Snuff (Discworld Series #39) [NOOK Book]

Overview

For nearly three decades, Terry Pratchett has enthralled millions of fans worldwide with his irreverent, wonderfully funny satires set in the fabulously imaginative Discworld, a universe remarkably similar to our own. From sports to religion, politics to education, science to capitalism, and everything in between, Pratchett has skewered sacred cows with both laughter and wisdom, and exposed our warts, foibles, and eccentricities in a unique, entertaining, and ultimately serious ...

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Snuff (Discworld Series #39)

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Overview

For nearly three decades, Terry Pratchett has enthralled millions of fans worldwide with his irreverent, wonderfully funny satires set in the fabulously imaginative Discworld, a universe remarkably similar to our own. From sports to religion, politics to education, science to capitalism, and everything in between, Pratchett has skewered sacred cows with both laughter and wisdom, and exposed our warts, foibles, and eccentricities in a unique, entertaining, and ultimately serious way.

At long last, Lady Sybil has lured her husband, Sam Vimes, on a well-deserved holiday away from the crime and grime of Ankh-Morpork. But for the commander of the City Watch, a vacation in the country is anything but relaxing. The balls, the teas, the muck—not to mention all that fresh air and birdsong—are more than a bit taxing on a cynical city-born and -bred copper.

Yet a policeman will find a crime anywhere if he decides to look hard enough, and it’s not long before a body is discovered, and Sam—out of his jurisdiction, out of his element, and out of bacon sandwiches (thanks to his well-meaning wife)—must rely on his instincts, guile, and street smarts to see justice done. As he sets off on the chase, though, he must remember to watch where he steps. . . . This is the countryside, after all, and the streets most definitely are not paved with gold.

Hailed as the “purely funniest English writer since Wodehouse” (Washington Post Book World), with a “satirist’s instinct for the absurd and a cartoonist’s eye for the telling detail” (Daily Telegraph, London), Terry Pratchett offers a novel of crime, class, prejudice, and punishment that shows this master at his dazzling best.

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Editorial Reviews

From Barnes & Noble

Terry Pratchett, or more properly Sir Terry Pratchett, continues to brighten our days and nights with his mega-popular Discworld series, which already tallies more than sixty-five million copies sold. With this rollicking vacation adventure of Commander Sam Vimes, Snuff extends the winning streak of the man the Washington Post Book World called "the purely funniest English writer since Wodehouse." Born to be a bestseller.

Kerry Fried
…[Pratchett] continue[s] to surpass readers' expectations. A full-on Vimes vehicle…Snuff daringly links the demonization of goblins to two of the worst crimes in human history: slavery and the Holocaust. Some might be offended, but Pratchett doesn't make such connections lightly. His first Discworld book may have been a frolic, but his magic has long since been set in strong moral mortar.
—The Washington Post
Publishers Weekly
Pratchett’s 39th Discworld novel (after 2010’s I Shall Wear Midnight) brings back fan favorite Sam Vimes, the cynical yet extraordinarily honorable Ankh-Morpork City Watch commander also known (if unenthusiastically) as His Grace Sir Samuel, the Duke of Ankh. Vimes faces an onerous task: two weeks off in the country at his wife’s family estate. It’s not the thought of spending time with his beloved Sybil or precocious six-year-old Young Sam that bothers him; it’s just that a copper can’t stop being a copper. Fortunately, even in this conservative hamlet, there’s plenty of skullduggery to investigate, beginning with the brutal murder of a goblin girl. With the help of untried local constable Feeney Upshot and gentleman’s gentleman Willikens, Vimes takes on a fiendish murderer as well as the case for (in)human rights and social justice in this lively outing, complete with sly shout-outs to Jane Austen and gritty police procedurals. (Oct.)
The Independent
“A triumphant effort.”
The Guardian
“Thirty-seven books in and ... Discworld is still going strong...and doing so with undimmed, triumphant exuberance. ”
Booklist
“In short, this is as busy and as daft as any other Discworld yarn, which means it is the quintessence of daft. Nobody writes fantasy funnier than Pratchett.”
The Independent on Sunday
“A triumphant effort.”
tor.com
“The humor is sharp and the characters are charming, and the plight of the goblins creates moments of genuine pathos that are the highlight of the book.”
tor.com on SNUFF
“The humor is sharp and the characters are charming, and the plight of the goblins creates moments of genuine pathos that are the highlight of the book.”
Library Journal
Sam Vimes, Commander of the City Watch and reluctant Duke of Ankh, has faced down trolls, vampires, and the implacable politics of the Patrician, Lord Vetinari. But in Pratchett's newest Discworld (Unseen Academicals) novel, Sam is forced to do something he swore he would never do: take a vacation. At the insistence of his wife, Lady Sibyl, Sam is dragged to her family's country estate, far from the familiar crime and pollution of his beloved Ankh-Morpork. But the country is far from idyllic. Sam's instincts quickly send him on the trail of something rotten among the posh and elite. The Duke of Ankh may have been sent to the county for rest and relaxation, but perhaps the Commander of the City Watch was sent for justice. VERDICT Series followers will delight in this latest entry as it offers them a chance to catch up with Pratchett's recurring protagonist while enjoying a tight, fast-paced take on the traditional police procedural novel. As often happens, Pratchett's fun, irreverent-seeming story line masks a larger discussion of social inequalities and the courage it takes to stand up for the voiceless.—Jennifer Beach, Cumberland Cty. P.L., VA
Kirkus Reviews

