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SOA Governance: Achieving and Sustaining Business and IT Agility [NOOK Book]

Overview

Address the #1 Success Factor in SOA Implementations: Effective, Business-Driven Governance

 

Inadequate governance might be the most widespread root cause of SOA failure. In SOA Governance, a team of IBM’s leading SOA governance experts share hard-won best practices for governing IT in any service-oriented environment.

 

The authors begin by introducing a comprehensive SOA governance model that has worked in the field. They define ...

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SOA Governance: Achieving and Sustaining Business and IT Agility

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Overview

Address the #1 Success Factor in SOA Implementations: Effective, Business-Driven Governance

 

Inadequate governance might be the most widespread root cause of SOA failure. In SOA Governance, a team of IBM’s leading SOA governance experts share hard-won best practices for governing IT in any service-oriented environment.

 

The authors begin by introducing a comprehensive SOA governance model that has worked in the field. They define what must be governed, identify key stakeholders, and review the relationship of SOA governance to existing governance bodies as well as governance frameworks like COBIT. Next, they walk you through SOA governance assessment and planning, identifying and fixing gaps, setting goals and objectives, and establishing workable roadmaps and governance deliverables. Finally, the authors detail the build-out of the SOA governance model with a case study.

 

The authors illuminate the unique issues associated with applying IT governance to a services model, including the challenges of compliance auditing when service behavior is inherently unpredictable. They also show why services governance requires a more organizational, business-centric focus than “conventional” IT governance.


Coverage includes

  • Understanding the problems SOA governance needs to solve
  • Establishing and governing service production lines that automate SOA development activities
  • Identifying reusable elements of your existing IT governance model and prioritizing improvements 
  • Establishing SOA authority chains, roles, responsibilities, policies, standards, mechanisms, procedures, and metrics
  • Implementing service versioning and granularity
  • Refining SOA governance frameworks to maintain their vitality as business and IT strategies change
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780137002931
  • Publisher: Pearson Education
  • Publication date: 1/2/2009
  • Series: IBM Press
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 416
  • File size: 5 MB

Meet the Author

William A. Brown is a Master Sr. Certified Executive IT Architect with IBM Global Business Services, Enterprise Architecture & Technology Center of Excellence, and the SOA Center of Excellence. He is the SOA Governance SGMM global lead and the lead author of IBM’s SOA Governance and Management Method (SGMM), SOA CoE Offering, white papers, presentation, and technique papers on SOA governance. Mr. Brown specializes in SOA governance and enterprise architecture, about which he continues to write articles, provide education, mentor, teach, present, develop assets, and deliver solutions to customers worldwide.

Robert G. Laird is an architect with IBM in the SOA Advanced Technologies group, performing worldwide consulting for IBM customers in the area of SOA governance, SOA architecture, and telco architecture. He has previously coauthored Executing SOA for Pearson Publishing, and has also written white papers and articles on SOA and SOA governance. He has more than 30 years of industry and consulting experience. Bob worked at MCI (a U.S. telco) as the chief architect, where he led the Enterprise Architecture group and the creation of an SOA-based single-stack strategy for multiple legacy applications and networks, and led automation projects in network management, provisioning, and restoration. He also consulted nationally for American Management Systems.

Clive Gee, Ph.D., one of IBM’s most experienced SOA governance practitioners, recently retired from his post as an Executive Consultant in the SOA Advanced Technologies group. He has worked in IT for more than 30 years, during the last few of which he led many SOA implementation and governance engagements for major clients all around the world, helping them to cope with the complexities of successfully transitioning to SOA. He now lives in Shetland, United Kingdom, but travels widely and does freelance consulting, especially in the area of SOA governance.

Tilak Mitra is a Senior Certified Executive IT Architect with IBM Global Business Services working very closely with the worldwide SOA Center of Excellence group in IBM. He specializes in SOAs, helping IBM in its business strategy and direction, fostering the maturity of SOA in the company. He also works as an SOA subject matter expert and architect, helping clients in their SOA-based business transformation, with a focus on complex and large-scale enterprise architectures. His current focus is on building SOA solutions for the chemicals and petroleum industry to optimize oil drilling and refinery processes. He has coauthored Executing SOA for Pearson Publishing, and has written several white papers and articles on SOA and SOA governance. He is a contributing editor of the Java Developers Journal (JDJ).

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Table of Contents

Introduction: A Services Approach     1

    Benefits of SOA     2

    What Goes Right?     4

    What Goes Wrong?     6

    Conclusion     9

Chapter 1: Introduction to Governance     11

    Defining Governance     12

        Corporate Governance     14

        Enterprise Governance     15

        IT Governance     15

        SOA Governance     16

    SOA Governance Paradigm     18

    IT Governance Reference Sources     22

        ITIL—Information Technology Information Library     23

        IT Governance Institute‚ (ITGI) version 4.1 of Control Objectives for Information and Related Technology (COBIT)     24

    The SOA Governance and Management Model     25

        SOA Vision     26

        Governance Processes     27

        Processes to be Governed and ESB Services Processes     30

    Governance Mechanisms     33

        Principles, Policies, Standards, and Procedures     33

        Monitors and Metrics     34

        Skills     35

        Organizational Change Management     35

        Infrastructure and Tools     35

    Case Study Background     36

        Company Background     36

        Business Goals     38

    Conclusion    40

Chapter 2: SOA Governance Assessment and Planning     41

    Setting the Vision     42

        What Distinguishes the SOA Winners?     43

        Antipatterns: Common SOA Pitfalls     46

    SOA Governance Capabilities     50

        Plan & Organize     50

        Program Management Controls     53

        Service Development Lifecycle    54

        Service Operations     56

    Understanding the Patient’s History     57

    Understanding the Patient’s Symptoms and Diagnosing the Root Causes     60

        Program Management Controls     64

        Service Development Lifecycle     66

        Service Operations     67

    Determine the Patient’s Ability to Accept the Treatment Needed to Effect a Cure     68

