Social Cognitive Development: Frontiers and Possible Futures

Overview

Interest in the childhood evolution of our thinking and knowledge concerning the social world is lively and growing and studies have proliferated for many years. When it was first published in 1981, this book afforded a group of distinguished social scientists the opportunity to reflect on social cognitive development and on the implications their own theoretical positions and research findings might have for this central process. One of its special strengths is the range of the contributors' backgrounds. In ...

See more details below
Paperback
$27.92
BN.com price
(Save 9%)$30.99 List Price
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (13) from $2.41   
  • New (3) from $28.78   
  • Used (10) from $2.41   
Sending request ...

Overview

Interest in the childhood evolution of our thinking and knowledge concerning the social world is lively and growing and studies have proliferated for many years. When it was first published in 1981, this book afforded a group of distinguished social scientists the opportunity to reflect on social cognitive development and on the implications their own theoretical positions and research findings might have for this central process. One of its special strengths is the range of the contributors' backgrounds. In addition to specialists, there are students of non-social cognitive development, social anthropology, the 'adult' (non-developmental) social, personality and cognitive psychology. Their readable essays thus offer compelling perspectives and approaches for those interested in the child's construction of social reality.

Read More Show Less

Product Details

Table of Contents

List of contributors; Editorial preface; 1. The 'intuitive scientist' formulation and its developmental implications Lee Ross; 2. The development of thoughts about animate and inanimate objects: implications for research on social cognition Rochel Gelman and Elizabeth Spelke; 3. Perspectives on the difference between understanding people and understanding things: the role of affect Martin L. Hoffman; 4. 'Concrete thinking' and the development of social cognition Stephen M. Kosslyn and Jerome Kagan; 5. Social cognition in a script framework Katherine Nelson; 6. Role taking and social judgment: alternative developmental perspectives and processes E. Tory Higgins; 7. Exploring children's social cognition on two fronts William Damon; 8. Relations between social cognition, nonsocial cognition, and social behavior: the case of friendship Thomas J. Berndt; 9. Self-referent thought: a developmental analysis of self-efficacy Albert Bandura; 10. Metacognition and the rules of delay Water Mischel; 11. Monitoring social cognitive enterprises: something else that may develop in the area of social cognition John H. Flavell; 12. The moral intuitions of the child Richard A. Schweder, Elliot Turiel, and Nancy C. Much; 13. Concluding remarks John H. Flavell and Lee Ross; Index.

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)