skarre,” Harry said.

Skarre went, and Harry switched the flashlight back on and walked toward the wall. He ran his hand along the unpainted boards.
“What’s . . . ,” Holm began, but stopped when Harry’s boot hit the wall with a dull thud.

The starry sky came into view.

“A back door,” Harry said, staring at the black forest and the silhouette of spruce trees against the dome of dirty- yellow light from the town in the distance. He shone the flashlight on the snow. The beam immediately found the tracks.

“Two people,” Harry said.

“It’s the dog,” Skarre said on his return. “It won’t budge.”

“Won’t budge?” Harry lit up the trail of footprints. The snow reflected the light, but the trail vanished in the darkness beneath the trees.

“The dog handler doesn’t understand. He says the dog seems petrified.

At any rate it refuses to go into the forest.”

“Perhaps it can smell fox,” Holm said. “Lots of foxes in this forest.”

“Foxes?” Skarre snorted. “That big dog can’t be afraid of foxes.”

“Perhaps it’s never seen a fox,” Harry said. “But it knows it can smell a predator. It’s rational to be afraid of what you don’t know. The dog that isn’t won’t live long.” Harry could feel his heart begin to quicken. And he knew why. The forest. The dark. The type of terror that was not rational. The type that had to be overcome.

“This is to be treated as a crime scene until further notice,” Harry said. “Start work. I’ll check where this trail leads.”

“OK.”
Harry swallowed before stepping out the back door. It had been more than thirty years ago. And still his body bristled.

He had been staying at his grandparents’ house in Åndalsnes during his autumn vacation. The farm lay on a hillside with the mighty Romsdal Mountains towering above. Harry had been ten and had gone into the forest to look for the cow his grandfather was searching for. He wanted to find it before his grandfather, before anyone. So he hurried. Ran like a maniac over hills of soft blueberry bushes and funny, crooked dwarf birch trees. The paths came and went as he ran in a straight line toward the bell he thought he had heard among the trees. And there it was again, a bit farther to the right now. He jumped over a stream and ducked under a tree and his boots squelched as he ran across a marsh with a rain cloud edging toward him. He could see the veil of drizzle beneath the cloud showering the steep mountainside.

And the rain was so fine that he had not noticed the darkness descending; it slunk out of the marsh, it crept between the trees, it spilled down through the shadows of the mountainside like black paint and collected at the bottom of the valley. He looked up at a large bird circling high above, so dizzyingly high he could see the mountain behind it. And then a boot got stuck and he fell. Facedown and without anything to grab. Everything went dark, and his nose and mouth were filled with the taste of marsh, of death, decay and darkness. He could taste the darkness for the few seconds he was under. And then he came up again, and discovered that all the light had gone. Gone across the mountain towering above him in its silent, heavy majesty, whispering that he didn’t know where he was, that he hadn’t known for a long time. Unaware that he had lost a boot, he stood up and began to run. He would soon see something he recognized. But the landscape seemed bewitched; rocks had become heads of creatures growing up out of the ground, bushes were fingers that scratched at his legs and dwarf birch trees were witches bent with laughter as they pointed the way, here or there, the way home or the way to perdition, the way to his grandparents’ house or the way to the Pit. Because adults had told him about the Pit. The bottomless swamp where cattle, people and whole carts vanished, never to return.

It was almost night when Harry tottered into the kitchen and his grandmother hugged him and said that his father, grandfather and all the adults from the neighboring farm were out looking for him. Where had he been?

In the forest.

But hadn’t he heard their shouts? They had been calling Harry; she had heard them calling Harry all the time.

He didn’t remember it himself, but many times later he had been told that he had sat there trembling with cold on the wooden box in front of the stove, staring into the distance with an apathetic expression on his face, and had answered: “I didn’t think it was them calling.”

“Who did you think it was, then?”

“The others. Did you know that darkness has a taste, Grandma?”

Harry had walked barely a few yards into the forest when he was overtaken by an intense, almost unnatural silence. He shone the flashlight down on the ground in front of him because every time he pointed it into the forest, shadows ran between the trees like jittery spirits in the pitch black. Being isolated from the dark in a bubble of light didn’t give him a sense of security. Quite the opposite. The certainty that he was the most visible object moving through the forest made him feel naked, vulnerable. The branches scraped at his face, like a blind man’s fingers trying to identify a stranger.

