So You Think You Know Antietam?: The Stories Behind America's Bloodiest Day
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So You Think You Know Antietam?: The Stories Behind America's Bloodiest Day

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by James Gindlesperger, Suzanne Gindlesperger
     
 

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As Clara Barton, "the Angel of the Battlefield," knelt to give a wounded soldier a drink of water, a bullet passed through her sleeve and struck her unfortunate patient in the chest, killing him almost instantly.

Such are the stories from the Battle of Antietam, the bloodiest one-day conflict in United States history, during which 23,000 soldiers were killed,

Overview

As Clara Barton, "the Angel of the Battlefield," knelt to give a wounded soldier a drink of water, a bullet passed through her sleeve and struck her unfortunate patient in the chest, killing him almost instantly.

Such are the stories from the Battle of Antietam, the bloodiest one-day conflict in United States history, during which 23,000 soldiers were killed, wounded, or missing over the course of 12 hours. General George McClellan's inaction following the battle earned him a forced retirement, while six other generals lost their lives in combat. Ultimately, President Abraham Lincoln used the tenuous Union victory as leverage to issue the Emancipation Proclamation.

In So You Thing You Know Antietam? authors James and Suzanne Gindlesperger draw on their visits to the battlefield and their extensive research in conjunction with the National Park Service to honor the men who served.

Readers will become acquainted with Antietam's 96 monuments and will learn:

Who the "Red Legged Devils," the "Black Devils," and the "Jackass Battery" were, and how they earned their nicknames

What a "witness tree" is, and where to find one

The poignant story of 13-year-old drummer boy Charles King, believed to be the youngest casualty from either army

Boasting nearly 300 color photos, 10 color-coded chapters and maps, and GPS coordinates of all monument locations, So You Think You Know Antietam? is the perfect companion fro a first or 15th visit to one of America's most famous battlefields.

Editorial Reviews

Library Journal
Following in the footsteps of their similarly titled book on Gettysburg, James and Suzanne Gindlesperger have provided another detailed guide to a Civil War battlefield. Replete with color photographs, the chapters detail Antietam's various landmarks and sites. Rather than telling the story of the battle itself, the authors instead relate the histories of specific locations and the meaning behind each monument. Chapters begin with MapQuest maps that contain numbers for each site mentioned in the text. Following are snippets of the day's events in that area, then the stories behind each location. Included are appendixes that contain Gen. Lee's lost orders, orders of battle for both Confederate and Union forces, and the names of each of the battle's Medal of Honor recipients, along with the citations describing their actions. VERDICT Civil War history buffs and reenactors eager to know more about the battlefield itself should find this a worthwhile addition.—MJW

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780895875792
Publisher:
Blair, John F. Publisher
Publication date:
09/01/2012
Pages:
224
Sales rank:
1,309,124
Product dimensions:
7.90(w) x 7.68(h) x 0.44(d)

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So You Think You Know Antietam?: The Stories Behind America's Bloodiest Day 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
civiwarlibrarian More than 1 year ago
So You Think You Know Antietam? The Stories Behind America's Bloodiest Day offers descriptions and photographs of 129 monuments and sites on the Antietam/Sharpsburg battlefield. GPS coordinates are given for every site. Much of the photography is in color with several black and white wartime images, including portraits of officers. Included are the Lincoln-McClellan Meeting site, the farms, special topographic features such as the Rock Ledge in the West Woods, the Antietam train station, Lee's headquarters, Sharpsburg's Slave Block, and the National Cemetery. War Department markers, wayside markers, artillery pieces, hospitals, fences, and reenactors are briefly described in the final chapter. The appendices includes the full text of Lee's Special Orders 191, the Federal and Confederate Orders of Battle, and the U.S. Congressional Medal of Honor winners.