So Many Fish So Little Time: 1001 of the World's Greatest Backcountry Honeyholes, Trout Rivers, Blue Ribbon Waters, Bass Lakes, and Saltwater Hotspots by Mark D. Williams, Paperback | Barnes & Noble
So Many Fish So Little Time: 1001 of the World's Greatest Backcountry Honeyholes, Trout Rivers, Blue Ribbon Waters, Bass Lakes, and Saltwater Hotspots
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So Many Fish So Little Time: 1001 of the World's Greatest Backcountry Honeyholes, Trout Rivers, Blue Ribbon Waters, Bass Lakes, and Saltwater Hotspots

by Mark D. Williams
     
 

Ever dreamed of following in Hemingway's footsteps and fishing in the Basque country of Spain? Or casting your line in the urban jungle of New York City? How about reeling in a 150-lb. tarpon off the coast of Florida?

In So Many Fish, So Little Time, expert fisherman Mark D. Williams takes you to the 1,001 places all anglers should visit before they go to

Overview

Ever dreamed of following in Hemingway's footsteps and fishing in the Basque country of Spain? Or casting your line in the urban jungle of New York City? How about reeling in a 150-lb. tarpon off the coast of Florida?

In So Many Fish, So Little Time, expert fisherman Mark D. Williams takes you to the 1,001 places all anglers should visit before they go to that great fishing paradise in the sky. From milkfish in the Seychelles to sailfish off Guatemala to Arctic char at the top of the world, he'll take you on a lively and informative trip to the most beautiful, bountiful, and fish-laden waters in the world. The only angler's guide to essential places to fish that covers the entire world, So Many Fish, So Little Time is truly a fish tale like no other.

Editorial Reviews

"Shall I go to Heaven or a-fishing?" asked Henry David Thoreau. For millions of men and women, angling is one of earthly life's incomparable joys. Mark Williams's 880-page extravaganza identifies more than 1,000 prime fishing destinations around the world, some of them little known even to sport aficionados. This breakthrough paperback original identifies little-known fishing hotspots from urban New York City to the far reaches of the Pacific.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780060882396
Publisher:
HarperCollins Publishers
Publication date:
05/08/2007
Pages:
882
Sales rank:
718,014
Product dimensions:
7.50(w) x 9.25(h) x 1.74(d)

Read an Excerpt

So Many Fish, So Little Time
1001 of the World's Greatest Backcountry Honeyholes, Trout Rivers, Blue Ribbon Waters, Bass Lakes, and Saltwater Hot Spots

Chapter One

Northeast

Connecticut

I don't have a Connecticut patch. The trailer-park side of my family comes out in me more times than I want and one way it manifests is that I iron and sew patches on my ratty old fishing vest.

My late father-in-law Fred gave me my fishing vest as a Christmas present the year he died. My vest is no longer khaki; more a drab gray. Every pocket is frayed. The Velcro on the pockets rarely works anymore. Last count, the vest had five holes of significance. Leftover crumbs sit, powdery, in every pocket, vestiges of orange peanut butter-cheese crackers or what I usually call lunch on the stream. Second nature after all these years, I know where everything is on the vest: my extra Chapstick, ibuprofen, sinus pills, several safety pins, thread and needle (I pretend I might have to one day sew up a wound which, if I or a fishing buddy ever did need that kind of medical attention, I do not think I would be able to do, at least not sober), toilet paper, wet wipes, five fly boxes, leaders, tippet, tiny shreds of my wife Amy's pantyhose I used to attach to flies as shucks, beef jerky wrappers, Xink, floatant, nippers, forceps, receipts from the road trip in '92 to the Driftless, splitshot, foam indicators, leaves and dried flowers I collect to give to Amy to show I am thinking about her but forget to give her, and an extra pair of clip-on polarized sunglasses. And most important, on this multipocketed fishing ragtag vest, for reasons beyond my control,all the patches.

From Idaho to New York, Cozumel to France, the patches are attached in various stages to my vest, on the shoulders, the pockets, under the armholes. Some have completely torn off but their die stained the vest after being dunked or rained upon and you can easily tell that a Bow River patch used to cling there. Some are curled up and threaten to fall off at any moment. Others are sewn in addition to being ironed on but they know that on this threadbare vest they could be expelled soon.

