So What Can I Eat!: How to Make Sense of the New Dietary Guidelines for Americans and Make Them Your Own

Overview

A blueprint for developing a nutritious, balanced eating plan for life

Every day, readers are presented with conflicting information about food, nutrition, and how to eat properly. Now, Elisa Zied, a highly visible spokesperson for the American Dietetic Association, clarifies the new U.S. Dietary Guidelines and provides a clear plan for developing a nutritious, balanced, and sustainable eating-plan for life–whether the goal is to lose weight, have more energy, or manage or ...

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So What Can I Eat!: How to Make Sense of the New Dietary Guidelines for Americans and Make Them Your Own

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Overview

A blueprint for developing a nutritious, balanced eating plan for life

Every day, readers are presented with conflicting information about food, nutrition, and how to eat properly. Now, Elisa Zied, a highly visible spokesperson for the American Dietetic Association, clarifies the new U.S. Dietary Guidelines and provides a clear plan for developing a nutritious, balanced, and sustainable eating-plan for life–whether the goal is to lose weight, have more energy, or manage or prevent diet-related conditions. The book’s helpful menu plans and many delicious recipes will allow readers to enjoy eating without feeling deprived.

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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
* For befuddled readers wanting to "clarify the often conflicting information you hear every day about food and nutrition," this book will serve as a usable resource in the pursuit of better health. Zied, who says, "I'm a registered dietitian, not a food cop," reveals a list of changes to the guidelines of yore, pointing out, for instance, the addition of "discretionary calories," which can be used on treats or second helpings. But there's a lot of information here, and the book's seven-step plan for determining actual versus necessary calorie intake, which requires some work, may deter casual dieters. Many of the book's assertions aren't surprising (a balanced diet plus exercise equals better health; moderation is key), but discussions of RDIs (Reference Daily Intakes, a set of references regarding the recommended dietary allowances for essential vitamins and minerals) and common terms on food labels (e.g., what makes a food "low calorie") may offer new insights even to super-healthy sorts. Those readers will also benefit from the detailed shopping list, menu plans, suggestions for dining out and host of recipes designed to aid in better health through education and practice. (Mar.) (Publishers Weekly, January 16, 2006)
Publishers Weekly
For befuddled readers wanting to "clarify the often conflicting information you hear every day about food and nutrition," this book will serve as a usable resource in the pursuit of better health. Zied, who says, "I'm a registered dietitian, not a food cop," reveals a list of changes to the guidelines of yore, pointing out, for instance, the addition of "discretionary calories," which can be used on treats or second helpings. But there's a lot of information here, and the book's seven-step plan for determining actual versus necessary calorie intake, which requires some work, may deter casual dieters. Many of the book's assertions aren't surprising (a balanced diet plus exercise equals better health; moderation is key), but discussions of RDIs (Reference Daily Intakes, a set of references regarding the recommended dietary allowances for essential vitamins and minerals) and common terms on food labels (e.g., what makes a food "low calorie") may offer new insights even to super-healthy sorts. Those readers will also benefit from the detailed shopping list, menu plans, suggestions for dining out and host of recipes designed to aid in better health through education and practice. (Mar.) Copyright 2006 Reed Business Information.
Library Journal
Forty years ago, everyone knew that eating healthy meant consuming balanced portions from each of the four food groups and cutting calories to lose weight. Today, we have a food pyramid with steps running up one side; the supermarkets are crammed with low-fat, low-carb, low-sugar concoctions; and yet we as a country are fatter than ever. What happened? These two books try to cut through the confusion to map out the basic facts of human nutrition and weight control. Dietitian Zied (spokesperson, American Dietetic Assn.) and science writer Winter (A Consumer's Dictionary of Cosmetic Ingredients) take a scientific approach, explaining the new U.S. dietary guidelines and demonstrating how the revised food pyramid can be adapted for each individual. Tables show age and activity levels for determining one's optimal caloric intake, and different foods are analyzed for the development of a personal menu plan. Light (former director, USDA Dietary Guidance & Nutrition Education Research), on the other hand, forgoes the technical stuff, opting instead for a flexible diet and exercise schedule. She also realistically addresses eating out and on the run. Both books include menus and recipes, and both provide useful tips for trimming empty calories from one's intake. Both emphasize the necessity of exercise, but neither mandates specific activities. Either would be a good choice for public libraries, depending on the education level of their clientele.-Susan B. Hagloch, formerly with the Tuscarawas Cty. P.L., New Philadelphia, OH Copyright 2006 Reed Business Information.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780471772019
  • Publisher: Turner Publishing Company
  • Publication date: 2/24/2006
  • Edition description: First Edition
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 224
  • Sales rank: 1,427,562
  • Product dimensions: 5.50 (w) x 8.40 (h) x 0.60 (d)

