So Long, Insecurity: You've Been a Bad Friend to Us

( 195 )

Overview

You’re considering this book because you saw the word insecurity . . .
. . . and all your buried insecurities surfaced. You know you’re insecure. So either you rushed to snatch the book up, not caring who saw, or you casually strolled over, hoping no one would see you as you slyly picked it up. You know you need help.
(You’re not alone.)
...

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So Long, Insecurity: You've Been a Bad Friend to Us

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Overview

You’re considering this book because you saw the word insecurity . . .
. . . and all your buried insecurities surfaced. You know you’re insecure. So either you rushed to snatch the book up, not caring who saw, or you casually strolled over, hoping no one would see you as you slyly picked it up. You know you need help.
(You’re not alone.)
Maybe you’re okay for the most part . . . but there are those insecurities you could work on. Things could be better. You’re wondering, Can I really say, “So long” to my insecurities?
(Yes, you can.)
Or maybe you’re just curious. You’re fine. You wonder what on earth there is for so many women to be insecure about. And has Beth Moore, of all people, struggled with insecurity?
(Yes, she has.)
Whoever you are, this book is for you, because you have it in you to besecure.
Tyndale House Publishers

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Prolific Bible teacher and women’s ministry leader Moore (Get Out of That Pit) moves away from her characteristic dead-on expositions of scriptural principles in her newest; the topic is insecurity, and the content, she admits, is close to an autobiography. Moore, always transparent with her own personal struggles, is refreshingly so throughout this text. Readers will be chortling in laughter one moment and sucking air the next as Moore exposes the many faces of female insecurity. The author names and claims each one, then defuses every bit of power these nonsensical inner voices possess by countering their lies with God’s truth. Women, no matter what their age, battle against advertising’s siren call for unattainable physical perfection; the habit of making a man’s love the ultimate validation; and the worldly definition of success as money, power, and status. Moore uses personal essays, women’s true confessions, expressive prayers, and lots of commonsense suggestions to jar women out of their insecure rut. Readers will delve into this work and find themselves comfortably uncomfortable, and this is a very good thing. (Feb.)
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781414334721
  • Publisher: Tyndale House Publishers
  • Publication date: 2/2/2010
  • Pages: 354
  • Sales rank: 78,919
  • Product dimensions: 6.10 (w) x 9.10 (h) x 1.30 (d)

Meet the Author

Beth Moore
Beth Moore
Beth Moore is a writer and teacher of best-selling books and Bible studies whose public speaking engagements carry her all over the United States. A dedicated wife and mother of two adult daughters, Moore lives in Houston, Texas, where she is president and founder of Living Proof Ministries.
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Read an Excerpt

So Long, Insecurity

you've been a bad friend to us
By BETH MOORE

Tyndale House Publishers, Inc.

Copyright © 2010 Beth Moore
All right reserved.

ISBN: 978-1-4143-3472-1


Chapter One

Mad Enough to Change

I'm seriously ticked. And I need to do something about it. Some people eat when they're about to rupture with emotion. Others throw up. Or jog. Or go to bed. Some have a holy fit. Others stuff it and try to forget it. I can do all those things in sequential order, but I still don't find relief.

When my soul is inflating until my skin feels like a balloon about to pop, I write. Never longhand, if I can help it. The more emotion I feel, the more I appreciate banging on the keys of a computer. I type by faith and not by sight. My keyboard can attest to the fact that I am a passionate person with an obsession for words: most of the vowels are worn off. The word ticked really should have more vowels. Maybe what I am is peeved. That's a good one. How about irrationally irritated to oblivion? Let that one wear the vowels off a keyboard.

The thing is, I'm not even sure exactly who I'm ticked at. I'm hoping to find that out as I hack away at these chapters. One thing is for certain. Once I figure it out, I probably won't keep it to myself. After all, you know how the saying goes: hell hath no fury like a woman scorned. And I'm feeling scorned.

But not just for myself. I'm feeling ticked for thewhole mess of us born with a pair of X chromosomes. My whole ministry life is lived out in the blessed chaos of a female cornucopia. I've been looking at our gender through the lens of Scripture for twenty-five solid years, and I have pondered over us, taken up for us, laid into us, deliberated over us, prayed about us, lost sleep because of us, cried for us, laughed my head off at us, and gotten offended for us-and by us-more times than I can count. And after a quarter of a century surrounded by girls ranging all the way from kindergarteners to those resting on pale pink liners inside caskets, I've come to this loving conclusion: we need help. I need help. Something more than what we're getting.