The tracks led to a stream whose gurgling noise drowned his quickened breathing. One of the trails disappeared while the other followed the stream on lower ground.

He went on. The stream wound hither and thither, but he wasn’t concerned about losing his bearings; all he had to do was retrace his steps.

An owl, which must have been close by, hooted an admonitory to wit-to-woo. The dial on his watch glowed green and showed that he had been walking for more than fifteen minutes. Time to go back and send in the team with proper footwear, gear and a dog that was not afraid of foxes.

Harry’s heart stopped.

It had darted past his face. Soundless and so fast that he hadn’t seen anything. But the current of air had given it away. Harry heard the owl’s wings beating in the snow and the piteous squeak of a small rodent that had just become its prey.

He slowly let out the air from his lungs. Shone the flashlight over the forest ahead one last time and turned to go back. Took one step, then came to a halt. He wanted to take another, two more, to get out. But he did what he had to do. Shone the light behind him. And there it was again. A glint, a reflection of light that should not be there in the middle of the black forest. He went closer. Looked back and tried to fix the spot in his mind. It was about fifty feet from the stream. He crouched down. Just the steel stuck up, but he didn’t need to brush away the snow to see what it was. A hatchet. If there had been blood on it after the chickens were killed, it was gone now. There were no footprints around the hatchet. Harry shone the flashlight and saw a snapped twig on the snow a few yards away. Someone must have thrown the ax here with enormous strength.

At that moment Harry felt it again. The sensation he had had at the Spektrum earlier that evening. The sensation that he was being observed. Instinctively, he switched off the flashlight, and the darkness descended over him like a blanket. He held his breath and listened. Don’t, he thought. Don’t let it happen. Evil is not a thing. It cannot take possession of you. It’s the opposite; it’s a void, an absence of goodness. The only thing you can be frightened of here is yourself.

Harry switched on the flashlight and pointed it toward the clearing.

It was her. She stood erect and immobile between the trees, looking at him without blinking, with the same large, sleepy eyes as in the photograph. Harry’s first thought was that she was dressed like a bride, in white, that she was standing at the altar, here, in the middle of the forest. The light made her glitter. Harry breathed in with a shiver and grabbed his mobile phone from his jacket pocket. Bjørn Holm answered after the second ring.

“Cordon off the whole area,” Harry said. His throat felt dry, rough.

“I’m calling in the troops.”

“What’s happened?”

“There’s a snowman here.”

“So?”

Harry explained.

“I didn’t catch the last part,” Holm shouted. “Poor coverage here . . . ”

“The head,” Harry repeated. “It belongs to Sylvia Ottersen.”

The other end went quiet.

Harry told Holm to follow the footprints and hung up.

Then he crouched against a tree, buttoned his coat right up and switched off the flashlight to save the battery while he waited. Thinking he had almost forgotten what it tasted like, the darkness.

From the Hardcover edition.

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Reading Group Guide

1. The Snowman begins with a disturbing scene set in 1980, more than two decades before the events that follow.  How does the opening establish the mood of the rest of the novel? What recurring themes and motifs does it introduce?

2. In what ways does the investigative team—Magnus Skarre, Katrine Bratt, and Bjorn Holm—represent the different viewpoints and skills involved in police work? What do the details about their demeanor and interests (for example, the description of Bratt and the profile of Holm) as well as their reactions to Harry’s presentation of the case convey about their personalities? 

3. Rakel, Skarre, and Hagen offer succinct descriptions of Harry and what motivates him. Can Harry’s “anger and the desire for revenge” and his history of alcoholism be attributed to his experiences as a police detective or are they personal flaws?

4. Do you agree with Hagen’s comparison between Harry and military leaders and his assertion that "There’s a strong social urge in man to be needed. . . . You want this case to be special. You want it so much that you can see the blackest of the black"?

5. What does Harry’s relationship with Rakel and especially with Oleg reveal about him? What personal principles, emotions, and values underlie his attachment to them? What incidents in the investigation also capture this side of him?