Meet the Author

Elisa Zied
Elisa Zied, R.D. is a registered dietitian and national media spokesperson for ADA.  An expert on family nutrition, she has been extensively featured on broadcast television, in several national publications, and in high-profile speaking roles promoting a healthy lifestyle.  She is a contributing editor for Seventeen magazine and has written for or been quoted in Time, The New York Times, US News & World Report, Los Angeles Times, Fitness Magazine, Parenting Magazine, and Self, among others.  She appears regularly on CBS’s The Early Show as well as Today in New York, Good Day New York, Live on MSNBC, Fox News Live and Fox News at 10.

Ruth Winter, M.S., is an award-winning science and nutrition writer. Her books include A Consumer's Dictionary of Food Additives.
Visit her Web site at brainbody.com.

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Table of Contents

Acknowledgments.

Introduction.

Part One: So What Are the Guidelines and How Can You Fit Them into Your Life?

1. Sitting Down to Dinner with Uncle Sam.

2. How to Make the Guidelines Your Own in 7 Steps.

3. All Foods Can Fit.

4. Moving toward a Healthier Weight.

5. Picks and Pitfalls of the Market.

6. Dining Out without Giving In 98

Part Two: What You Can Eat: Easy Menus and Mouth-Watering Recipes.

7. Your Meal Plan.

8. Recipes.

Appendix A: Master Food Lists.

Appendix B: Determining Your Calorie Needs.

Resources.

References.

Index.

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Sort by: Showing all of 6 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 7, 2006

    You will learn so much

    I learned so much about how to read food labels and about the different types of fats. The recipes were delicious and easy to make. It is a great book!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 5, 2006

    A Sensible book for a healthy lifestyle

    I like the fact that the primary focus is on the nutritional quality of the foods yoiu eat. Concern with calorie intake, while important, is secondary to choosing nutrient rich foods. Elisa Zied also emphaisizes that any food is ok to eat as long as you indulge in moderation. This common sense approach, based on moderation and a focus on quality, really takes the guilt and sacrifice component out of making a healthy eating plan. I also like the book because it describes the health benefits of various foods. I love collecting recipes and have done so for almost 20 years. Nevertheless, I found some recipes in the book which were unique enough to make an exciting and delicious addition to my collection!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 26, 2006

    Just what the doctor ordered!

    We finally have a book that we can recommend to patients that can help them modify their life styles in a realistic manner. There are no gimmicks and no hard and fast rules...just sensible nutritional advice. This book actually becomes a usable guide as normal people eat their way through their normal lives!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 19, 2006

    Just what I needed

    Finally! This is the first nutrition book that actually approaches diet and nutrition in a manageable way. Zied helps demystify the new nutrition pyramid, while creating a framework in which the reader can personally apply it to his or her daily life. The `Daily Food and Fitness Tracker¿ is by far the easiest and most flexible method of monitoring my food intake and activity level that I have come across. The author makes you feel as if she has been in the same place you have in terms of managing weight and eating habits. Unlike so many other books that seem to focus solely on weight loss, Zied seems focused on improving health and quality of life. By not eliminating entire food groups from your diet, she helps to promote a sustainable lifestyle change and not a `quick fix.¿ The stories and anecdotes throughout the book make it an easy read. Zied responds to every question you have before they even come up. The section on eating out and meal plans are very easy to follow and are useful. Unlike other books of this type, the recipes are actually foods you¿d want to eat and enjoy in your everyday life¿.we tried `Linda¿s Chicken Meatballs¿ and loved them.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 6, 2006

    A guide for real people

    This book cuts through the noise, focusing on the truly important nutritional facts Americans need to know. The practical approach is realistic and the book's message is positive and encouraging. The recipes and meal plans are very helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 17, 2009

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Sort by: Showing all of 6 Customer Reviews

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