The woman I passed a few days ago on the freeway who was bawling her eyes out at the steering wheel of her Nissan needs help. The girl lying about her age in order to get a job in a topless bar needs help. The divorcée who has loathed herself into fifty extra pounds needs help. For crying out loud, that female rock star I've disdained for years needs help. When I read something demeaning her ex said about her recently-something I know would cut any female to the quick-I jumped to her defense like a jackal on a field mouse and seriously wondered how I could contact her agent and offer to mentor her in Bible study.

Several days ago I sat in a tearoom across the table from a gorgeous woman I love dearly. She has been married for three months, and they did all the right things leading up to that sacred ceremony, heightening the anticipation considerably. After an hour or so of musing over marriage, she said to me, "Last weekend he seemed disinterested in me. I'll be honest with you. It kind of shook me up. I wanted to ask him, 'So, are you over me now? That quick? That's it?'"

I'm pretty certain her husband will perk back up, but what a tragedy that she feels like she possesses the shelf life of a video game.

I flashed back to another recent communication with a magazine-cover-beautiful thirty-year-old woman who mentioned-almost in passing-that she has to dress up in costumes in order for her husband to want to make love to her. I'm not knocking her pink-feathered heels, but I wonder if she is paying too much for them. I'm just sad that she can't feel desirable as herself.

Then yesterday I learned that a darling fifteen-year-old I keep in touch with slept with her boyfriend in a last-ditch effort to hold on to him. He broke up with her anyway. Then he told. It's all over her high school now.

I've got a loved one going through her third divorce. She wants to find a good man in the worst way, and goodness knows they're out there. The problem is, she keeps marrying the same kind of man.

I'm so ticked.

If these examples were exceptions to the rule, I wouldn't bother writing, but you and I both know better than that. I hear echoes of fear and desperation from women day in and day out-even if they're doing their best to muffle the sound with their Coach bags. Oh, who am I kidding? I hear reverberations from my own heart more times than I want to admit. I keep trying to stifle it, but it won't shut up. Something's wrong with us for us to value ourselves so little. Our culture has thrown us under the bus. We have a fissure down the spine of our souls, and boy, does it need fixing.

This morning while I was getting ready for church, my cell phone nearly vibrated off the bathroom counter with six incoming texts from a single friend who was having a crisis of heart. I answered her with what little I had to give, even as I grappled with my own issues. I decided that what I needed was a good sermon to keep me from crying off my eyeliner, so I flipped on the television to a terrific local preacher. Lo and behold, the sermon was about what a woman needs from a man.

Deep sigh.

Actually, it was a great message if anyone had a mind to do what he was recommending, but knowing human nature and feeling uncharacteristically cynical, I could feel my frustration mounting. The preacher had done his homework. He offered half a dozen Scripture-based PowerPoint slides with state-of-the-art graphics describing what men should do for women. "Women want to be told that they are captivating. That they're beautiful. Desirable."

I won't deny that. What woman wouldn't thrive under that kind of steady affirmation?

But here's my question: What if no one tells us that? Can we still find a way to be okay? Or what if he says it because he's supposed to, but to be honest, he's not feeling it? Are we hopeless? What if a man is not captivated by us? What if he doesn't think we're particularly beautiful? Or, understandably, maybe just not every day? Are we only secure on his "on" days? What if he loves us but is not quite as captivated by us as he used to be? What if his computer is full of images of what he finds attractive, and we're light-years from it? What if we're seventy-five, and every ounce of desirability is long behind us? Can we still feel adequate in our media-driven society? Or is it only possible if our man has gone blind?

A guy told me the other day that normal men never get too old to eye women. Wow. Are those of us who are married to these "normal" men supposed to keep trying to compete with what's out there? Or should we simply tell ourselves that the roving eye of a mate is harmless? I'm not being defensive. I want very much to believe that it is. But if it is, harmless to who?

Or what if you're single and there's not a man on the horizon you want to take home to Daddy? Honestly, is there no validation for our womanhood apart from a man?

I find it ironic that many of the women who defensively deny needing one single thing from a man have done one of three things: they've tried to make themselves into men, they've turned to a codependent relationship with a masculine woman, or they've done the Sex and the City thing by trying to beat men at their own game.