6. To what extent do the police rely on standard assumptions about the disappearance or deaths of women in their approach to solving the crimes? Do the circumstances of the individual women—including their relationships with their husbands and children and their reputations within the community—influence the direction of the investigations?

7. The murdered women all had secrets. Discuss the reasons for or explanations of Sylvia Ottersen’s, Eli Kvale’s, and Birte Becker’s lies and deceptions. What does their behavior demonstrate about their sense of power—or lack of power—in their marriages? What moral questions arise in each case?

8. The journalist and TV pundit Arve Stop says, “as a pressman and a liberalist I have principles to consider. The issue here is whether I, as a declared anti-establishment watchdog, should unconditionally make my services available to the ruling power’s forces of law and order” and goes on to say, “I promise to assist in any way I am able . . . If you in the force assist us." Does this passage accurately illustrate the relationship between the police and the media? Can you offer real-life examples of cases that indicate cooperation, either blatant or covert, between them? Are there situations in which such collaboration is helpful?

9. During the investigation several people come under suspicion. Are the suspicions in each case supported by credible arguments and evidence? Which suspects seemed to you the most likely to have committed the murders and why?

10. How does Nesbø set the stage for the encounter between Bratt and Avre Stop? What aspects of  Bratt’s personality—and of Stop’s—enable her to manipulate the dangerous course of events?

11. What characteristics, good and bad, does Harry share with Rafto? In what ways are their careers similar? How do they compare to other fictional detectives in classic and contemporary literature?

12. What are the major turning points in the investigation? What do the twists in the plot demonstrate about the interplay of  routine procedures and intuition in solving the murders? Discuss why Harry attributes his identification of the killer to “a fluke. An atypical fluke” and what this implies about the nature of criminal investigations.

13. What drives the killer’s decision to “leave clear clues, show them the connections, give them the bigger picture”? In what ways do the killer’s actions and motivation conform to your beliefs or knowledge about serial murderers, both fictional and real? Consider such factors as psychological problems caused by childhood traumas; the possession of above-average intelligence; the ability to charm others; and the sense of superiority often associated with such criminals.

14. Harry’s mentor Stale Aune, says, “The more aged I become, the more I tend to the view that evil is evil, mental illness or not. We’re all more or less disposed to evil . . . we’re all sick with personality disorders. And our actions define how we are." To what extent do the characters in the novel—victims, suspects, and members of the police, including Harry—struggle with “personality disorders”?  In your opinion, does some degree of mental illness explain most, if not all, criminal behavior?

15. What techniques does Nesbo use to control the pace and tension of the narrative? Discuss the effect of the flashbacks that interrupt the on-going investigation; Harry’s private moments with Oleg and Rakel; the casual interactions among the police team; and the detailed, graphic accounts of crimes and the discovery of bodies.

16. Do the descriptions of life in Norway—from the weather to the rivalry between the cities Oslo and Bergen, to discussions of crime and other societal problems—enhance the novel? What function do the references to the American elections and culture serve?

17. Jo Nesbø is one of several Scandinavian crime fiction authors who are increasingly popular in this country. In what ways does The Snowman, well as works by Stieg Larsson, Henning Mankell, and Maj Sjöwall, differ from American thrillers? What qualities, if any, distinguish Harry and his colleagues from the detectives depicted in American books, television shows, and movies?

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 307 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(124)

4 Star

(90)

3 Star

(47)

2 Star

(23)

1 Star

(23)

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 308 Customer Reviews
  • Posted May 7, 2011

    Hey you... anonymous!

    How is 12.99 not considered cheaper than the hardcover price of over 25? And publishers set pricing, bookstores merely play along to make sure they have the book to offer you in the first place. Lastly: do not RATE the books poorly because you are unhappy with the pricing. Rate them by their merit as reading material. Last year I spent $24 on a Nesbo paperback because I knew it was worth the cost of importing from Canada.

    20 out of 29 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted May 12, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    The Snowman is full of twists and turns. It's the type of book that you cook with, sleep with and eat with. I could not turn the pages fast enough. It was that good.