I don't have a Connecticut patch. I went all the way for a Northeast angling sojourn and had a blast that spring but I never got on the Farmington for the deluge, three days of heavy rain, and not the kind in which you can fish. If I don't fish it, I don't get a patch.

My patching habit is kinda reminiscent of those slow recreational vehicles you see on the road, the RVs you are behind on this single-lane road, the ones from the 1960s, beaten and worn, with a thousand colorful decals and stickers on the back so you can see all the neat places they have visited in their rust-bucket. You know sure as shootin' that the largest two stickers plastered on the RV will be from Yellowstone National Park and Good Sam's RV Club. KOAs are big players on these moving murals, too.

Maybe I am into this patch thing for the goal-oriented spirit, to satiate my list-making tendencies. Whatever it is, I have to guard my vest at home because Amy has threatened to throw it away. "It looks like rats have gotten ahold of it," she complains. Maybe they have, I don't know. But even so, it's a perfectly good vest. I'll get a Connecticut patch one day. I just hope the vest makes it long enough to iron or sew it on.

Farmington River

  • Location: North central Connecticut
  • What You Fish For: Brown and rainbow trout
  • Highlights and Notables: The holdover trout reach trophy size

Farmington is one of the finest brown trout rivers in the East. The river is not an angler's homerun rising-up-the-charts bestseller but a solid novel that will keep selling a goodly number of copies each year.

Located in north central Connecticut, this medium- to large-sized river is one of the more picturesque, what with the clear river passing under covered bridges, past green forests and through rolling hills out in the peaceful countryside and all. Despite two dams, the Farmington doesn't suffer from major water fluctuations. Accessibility on the Farmington is a positive since the river has roads following it and intersecting it.

Two Trout Management Areas (TMAs) on the river were meant to create trophy trout and it appears they are doing their job. The upper reaches of the Farmington provide a wilderness setting that belies its proximity to the cities. Most don't believe that a river this close to major populated areas can be a fishery of quality trout fishing. They're sadly mistaken. The Farmington gets cold water releases from dams that keep the river fishable even through the hot days in summer.

With the cold water, the prolific insect hatches, plenty of holding water (pockets, pools, riffles), and the river management, it's no wonder the Farmington provides a healthy population of brown, rainbow, and brook trout. The holdover browns and rainbows reach 16 to 20 inches and they are able to hide out well—18-inch trout on the Farmington are reported daily, it seems.

The West Branch out of Hogback is one of the top streams in the East. The river's two branches meet in New Hartford and the Farmington fishes well to Lower Collinsville Dam. Farmington enjoys solid mayfly and caddis hatches.

Contacts

Classic and Custom Fly Shop,
New Hartford,
classicandcustomflyshop.com
UpCountry Sportfishing, New Hartford,
farmingtonriver.com
Quiet Sports, Collinsville, 860-693-2214

Housatonic River

  • Location: Western half of Connecticut, north to south
  • What You Fish For: Brown and rainbow trout, smallmouth bass
  • Highlights and Notables: Some of the most prolific hatches in the East. Big river with plenty of access and challenging fishing

For several of my friends, the Housatonic is their favorite river in the East. The Housatonic is a real joy to fish, miles and miles virtually unfished. The river is photogenic with its covered bridges, green riverside forests, and big boulders tossed out in the river with no rhyme or reason. Thick green tops of trees and green small trees form a 3-D multitextured wall of all the shades of green on a color wheel. This tailwater runs north to south in the western half of Connecticut and this river's beauty is accented by shady banks and boulders as big as my Uncle Bob.

So Many Fish, So Little Time
1001 of the World's Greatest Backcountry Honeyholes, Trout Rivers, Blue Ribbon Waters, Bass Lakes, and Saltwater Hot Spots
. Copyright © by Mark Williams. Reprinted by permission of HarperCollins Publishers, Inc. All rights reserved. Available now wherever books are sold.

Meet the Author

Avid angler Mark D. Williams is the author of five books, including the Trout Fishing Sourcebook, The Nuts 'N' Bolts Guide for the Backpacking Flyfisher, and The Nuts 'N' Bolts Guide to Knots for Fly-Fishers.

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