Pratchett's new Discworld (Unseen Academicals, 2009, etc.) novel—the umpteenth, but who's counting?—features the Duke of Ankh, otherwise known as Commander Sir Samuel Vimes of the Ankh-Morpork City Watch, whose estimable wife, Lady Sybil, decrees that they shall take a vacation at her ancestral estate in the country.

Sam meets the local aristocracy and receives invitations to a lot of balls. He introduces six-year old Sam Junior to the author of young Sam's favorite book,The World of Poo. He faces down the irascible, aristocracy-hating local blacksmith and dines on Bung Ming Suck Dog. And, canny copper that he is, Vines, though out of his jurisdiction and out of his depth in a most alarming environment, senses wrongdoing. Sure enough, he's soon contemplating the slaughtered corpse of a goblin girl. Problem is, the law doesn't recognize the killing of goblins as murder. Still, there's smuggling going on, much of it involving substances far less innocent than tobacco. Crime or no crime, Sam determines to investigate, even to the rank, fetid caves where the last few goblins, starving, hunted and miserable, live. Sam doesn't fear the underground, being the Blackboard Monitor of the Dwarves. And tattooed on his wrist is a dreadful yet illuminating demon called the Summoning Dark, an entity that's as determined as Sam to bring justice to the poor goblins, despite the law and those who have decided to make their own rules. Funny, of course, but with plenty of hard edges; and, along with the excellent lessons in practical police work, genuine sympathy for the ordinary copper's lot.

A treat no fan of Discworld—and there are boatloads of them—will want to miss.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780062097866
  • Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers
  • Publication date: 10/11/2011
  • Series: Discworld Series , #39
  • Sold by: HARPERCOLLINS
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 480
  • Sales rank: 11,952
  • File size: 2 MB

Meet the Author

Terry Pratchett

Terry Pratchett is one of the world's most popular authors. His acclaimed novels are bestsellers in the United States and the United Kingdom, and have sold more than 85 million copies worldwide. In January 2009, Queen Elizabeth II appointed Pratchett a Knight Bachelor in recognition of his services to literature. Sir Terry lives in England.

Biography

Welcome to a magical world populated by the usual fantasy fare: elves and ogres, wizards and witches, dwarves and trolls. But wait—is that witch wielding a frying pan rather than a broomstick? Has that wizard just clumsily tumbled off the edge of the world? And what is with the dwarf they call Carrot, who just so happens to stand six-foot six-inches tall? Why, this is not the usual fantasy fare at all—this is Terry Pratchett's delightfully twisted Discworld!

Beloved British writer Pratchett first jump-started his career while working as a journalist for Bucks Free Press during the '60s. As luck would have it, one of his assignments was an interview with Peter Bander van Duren, a representative of a small press called Colin Smythe Limited. Pratchett took advantage of his meeting with Bander van Duren to pitch a weird story about a battle set in the pile of a frayed carpet. Bander van Duren bit, and in 1971 Pratchett's very first novel, The Carpet People, was published, setting the tone for a career characterized by wacky flights of fancy and sly humor.

Pratchett's take on fantasy fiction is quite unlike that of anyone else working in the genre. The kinds of sword-and-dragon tales popularized by fellow Brits like J.R.R. Tolkein and C. S. Lewis have traditionally been characterized by their extreme self-seriousness. However, Pratchett has retooled Middle Earth and Narnia with gleeful goofiness, using his Discworld as a means to poke fun at fantasy. As Pratchett explained to Locus Magazine, "Discworld started as an antidote to bad fantasy, because there was a big explosion of fantasy in the late '70s, an awful lot of it was highly derivative, and people weren't bringing new things to it."