    This book was fantastic! I am loving Scandinavian crime fiction and Nesbø is a master storyteller. There's just something about the texture and mood of his writing that appeals to me. The story begins in Oslo with a young boy waking up to the first snow of the season. His mother is missing, and in her place is a snowman, wearing her scarf. As Harry is called in to investigate, another woman is reported missing and the pattern is repeated. Each time, the snowman becoming more gruesome than the last. Harry is an interesting character and constantly evolving. His personal life is always stressed in some way and he's always teetering on the edge of destruction. Sometimes he's on the wagon (recovering alcoholic) and other times he caves to his weaknesses, but this is what I love about Harry. Professionally, there is never anyone else more suited to the job, yet you wonder if he will ever pull it together and as a reader, you cheer him on and hope for the best. I can't think of any other time when I've cheered a detective on. I got my coworker to read it and he's come in here three times to tell me who the killer is, and each time he's been wrong! Nesbø is so good at what he does. If you've never read Scandinavian crime fiction, give this series a try. The only challenge is that some of the books are not currently available in the US. That's why Jill and I had to read them out-of-order, but The Book Depository has a few of them (they ship for free) and you might be able to get some of them from other sources. I am hoping that once the entire series has been released someone will publish them as a complete set. It sounds like a hassle to seek these books out but you won't be sorry if you do.

    18 out of 18 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 14, 2011

    Forget the price; this is a good book

    Jo Nesbo writes great thrillers. I highly recommend them to anyone who enjoyed The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo. In fact I would say that the characters he creates are far more compelling than Stieg Larsson's. If you don't like the price, don't buy the book and don't give a poor review because of pricing.

    16 out of 19 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted May 19, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    Another great one from Nesbo!

    One of the finest Scandinavian policemen, Harry Hole, is back is this new release from Nesbo.

    During the first snow of the season in Oslo, a young boy wakes up to find his mother has disappeared. Outside of his window there is a new snowman wearing his mother's scarf. Harry Hole and Katrine Bratt are investigating the disappearance when another woman goes missing during a new snowfall, and again, a snowman suddenly appears. But this time, the killer has added part of the woman's body to his icy sculpture.

    Harry received a strange letter months earlier that made reference to snowmen and a serial killer from early in his career. He realizes that the anonymous letter is connected to these new murders but he doesn't yet know what the connection is. As the investigation and murders continue, it's apparent that the killer is taunting Harry personally. With his bosses and the press breathing down his neck, the race is on to find the killer.

    Nesbo continues to paint Hole as an intelligent and intuitive investigator, but at the same time a lonely and damaged man. Harry still struggles with his drinking problem and his relationship with Rakel is all but over. She has moved on, but Harry is having trouble letting go, in part because of the sexual tension between them.

    Darker than Nesbo's previous novels, THE SNOWMAN is a stunning and complex mystery that deserves to go to the top of your reading list.
    P.S.: I wish people would stop leaving low ratings because of price. It's so unfair to the authors who write these great books for us. Lynn Kimmerle

    12 out of 15 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted May 13, 2011

    Worth every penny.

    Great book. Nesbo is fantastic

    8 out of 8 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted June 28, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    REALLY GOOD READ!

    An avid reader,I was drawn to this novel after reading the Steig Larsen trilogy. It proved to be better than I expected! I did like the Larsen trio but The Snowman was better. It is better absorbed, maybe more easily read; less characters and locations to follow. It's gripping-had me reading well into the night- and had me guessing who the "culprit" was throughout(I didn't guess correctly!) .I have suggested this to several people who have read the Larson series and am waiting for their reviews. I am definitely looking at the other novels by Nesbo.

    5 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 18, 2012

    An Exciting Thriller!

    What a great and absorbing read. I was able to live with the gore because the telling was so grear.

    4 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted August 14, 2011

    Great book!

    I do not spook easily when it comes to scary books...but this book paints a thrilling picture that would keep me up at night. Lost sleep because I did not want to put it down.

    4 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted July 7, 2011

    I liked it but it

    Dragged a bit. Would buy it again though

    4 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted July 3, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    Awesome Book, But A Little Much

    Jo Nesbo has definitely found a place in my library, however the book was a little too long for me. I would not have minded if it had been just one long mystery, but in this book they found the killer way to many times.

    4 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 31, 2011

    Horribly Slow

    I just stopped reading this book after a little past half through. It is too slowed paced. It made me feel like it was never going to end, get on with it already. Probably will not finish it unless I am desperate for something to read.

