So What Can I Eat!: How to Make Sense of the New Dietary Guidelines for Americans and Make Them Your Own

So What Can I Eat!: How to Make Sense of the New Dietary Guidelines for Americans and Make Them Your Own

by Elisa Zied
     
 

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"So What Can I Eat? personalizes the latest dietary recommendations and really makes them work for you. Positive, attainable, and gimmick-free, it is like having Elisa as your very own dietitian!"
—Ellie Krieger, M.S., R.D., host of the Food Network's Healthy Appetite and author of Small Changes, Big Results

Go ahead, eat some chocolate

Overview

"So What Can I Eat? personalizes the latest dietary recommendations and really makes them work for you. Positive, attainable, and gimmick-free, it is like having Elisa as your very own dietitian!"
—Ellie Krieger, M.S., R.D., host of the Food Network's Healthy Appetite and author of Small Changes, Big Results

Go ahead, eat some chocolate. Have some butter. Enjoy a glass of wine with dinner. As a matter of fact, there really isn't anything you can't eat, according to the new Dietary Guidelines for Americans. So What Can I Eat?! helps you make sense of the new guidelines and provides an easy-to-follow seven-step plan for balancing good nutrition with some of your favorite indulgences. It includes:

  • Two weeks' worth of easy-to-prepare meals
  • Mouthwatering recipes that can fit easily into your personal eating plan
  • Shopping tips to help you navigate through grocery aisles and interpret food labels
  • Practical ideas for what to order when you're eating out or grabbing takeout

Whether your goal is to lose weight, have more energy, or provide healthful meals for your family, So What Can I Eat?! is your gateway to a healthier lifestyle.

"If you, like most Americans, are confused about what to eat, this is a must-have book for you. Elisa shows you in a simple, practical way how to make better food choices without having to spend lots of extra time and effort, and without giving up the foods you love. This is a book that really makes sense."
—James O. Hill, Ph.D., director of the Center for Human Nutrition at the University of Colorado, and coauthor of The Step Diet

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
For befuddled readers wanting to "clarify the often conflicting information you hear every day about food and nutrition," this book will serve as a usable resource in the pursuit of better health. Zied, who says, "I'm a registered dietitian, not a food cop," reveals a list of changes to the guidelines of yore, pointing out, for instance, the addition of "discretionary calories," which can be used on treats or second helpings. But there's a lot of information here, and the book's seven-step plan for determining actual versus necessary calorie intake, which requires some work, may deter casual dieters. Many of the book's assertions aren't surprising (a balanced diet plus exercise equals better health; moderation is key), but discussions of RDIs (Reference Daily Intakes, a set of references regarding the recommended dietary allowances for essential vitamins and minerals) and common terms on food labels (e.g., what makes a food "low calorie") may offer new insights even to super-healthy sorts. Those readers will also benefit from the detailed shopping list, menu plans, suggestions for dining out and host of recipes designed to aid in better health through education and practice. (Mar.) Copyright 2006 Reed Business Information.
Library Journal
Forty years ago, everyone knew that eating healthy meant consuming balanced portions from each of the four food groups and cutting calories to lose weight. Today, we have a food pyramid with steps running up one side; the supermarkets are crammed with low-fat, low-carb, low-sugar concoctions; and yet we as a country are fatter than ever. What happened? These two books try to cut through the confusion to map out the basic facts of human nutrition and weight control. Dietitian Zied (spokesperson, American Dietetic Assn.) and science writer Winter (A Consumer's Dictionary of Cosmetic Ingredients) take a scientific approach, explaining the new U.S. dietary guidelines and demonstrating how the revised food pyramid can be adapted for each individual. Tables show age and activity levels for determining one's optimal caloric intake, and different foods are analyzed for the development of a personal menu plan. Light (former director, USDA Dietary Guidance & Nutrition Education Research), on the other hand, forgoes the technical stuff, opting instead for a flexible diet and exercise schedule. She also realistically addresses eating out and on the run. Both books include menus and recipes, and both provide useful tips for trimming empty calories from one's intake. Both emphasize the necessity of exercise, but neither mandates specific activities. Either would be a good choice for public libraries, depending on the education level of their clientele.-Susan B. Hagloch, formerly with the Tuscarawas Cty. P.L., New Philadelphia, OH Copyright 2006 Reed Business Information.
From the Publisher
* For befuddled readers wanting to "clarify the often conflicting information you hear every day about food and nutrition," this book will serve as a usable resource in the pursuit of better health. Zied, who says, "I'm a registered dietitian, not a food cop," reveals a list of changes to the guidelines of yore, pointing out, for instance, the addition of "discretionary calories," which can be used on treats or second helpings. But there's a lot of information here, and the book's seven-step plan for determining actual versus necessary calorie intake, which requires some work, may deter casual dieters. Many of the book's assertions aren't surprising (a balanced diet plus exercise equals better health; moderation is key), but discussions of RDIs (Reference Daily Intakes, a set of references regarding the recommended dietary allowances for essential vitamins and minerals) and common terms on food labels (e.g., what makes a food "low calorie") may offer new insights even to super-healthy sorts. Those readers will also benefit from the detailed shopping list, menu plans, suggestions for dining out and host of recipes designed to aid in better health through education and practice. (Mar.) (Publishers Weekly, January 16, 2006)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780471772019
Publisher:
Turner Publishing Company
Publication date:
02/24/2006
Edition description:
First Edition
Pages:
224
Product dimensions:
5.50(w) x 8.40(h) x 0.60(d)

Related Subjects

Meet the Author

Elisa Zied, R.D. is a registered dietitian and national media spokesperson for ADA.  An expert on family nutrition, she has been extensively featured on broadcast television, in several national publications, and in high-profile speaking roles promoting a healthy lifestyle.  She is a contributing editor for Seventeen magazine and has written for or been quoted in Time, The New York Times, US News & World Report, Los Angeles Times, Fitness Magazine, Parenting Magazine, and Self, among others.  She appears regularly on CBS’s The Early Show as well as Today in New York, Good Day New York, Live on MSNBC, Fox News Live and Fox News at 10.

Ruth Winter, M.S., is an award-winning science and nutrition writer. Her books include A Consumer's Dictionary of Food Additives.
Visit her Web site at brainbody.com.

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