Don't tell me we don't have man-issues. After all this time in women's ministry, I won't believe you. Maybe you are the rare exception, but this I know: if you are a real, live, honest-to-goodness secure woman who is neither obsessed with a man's affirmation nor nursing a grudge against one, you did not arrive at that place by accident. None of us will.

I want to get a couple of things out on the table as fast as I can:

1) Men are certainly not the only source of insecurity for women. We'll wrestle with other sources on the pages that follow. But we're starting here because a woman with an unhealthy heart toward men will invariably be unhealthy in all sorts of areas, some of which extend far beyond her sexuality.

2) I am not a man-basher. Nothing could be further from my intent than to blame men for our problems or infer that we should divorce ourselves from them emotionally in order to survive. God would flatten me like a horsefly if I did that. I don't think any male in my life would claim that I harbor repressed anger at his gender. (And if he did, I have a mind to hit him square in the middle of his forehead with a slingshot and a bottle of Midol.)

I'm a big fan of men. I've loved some fine ones and married my favorite one. Thirty years in, I'm still nuts about my husband and can't imagine life without him. Nobody makes me laugh like he does. Nobody makes me think like he does. Nobody has access to my heart like he does. He is worthy of my respect and gets a steady dose of it. So do my terrific sons-in-law, and if anybody on this earth is an object of my unbridled affection, it is my grandson, Jackson. I dearly love my guys and highly esteem so many others.

Men are not our problem; it's what we are trying to get from them that messes us up. Nothing is more baffling than our attempt to derive our womanhood from our men. We use guys like mirrors to see if we're valuable. Beautiful. Desirable. Worthy of notice. Viable. We try to read their expressions and moods in order to determine whether it's time to act smart and hard to get or play dumb and needy. Worse yet, we try to tap into their inner equestrian by acting like the damsel in distress. When XX meets XY and tries to pry that X away from him so she can have an extra one, she is attempting to mutate both of them.

I say this with respect and great compassion: we're attempting to get our security from a gender that doesn't really have much to spare. Our culture is just as merciless on men as it is on women. Their insecurities take different shapes, but make no mistake: they've got them. You know it. I know it.

Let's face it. Men want us to get a grip anyway. They don't like the pressure of being in charge of our sense of value. It's too much for them. The candid ones will gladly admit it, and for those who don't, you'll know it by the flapping of their shirts in the wind as they run for their lives.

A man is infinitely more attracted to a secure woman than to an emotional wreck who insists he could complete her. As my friend Christy Nockels says, "Men are not drawn to hysterical, needy women." I'm embarrassed to say that I know this fact from personal experience. No, it's not my normal approach, but sometimes life offers me such a monumentally irresistible opportunity to act like an idiot that I cave.

I have had the blessing and curse of being married to a very honest man. Keith is the kind who has prayed for forgiveness for impure thoughts even when I was sitting right there next to him with my head bowed. Needless to say, it didn't stay bowed. There I was, thinking nothing on earth was safer or more secure than praying with my husband ... then bam! Honestly, the man would not purposely injure me for the world. And goodness knows, after my first big reaction, he never did this type of prayer-confession again. He is a very loving guy. But he had no idea that one innocent comment (even about guilt, ironically enough) had the capacity to sting my self-esteem, let alone send me into all manner of vain imaginations, depending on my present frame of mind. The worst part of it is, I could still be thinking about what he said a solid week later while he remained oblivious.

Now that's a key word that raises an important point. Are we honestly going to insist on drawing our security from people-men or women-who are oblivious to the inordinate amount of weight we give to their estimation of us? Seriously? Maybe others in our lives are not so clueless. Maybe they revel in the power they hold over us. Either way, are we just going to live our lives hurt and offended? The thought is exhausting. The reality is ultimately debilitating.

In countless ways, Keith has been the best medicine in the world for my terminal case of idealism, as bitter as a dose may taste. I will never forget a brief dialogue we had about ten years ago after I'd suffered a permanent fracture in a friendship. Suddenly his fairly self-sufficient woman (whom he'd married specifically because of that trait) started trying to suck the life out of him and, oddly, thought he'd be glad about it. After considerable deliberation and the careful planning of one committing herself for life, I made a brave and tearful declaration to Keith that went something like this: "I'm going to focus my attention on you. You are my best friend. In many ways, my only friend. I've decided that you are the only person on the earth I can really trust." He looked at me like a scared rabbit and said, "Baby, you can't trust me!" It was vintage Keith. Though he had never been unfaithful to me nor did he plan to be, it was his spit-it-out-and-prepare-for-carnage way of saying, "You can't put all your trust in me! I can't take the pressure! I'll fail you too!" I was utterly bewildered. Back to square one.