    4 out of 7 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted March 23, 2012

    Read this next!

    If you enjoy a complex psychological mystery that is eerie with great character development, this is for you. My first Jo Nesbo book. Now I know why so many recommended it to me.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted July 5, 2011

    Good twists

    I liked the book but thought it was a little long and sometimes boring when he talked in depth using town names, streets, etc.

    3 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted June 14, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    Kept me reading

    This was a pretty good book. I am a mystery lover and there haven't been too many mysteries released lately that have held my interest. I'm interested in reading more of Jo Nesbo.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted June 8, 2011

    Cannot recommend, read previous Harry Hole books. Three stars generous.

    I do not consider this book one of the better books by Jo Nesbo. I've read the others and really enjoyed them. I had to really plod thru this one, too many characters, too long. Why are all reviews so wonderful, can't we get honest reviews, saying that the author has not written the greatest around? I was so looking forward to the latest Harry Hole, too bad for people who haven't read the previous ones, so much more enjoyable. Glad I did not buy, but checked out from library.

    3 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted February 20, 2012

    Great book

    Very engaging. Highly recommend

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted February 2, 2012

    you should check this book out if you want a good detective/thriller read

    At the beginning of this book there were too many characters to keep up with but as the book progresses you follow the lead character and want to know what's going to happen as he tries to uncover the mystery murders. Proud of me to say but I figured out the killer in the middle of the book but wasn't 100% sure. Very good read if you want to poke your brain.

    1 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted January 28, 2012

    I Also Recommend:

    As Inspector Harry Hole might say, "Mm. Good."

    I picked up THE SNOWMAN hoping to add another good serial killer novel to my recommendation list (that includes THE KILLER INSIDE ME, ZOMBIE, I, KILLER, and THE COLLECTOR). I don't know whether it qualifies, not because it isn't good: THE SNOWMAN is great. But it deals more with the investigation of a series of serial murders of women with children. My serial killer interest is in the psychology of the killer, novelized and presented in either first- or third-person. What makes THE SNOWMAN outstanding is what makes any crime novel superior, or any novel, for that matter: the characters, in particular Norwegian Police Service Inspector Harry Hole. Nesbo has written nine Harry Hole novels to date (seven translated by Dan Barlett, which tells me English readers are getting a true representation of Nesbo's style); THE SNOWMAN is the seventh in the series. While THE SNOWMAN is my introduction, I can see that Harry has quite a history. He's a tortured man who turned to the bottle. He's off booze when the novel opens but does succumb a couple of times before confronting the snowman killer. Who wouldn't when you believe the killer wants to involve you in his crazy destructive plans. However, the biggest part of his problem lies with his passion for Rakel, his girlfriend, who has pitched him for a doctor; who broke off their affair because she saw Harry had only one love: the cop shop. As with alcohol, Harry can't stay away from her and she can't keep her hands off him. Bad, but good, too, for readers, as it intensifies a very dramatic, some might say overwrought, ending. As for the serial killer, I will say he's an interestingly demented fellow. I really can't say too much about him, otherwise I might give him away. I will say astute readers will have a good idea who he is quite early in the book. That doesn't much hurt the book, as the real interest is in Harry. I will also say Nesbo does a good job with certain abnormalities that both drive the plot and give reason and credence to the killer. I will also say the killer builds snowmen as harbingers of death; uses them to kill with; leaves no complete bodies; employs a most unusual tool that probably will be new to you; and harbors a hatred toward women with certain types of children. An added feature is the locale. Norway and Oslo are beautiful places. I visited the city many years ago in June, to be awakened by roaring cars and bright sunshine at one in the morning. Of course, the opposite is the case in the novel: it's November, the first snows are falling, and the days are turning into gray, short affairs, the perfect atmosphere for hunting down a lunatic killer. Highly recommended for aficionados of crime fiction.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 19, 2012

    This is a great book!

    This book kept my interest from beginning to end. If you like mystery crime novels this book is a must read. I love this author and all his books!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 18, 2012

    Great mystery

    Lots of red herrings. I was truly in the dark until the big reveal. Good read.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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