In 1983, Pratchett unveiled Discworld with The Color of Magic. Since then, he has added installments to the absurdly hilarious saga at the average rate of one book per year. Influenced by moderately current affairs, he has often used the series to subtly satirize aspects of the real world; the results have inspired critics to rapturous praise. ("The most breathtaking display of comic invention since PG Wodehouse," raved The Times of London.) He occasionally ventures outside the series with standalone novels like the Johnny Maxwell Trilogy, a sci fi adventure sequence for young readers, or Good Omens, his bestselling collaboration with graphic novelist Neil Gaiman.

Sadly, in 2008 fans received the devastating news that Pratchett had been diagnosed with early onset Alzheimer's. He has described his own reaction as "fairly philosophical" and says he plans to continue writing so long as he is able.

Good To Know

Pratchett's bestselling young adult novel Only You Can Save Mankind was adapted for the British stage as a critically acclaimed musical in 2004.

Discworld is not just the subject of a bestselling series of novels. It has also inspired a series of computer games in which players play the role of the hapless wizard Rincewind.

A few fun outtakes from our interview with Pratchett:

"I became a journalist at 17. A few hours later I saw my first dead body, which was somewhat…colourful. That's when I learned you can go on throwing up after you run out of things to throw up."

"The only superstition I have is that I must start a new book on the same day that I finish the last one, even if it's just a few notes in a file. I dread not having work in progress.

"I grow as many of our vegetables as I can, because my granddad was a professional gardener and it's in the blood. Grew really good chilies this year.

"I'm not really good at fun-to-know, human interest stuff. We're not ‘celebrities', whose life itself is a performance. Good or bad or ugly, we are our words. They're what people meet.

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    1. Also Known As:
      Terence David John Pratchett
    2. Hometown:
      Salisbury, Wiltshire, England
    1. Date of Birth:
      April 28, 1948
    2. Place of Birth:
      Beaconsfield, Buckinghamshire, England
    1. Education:
      Four honorary degrees in literature from the universities of Portsmouth, Bristol, Bath and Warwick

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 116 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(76)

4 Star

(27)

3 Star

(9)

2 Star

(3)

1 Star

(1)

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 116 Customer Reviews
  • Posted October 13, 2011

    Disheartening

    While a long-time reader and steadfast zealot of Pratchett's works, his latest three books nearly bring me to tears at times. His illness is becoming more and more evident. Snuff rambled along its plotline in a disjointed fashion, and the characters we have grown so familiar with practically seemed strangers at times in the uncharacteristic manner in which they behaved. Willikins in particular behaves and speaks in a manner completely at odds with every previous portrayal of the character, as the most clear example. Further, the sense of clarity and incisiveness that always made Pratchett stand above his fellow writers so clearly has dimmed. While there were humorous moments, he never really wrung more than a bitter smile from me compared to the previous laughter he once evoked. While I will treasure his books and contribution to the world with all my heart, for all my life, I believe I will not read any future works of his. It would be too much like watching the slow death of a treasured grandparent.

    13 out of 22 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted October 18, 2011

    Terrific story, but nook version full of typos

    Terry Pratchett has, as usual, told a great story. Sadly, Harper Collins released an ebook/nook version full of typos (kindle owners are complaining, too). There are words mashed together on every page; it's nearly unreadable. Buy the paper copy!

    10 out of 10 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted October 12, 2011

    $12.99 for an eBook full of typos!

    Terry Pratchett has another gem! The story and characters are excellent. I can not give this eBook Nook version four stars as it is full of typos! How could the publisher release this? I am reading it with the Nook app on the iPad. The publisher should proof read and test these out before charging $12.99 for a digital copy. Next time I will get the Kindle version!

    6 out of 7 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted August 25, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    Terry Pratchett provides a strong entry filled with social commentary intertwined into an exciting thriller

    Ankh-Morpork City Watch Commander Sam Vimes faces his most difficult assignment in years. His Grace Sir Samuel, the Duke of Ankh, will spend two torturious weeks rusticating with his wife Sybil and their six years old son Young Sam at her family's estate. Sam loves the idea of spending time with his beloved spouse and son, but his in-laws make a boring vacation worse and not worth changing from his cardboard soles.

    However, life picks up as Vimes quickly gets involved with the locals when someone brutally murders a female goblin. Feeney the inexperienced local copper and Willikens the gentleman's gentleman assist Vimes as he works vacation time for no pay investigating the homicide.