A beautiful place to be, actually. A place I'm trying to find. Again. Maybe the person I'm ticked at is me. Maybe I'm furious at myself for needing any part of this journey for my own sake. How could I need anything else in this world beyond what I already have? Lord, have mercy. What more could a woman want? As a matter of fact, I'd like to tell you exactly what more this woman could want-and not just for herself. I want some soul-deep security drawn from a source that never runs dry and never disparages us for requiring it. We need a place we can go when, as much as we loathe it, we are needy and hysterical. I don't know about you, but I need someone who will love me when I hate myself. And yes, someone who will love me again and again until I kiss this terrestrial sod good-bye.

Life is too hard and the world too mean for many of us to grasp a lofty sense of acceptance, approval, and affirmation early on and keep hold of it the rest of our lives ... come what may. Circumstances abruptly change, and setbacks happen. Relationships unexpectedly end. Or, just as cataclysmically, begin. Schools change. Friends change. Jobs change. Offenses happen. Betrayals happen. Tragedies happen. Engagements end. Marriages begin. Kids come. Kids go. Health wanes. Seasons change. An old situation creeping up in a new season of our life can be more complicated than ever. We can think we've murdered that monster once and for all, and then it rises from the dead and it has grown another head.

As if the battle isn't hard enough, we sabotage ourselves, submerging ourselves with self-condemnation like a submarine filling with water. How often do we think to ourselves, I should be handling this better? So is it okay to ask why we're not? Like, what's at the root of an ugly knee-jerk reaction?

God did not create static beings when He breathed a soul into Adam. Dynamic creatures that we are, we are ever changing and ever spiraling up-or down. Please don't misunderstand. God forbid that we live life in a vicious cycle of gaining ground and losing it. I've learned some lessons that have lasted decades, and I hope to heaven I don't ever have to relearn them. However, I've never arrived at a place where injury or uncertainty no longer issues an invitation to some pretty serious self-doubt even when I make the tough decision not to bite the bait. I still get thrown for a loop more easily than I would like and find myself in a temporary but painful setback of insecurity-one that affects me too chronically to deny that something is broken somewhere. Often when a situation warrants a minor case of injured feelings, I tend to respond with a classic case of devastation. "I know better than this," I chide. "I can't believe I've fallen for this again. My head knows good and well that this doesn't define me. Why can't I get that message to my heart?"

Listen carefully: the enemy of our souls has more to gain by our setbacks than by our succumbing to an initial assault. The former is infinitely more demoralizing. Far more liable to make us feel hopeless and tempt us to quit. We can rationalize-even truthfully-that an initial assault caught us by surprise. Setbacks, on the other hand, just make us feel weak and stupid: I should have conquered this by now. I happened on a question not long ago that perfectly expresses this mentality: How many times must I prove myself an idiot?

(Continues...)



Excerpted from So Long, Insecurity by BETH MOORE Copyright © 2010 by Beth Moore. Excerpted by permission.
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

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Table of Contents

Acknowledgments vii

Introduction xi

Chapter 1 Mad Enough to Change 1

Chapter 2 Insecure Enough to Matter 15

Chapter 3 She Doesn't Look a Certain Way 29

Chapter 4 Good Company 45

Chapter 5 Rooting It Out 59

Chapter 6 A Cocktail of Ego and Culture 87

Chapter 7 Don't Let It Fool You 109

Chapter 8 A Beautiful Prize Called Dignity 145

Chapter 9 A Time and Place to Heal 161

Chapter 10 Neither Gods nor Devils 175

Chapter 11 Eating from the Wrong Tree 203

Chapter 12 Through the Eyes of the Guys 227

Chapter 13 The Power to Choose 239

Chapter 14 Can We Do It for Them? 261

Chapter 15 Looking Out for Each Other 275

Chapter 16 A Passion to Look Past Ourselves 297

Chapter 17 What Are You Afraid Of? 319

Chapter 18 A Clean Escape 335

So, You're Considering Christ 347

Notes 351

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 195 )
Rating Distribution

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(34)

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(30)

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(7)

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(9)

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 199 Customer Reviews
  • Posted June 18, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    Once again, Beth Moore has inspired me

    Review by Jill Williamson

    I love Beth Moore. I've never met her, but I've done several of her Bible studies and had the privilege of attending one of her conferences. The woman inspires me. Why? Because she's real. She's suffered through life, just like the rest of us, and she refuses to let that define her. Praise Jesus for that! That, and her passion for studying the Word of God, draws me, and thousands of other women, to her like sheep to a shepherd. She is a disciple of Jesus. She teaches His truth in a wonderful, personal, life-changing way.