        Organization Type     69

        Suitability Considerations     70

        Determining the Governance Priorities and Near-Term Goals     73

    Case Study     84

        SOA Planning Assessment     84

    Conclusion     88

Chapter 3: Building the Service Factory     89

    How to Succeed with SOA     90

        A Divide-and-Conquer Approach to Managing Complexity     91

        The Case for Creating a Service Factory     94

        Populating the Service Factory: Roles and Responsibilities     97

    The SOA “Plan & Organize” Domain     114

        SOA Plan & Organize Domain Work-Product Definitions     121

    The SOA Program Management Controls Domain     146

        Program Management Controls Domain Work Product Definitions     152

    Case Study     161

        Service Transformation Planning 161

    Conclusion    163

Chapter 4: Governing the Service Factory     165

    Essential Competencies for Succeeding with SOA     166

        Effective Requirements Collection     166

        Competency in Service Design     167

        Competency in Service Development     167

        Competency in Service Testing and Deployment     168

        Competency in Operational Management and Monitoring of Services     168

    Service Development Lifecycle Control Points     168

        Business Requirements and Service Identification Control Point     172

        Solution Architecture Control Point     173

        Service Specification Control Point     174

        Service Design Control Point     174

        Service Vitality Control Point     177

    The Service Development Domain     178

        Key Capabilities Needed to Govern Service Development     179

        Service Development Domain Work Product Definitions     183

    The Service Operations Domain     201

        Key SOA Governance Tasks Involved in Operating Services     201

        Service Operations Domain Work Product Definitions     203

    Case Study     209

        Service Development Lifecycle Controls     209

        Control Gates for Ideation     210

    Conclusion     217

Chapter 5: Implementing the SOA Governance Model     219

    A Model for SOA Governance     220

        SOA Governance Staffing     221

        SOA Governance Implementation Timeline     223

    The Plan Phase     223

        Activity 1.1: Project Startup     224

        Activity 1.2: SOA Business Discovery     227

        Activity 1.3: Determine IT Governance Environment Readiness 229

        Activity 1.4: Define Scope of SOA Governance and Management Model     231

    The Define Phase     235

        Activity 2.1: Refine SOA Principles     236

        Activity 2.2: Modify the Existing Governance Organizational Model and Create the SOA CoE     237

        Activity 2.3 Define or Modify Governance Processes     240

        Activity 2.4: Define Processes to Be Governed and Close SOA Governance Capability Gaps     242

        Activity 2.5: Define SOA Governance Infrastructure and Tools     245

        Activity 2.6: Create SOA Governance Plans    247

    Enable Phase     249

        Task 3.1: Execute Enable     250

    Measure Phase     256

        Activity 4.1: Execute Measurement     257

    Case Study     260

        Service Processes, Organizations, Roles, and Responsibilities     260

        Service Ownership and Funding     263

    Conclusion     264

Chapter 6: Managing the Service Lifecycle     265

    Preparing for the Requirements Capture and Service Identification Control Point     267

        Capturing Requirements “Top Down”     267

        Capturing Business Requirements “Bottom Up”     270

        Service Identification     271

    Preparing for the Solution Architecture Control Point     277

    Preparing for the Service Specification Control Point     278

    Preparing for the Service Design Control Point     279

    Preparing for the Service Realization Control Point     281

    Preparing for the Service Testing Control Point     282

    Preparing for the Service Certification and Deployment Control Point     283

    Preparing for the Service Vitality Control Point     285

    Service and Process Lifecycles: Overview     285

    Regulating Service Granularity     287

        Step 1. Are the Candidate Operations Tasks or Services?     288

        Step 2. Can the Candidate Operations Be Automated?     294

        Step 3. Are the Candidate Operations Really Reusable?     295

        Step 4. Are the Scopes of Each Candidate Operation Realistic?     297

        Step 5. Does Each Candidate Operation Have Visible Business Value?     299

        Notes on Granularity of Data-Related Services 299

    Managing Service Versioning     301

        Designing Future-Proof Services     302

        Communicating with Service Consumers     303

    Case Study     304

        Service Certification      304

    Conclusion      307

Chapter 7: Governance Vitality     309

    Goals and Measurements     310

    Governance Reporting     318

    Feedback for Continuous Improvement     321

    Case Study     325

        Service Governance Vitality     325

        Case Study Conclusion     328

    Conclusion    328

Chapter 8: SOA Governance Case Study     329

    Introduction: Case Study Background     330

    SOA Governance Assessment and Planning     333

        SOA Planning Assessment     334

    Building the Service Factory     337

        Service Transformation Planning     337

    Governing the Service Factory     340

        Service Development Lifecycle Controls     340

        Control Gates for Ideation     341

    Implementing the SOA Governance Model     348

        Service Processes, Organizations, Roles, and Responsibilities     349

        Service Ownership and Funding     351

    Managing the Service Lifecycle     353

        Service Certification     353

    Governance Vitality     356

        Service Governance Vitality     357

    Conclusion     360

Appendix A: Glossary     361

Appendix B: References     371

Index     373

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