    The latest Discworld satire (see I Shall Wear Midnight) is a wonderful entry that looks deeply at inalienable human (and other species) rights and bigotry to take away those accepted rights. Fast-paced Vimes is at his cynical best as he learns life in the country means a female woodcutter works with woodies and that rural does not mean crime free; as he leads the inquiry into the vicious murder of the Goblin Girl. Terry Pratchett provides a strong entry filled with social commentary intertwined into an exciting thriller.

    Harriet Klausner

    6 out of 7 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 27, 2011

    Love it!

    Fine additon to the Discword opus.
    As usual, it seems to start out slow. But he's building the groundwork for the maelstrom that soon follows.
    I enjoyed seeing the continued development of the characters, especially Sibyl and Willkins. They probably would not have acted like this in the earlier books, but the characters have changed and grown through the series, and here is the result.
    And of course Sam Vimes is just, well, Sam. Gods love him.

    4 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted October 14, 2011

    Another great entry from the greatest of authors

    A longtime reader of Sir Terry will enjoy the next installment in the Discworld series. The old characters are back, growing in believable ways, and new characters enter the story to make for an exciting adventure. There's action, there's romance, there's mystery - and as always, great insight to human nature. And a lot of laughs. If you've read other Discworld novels, grab this one quickly. If you haven't read any others...well, what are you waiting for?!

    4 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 24, 2012

    As always...

    Another amazing (albeit darker) Discworld offering. May we have Pratchett and Vimes for years to come!

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted October 23, 2011

    Heart Warming!

    Now that I've read the book in its entirety, I can recommend it wholeheartedly.
    Myself a long-time reader of Terry Pratchett's stories, I found this book to be absolutely wonderful. It was truly satisfying to read of real hope- to have such a clear description narrated of the actual good that all sentient beings can do. I also find the always-present realistic observations on the business of life very comforting.
    I hope Terry's books, especially the more recent ones- that illuminate such strong positive possibilities for our future- make it into everyone's home. And that people will actually think when they read them... but then, humans are humans, I suppose.

    What I *really* hope for is more from Terry Pratchett!

    - T. William Gage

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 20, 2011

    Wonderful read!

    Excellent read although the development of charcters moves in a direction I would not agree with. Still an excellent read!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted July 5, 2011

    Definitely worth the wait!

    Terry Pratchett has a new book coming out! I cant wait for "Snuff" I have read the entire Discworld series, and if you haven't, START READING THEM NOW! Pratchett's books are funny, entertaining and thought provoking. I would recommend them to absolutely anyone. The Discworld is wide and varied, often mirroring our own, and Pratchett has a real gift for creating absolutely unforgettable characters and situations. I couldn't say enough good things about this series and I have the highest of hopes for this new addition.

    1 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted January 4, 2014

    more from this reviewer

    Entertaining

    Pratchett's 'asides' have always been at least as entertaining as the primary plot line and "Snuff" just doesn't seem to have the same zing as previous works. The book is true to the characters and the plot line is entertaining but it didn't measure-up to my expectations.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 7, 2013

    Preachy and disjointed

    Sir Pratchett now reads like an imitator of his own work

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 8, 2013

    How you could give this less than 5 stars makes no sense!

    This is one of my favorite pratchett novels ever, and that's saying something. Want more

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 28, 2013

    A+

    Pratchett does it again! What else can I say that hasn't already boasted its awesomeness?

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  • Posted July 23, 2013

    Great open end of Sam Vimes series

    Start with Guards! Guards! and read through the books about Sam Vimes and the Watch. The series is fantastic: hilarious, politically charged, full of plot and action. Snuff is a worthy addition.

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  • Posted April 2, 2013

    Snuff is more than Enuff

    I like all of Mr. Prachett's Disc World books, and Snuff is the best of them. The story, centered on Commander Vimes, is mature and introspective, perhaps because there is no slapstick, except for that wee bit with Wee Mad Arthur and, of course, that thing with the barges. But Snuff is satisfying in every possible way and I was sorry to finish it and I am already looking forward to reading it again.

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  • Posted February 16, 2013

    This lived up to my expectation, which for a Discworld novel are

    This lived up to my expectation, which for a Discworld novel are high. I have always loved the fact that Sir Terry's characters grow and change as time passes and Sam is one of my favorites, so I enjoyed every second that I was reading it. While others here seem upset with the plot direction, I relished the development of Willikins beyond a two-dimensional caricature of the perfect 'gentleman's gentleman ' into a force in his own right. All-in-all, very satisfactory!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 22, 2013

    lovely

    Once of the best discworld novels i have read in years. I have always been a fan of Vimes though

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 1, 2012

    Pratchett...

    enough said.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 13, 2012

    Chicle

    Tree

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 116 Customer Reviews

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