    So when I saw this book, I knew I needed it. I've always had low self-esteem. And I am plagued by insecurity. The smallest little comment will send me into a spiral of woe. One example, I have the nasty habit of interpreting faces. I can read minds, too, you know. If someone looks at me funny, I know I did something to make them upset with me, and I can't stand it until I know everything is okay again. I've also trained myself to interpret email tones. I entertain my husband every time I read an email to him. He says I read every word with a negative, attacking tone, as if the author has a personal agenda against me--or someone.

    One of my husband's most telling phrases is: It must be exhausting being you.

    Well, ouch.

    But he's right. It is exhausting being so insecure. I don't mean to do this to myself. And I'm tired of it. And a bit ticked off, as Beth was in the beginning of her book. Having read the book, I will say that I now have confidence that I can beat this thing. Insecurity distracts our minds from living the life God intends for us. It keeps us weak instead of strong. It keeps us distant instead of loving. It keeps us judging instead of reaching out and building lasting friendships.

    Once again, Beth Moore has inspired me. I'm saying, "So long, Insecurity! You don't own this girl!" Whoo hoo! Now that's something to get excited about. If you've ever felt insecure, sit down and talk it out with Beth. And that's exactly what this book was. A nice, long, heart to heart with Beth Moore about a topic that plagues us. I highly recommend it.

    17 out of 17 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted February 3, 2010

    I Also Recommend:

    Thank You Beth

    Beth deals with one of those topics that we all try to hide, our insecurity. Do your insecurities keep you from using the gifts God gave you, then this is the book for you! I had a hard time putting it down, it did not take long to realize that this would be one of those rare books that would continue to make a big difference in my everyday life.

    8 out of 8 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted February 28, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    Goodbye Insecurity, Hello Dignity

    None of us are immune to feelings of insecurity. It could be something in our past that still haunts us, or something we are dealing with right now, or maybe something that worries us about our future. In this book, Beth Moore covers many different examples from real people who were willing to talk about the things that have made them feel insecure. I have read several other books written by Beth Moore, but this one really hit home for me. I could see myself in several of the examples, and some of them really made me laugh. We are such a curious species, and this book helps us to focus on what is really important. We can have confidence and security because of the gift of grace given to us by our Heavenly Father. We are his children, and we need to remember that! My absolute favourite part of the book? Right smack in the middle of the book there is an awesome prayer that is ... almost ten pages long! The reader is encouraged to find a quiet spot, a place to be undisturbed for at least half an hour. The prayer is to be read out loud, and there are blank lines to add your own thoughts. What a powerful prayer and one that I will go back to again and again. I cannot say enough about this book, except to encourage everyone to read it. Please get yourself a copy, and then you can also say, "So Long, Insecurity!" Thank you to Tyndale House Publishing for providing a complimentary copy of this book for the purpose of review.

    5 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted March 15, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    Exploring the world of Insecurity from a woman's perspective in a God centered method

    Beth Moore has created an inspiring book that gets to the root of women's insecurity through spiritual scripture, testimony, and in such a structure that readers not only explore the causes for their insecrity, but they understand how insecurity has hindered their progress.

    I read the entire book in one day - - it was that compelling and I have since practiced the prayer in Chapter 9 and have used this book to explore myself and my relationships with others.

    4 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted February 15, 2010

    Moore's guide to shedding insecurity is true success

    So Long, Insecurity by Beth Moore is aptly subtitled: You've Been a Bad Friend to Us. Moore, who is well respected in the field of Christian devotionals, has hit one out of the park with this book about discarding our insecurities and self-hatred. She opens her heart and exposes her own struggles with insecurity, inviting the reader to see her as a good friend. Through Scripture and personal stories, she exposes the truth behind the source of insecurities as well as the Godly truths He would have us know about our true identities. The Lord wants us to know how important we are to His kingdom and just how much He loves us, and Moore really focuses on encouraging readers to acknowledge who God created them to be. Every chapter feels like a heart-changing conversation with a best friend who knows you inside and out. It's Moore's humility and love for God that shine on every page and will win over readers.

