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So You're New Again: How to Succeed when You Change Jobs (Managing Work Transition Series) / Edition 1
     

So You're New Again: How to Succeed when You Change Jobs (Managing Work Transition Series) / Edition 1

5.0 1
by Elwood F Holton, Sharon S Naquin
 

ISBN-10: 1583761691

ISBN-13: 9781583761694

Pub. Date: 01/28/2001

Publisher: Berrett-Koehler Publishers, Inc.

In the current fast-paced world, people change jobs more frequently than ever. The ability to thrive in new environments is key to career success. This book provides the tools essential to job transitions, showing readers how to make a good impression on a new employer.

Overview

In the current fast-paced world, people change jobs more frequently than ever. The ability to thrive in new environments is key to career success. This book provides the tools essential to job transitions, showing readers how to make a good impression on a new employer.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781583761694
Publisher:
Berrett-Koehler Publishers, Inc.
Publication date:
01/28/2001
Series:
Managing Work Transition Series
Edition description:
First Edition
Pages:
78
Sales rank:
490,793
Product dimensions:
6.04(w) x 9.00(h) x 0.29(d)

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So You're New Again: How to Succeed when You Change Jobs (Managing Work Transition Series) 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Authors Elwood F. Holton III and Sharon S. Naquin, both academics, invested substantial research to produce a little book that might just solve the very big midlife quandaries faced by workers whose jobs have been downsized or exported to another country. People who thought they would never need to take a different job find themselves the new person in a new office again, with no tools to help them cope other than the lessons of the corporate culture they left behind. However, using old cultural information in a new place is the road to disaster, according to the learned authors, who do a fine job of explaining why. Businesses are culture clubs and new hires must learn to get along before they can get ahead. At fewer than 100 pages, this is, nevertheless, a little redundant. Perhaps we need to hear the bell ring clearly, over and over, for the content is useful stuff simply told. For that reason, We recommend this to anyone contemplating a move, to every new hire and to every HR officer as part of the pre-employment package given to all experienced applicants.