    4 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 25, 2010

    Touches the heart and stirs the mind

    This book has helped me in so many ways and I can't wait to share it with everyone I meet. I would suggest it be standard reading to every woman from the age of 13 to 99

    2 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted March 11, 2010

    Finally

    This book is so helpful in addressing an issue that plagues all women. It is humorous and insightful and faces unflinchingly the trap that insecurity lays for each of us. It exposes the weave of entanglement we find ourselves in even from a young age, and with her usual graceful and honest style, the author attempts to free the reader from that web. It highlights truths that are relevant to every woman, and more than once I found myself nodding my head in affirmation. Beth Moore is gifted in transparency and in meticulous study. She listens well to a blog community which she has created in the last few years, and addresses the answers and questions brought to that digital table, with wisdom, humor and precision. I recommend it for most readers and hope that it is the first or better yet, final step in freedom from an age old pit.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted February 8, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    All women need to read this wonderful book!

    I was excited to be able to review Beth Moore's new book So Long, Insecurity: You've Been a Bad Friend to Us. This is a book that every woman should read. When I first saw the book was going to be available for review, I thought I'd like to read it because I've enjoyed Beth Moore's work for several years now. As I read it, though, I was really thankful to read the message.

    My thoughts:
    Several times as I was reading I was laughing and shaking my head in agreement to see myself in her stories and words. Beth wants to encourage women that we don't have to live in insecurity. Through the book we see the damage that is caused because of our insecurity. We live in a society that adds to our feelings of insecurity. What I liked about the book was that Beth used real comments from real women that she gathered doing a survey on her blog. She also has feedback from men, which was very eye-opening to see men's perspective on women's insecurities as well as insecurities that men have. Insecurity is not just for the female gender.

    I highly recommend that YOU read this book. There is something in this book for women of all ages. I already have two friends who've asked to borrow it, and I have many others I want to share it with too.

    "She is clothed with strength and dignity." Proverbs 31:25

    Also, I'd like to mention there is a simulcast event on April 24, 2010 on this topic.

    Thank you to Tyndale House Publishers for providing me with a complimentary copy of this book.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 26, 2013

    Loved it!

    My first Beth Moore reading and definitely not my last! Thank you for being so real and so raw.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 26, 2012

    Real!

    Do you want real, soul deep security...read this.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted September 18, 2012

    I have read this book and even recommended it to my non-Christia

    I have read this book and even recommended it to my non-Christian counselor friend who just loved it and has already recommended it to some of her clients!! She and I agree, it is also a very good book for men. anyone. All of us suffer from this malady at one time or another and this book helps steer us in the right direction. Loved it!!! Has helped me tremendously!!!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 20, 2010

    I was disappointed in this book, through no one's fault but my own

    I did not realize it was going to be so religious..I thought it was going to be about getting over insecurity, but there were too many references to the bible..did not expect that..I did not do my homework before I bought this book...I felt like I was reading a story from a born again person....was disappointed...the book, if you like the religious references, is very good, but I could not get over every few paragraphs having the bible thrown in my face...

    1 out of 15 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 20, 2010

    AMAZING!!!

    Beth Moore is always capable of teaching while being real. She is always albe to present very serious life-changing material with humor. This book is good for absolutely anyone who wants to better themselves, and they will be able to actually enjoy the journey as they go.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 30, 2013

    Love!

    I have the 'teen edition' of this. I LOVED it! A must get!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 10, 2013

    3 star

    I have enjoyed Beth Moore Bible Studies in the past however, I found this book and study more of a self help - identify the problem - type of book . We had good discussions but I would have liked a deeper look into the solution for Insecurity - understanding and growing in a knowledge of who we are in Christ.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 27, 2013

    awesome!

    life altering book!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 6, 2012

    This book is wonderful!!

    This book has helped in my everyday life! Its a must read. Beth moore is amazing.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted September 2, 2012

    Relevant read

    Wish I could give a copy to every woman!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 30, 2012

    awesome

    GREAT READ!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 9, 2012

    Whisperstar to icekit andother

    Nursery is the next result i the col eader of this clan

    0 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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