The Social Fabric, Volume II / Edition 8

The Social Fabric, Volume II / Edition 8

by John H. Cary, Julius Weinberg, Thomas L. Hartshorne, Robert A. Wheeler
     
 

ISBN-10: 0321003055

ISBN-13: 9780321003058

Pub. Date: 11/06/1998

Publisher: Addison-Wesley

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780321003058
Publisher:
Addison-Wesley
Publication date:
11/06/1998
Series:
Social Fabric Series
Edition description:
Older Edition
Pages:
338
Product dimensions:
6.26(w) x 9.09(h) x 0.83(d)

Table of Contents

VOLUME I.

(Readings that are new to this edition are indicated with an * asterisk).

I. COLONIAL AMERICANS.

1. Native Americans and the Environment.
From William Cronon, Changes in the Land: Indians, Colonists, and the Ecology of New England.

2. Slaves on the Frontier.
From Peter H. Wood, Black Majority: Negroes in Colonial South Carolina from 1670 through the Stono Rebellion.

3. Husbands and Wives.
From Lyle Koehler, A Search for Power: The "Weaker Sex" in Seventeenth-Century New England.

4. The Witchcraft Scare.
From John C Miller, This New Man, the American.

II. THE NEW NATION.

5. Native American Women — from Princesses to Wenches.
From Larry D. Eldridge, ed., Women and Freedom in Early America.

6. Indentured Servants — Voyage, Sale, Service.
From Sharon V. Salinger, "To serve well and faithfully" Labor and Indentured Servants in Pennsylvania, 1682-1800.

7. Building an Army.
From John E. Ferling, A Wilderness of Miseries: War and Warriors in Early America.

8. Social War.
From Wallace Brown, The Good Americans: Loyalists in the American Revolution.

9. Frontier Fighting: The Importance of Saving Face.
From Elliot J. Gorn, "Gouge and Bite, Pull Hair and Scratch": The Social Significance of Fighting in the Southern Backcountry.

III. THE AGE OF REFORM.

10. The Industrial Worker.
From Barbara M. Tucker, SamuelSlater and the Origins of the American Textile Industry, 1790-1860.

11. Trail of Tears.
From Dale Van Every, Disinherited: The Lost Birthright of the American Indian.

12. Disease and Treatment.
From Charles E. Rosenberg, The Cholera Years: the United States in 1832, 1849, and 1866.

13. The Affectionate Family.
From Steven Mintz and Susan Kellogg, Domestic Revolutions: A Social History of American Family Life.

14. Utopian Communes.
From Edward D. Andrews, The People Called Shakers.

PART IV INDUSTRIAL NORTH AND PLANTER SOUTH.

15. The Midwestern Farm.
From John M. Faragher, Women and Men on the Overland Trail.

16. The African-American Family.
From Leslie H. Owens, This Species of Property: Slave Life and Culture in the Old South.

17. A Nation of Immigrants.
From David A. Gerber, The Making of an American Pluralism: Buffalo, New York, 1825-60.

18. Urban Problems.
From Michael Feldberg, The Turbulent Era: Riot and Disorder in Jacksonian America.

V. WESTERN EXPANSION AND CIVIL WAR.

19. The Way West.
From John D. Unruh, Jr., The Plains Across: The Overland Emigrants and the Trans-Mississippi West, 1940-1860.

20. Native Texans — What Anglos Thought and Feared.
From Arnoldo De Leon, They Called Them Greasers: Anglo Attitudes Toward Mexicans in Texas, 1821-1900.

21. Why Soldiers went to War.
From James M. McPherson, What they Fought For, 1861-1865.

22. After Slavery.
From Joel Williamson, After Slavery: The Negro in South Carolina During Reconstruction, 1861-1877.

VOLUME II.

I. EXPANSION AND CHANGE.

23. After Slavery.
From Joel Williamson, After Slavery.

24. The Reservation and the Destruction of Indian Culture.
From Robert M. Utley, The Indian Frontier of the American West, 1846-1890.

25. The Farmers' Frontier.
From Robert V. Hine, Community on the American Frontier.

26. Labor in the Gilded Age.
From Jacquelyn Dowd Hall et al., Like a Family.

27. Labor Violence in Industrial America.
From Michael Nowak, The Guns of Lattimer.

II. REORGANIZATION AND REFORM.

28. The City at the Turn of the Century.
From David Nasaw, Children of the City.

29. Immigration and Cultural Conflict.
From Elizabeth Ewen, Immigrant Women in the Land of Dollars.

30. Immigrant Children at School.
From Selma Berrol, "Immigrant Children at School, 1880-1940: A Child's Eye View".

31. African-American Migration.
From Florette Henri, Black Migration.

III. THE TENSIONS OF PROSPERITY.

32. The Ku Klux Klan in Indiana.
From Kathleen M. Blee, Women of the Klan.

33. Mexican-Americans in the Southwest.
From Sarah Deutsch, No Separate Refuge.

34. Women and Housework in the 1920s.
From Ruth Schwartz Cowan, More Work for Mother.

IV. DEPRESSION AND WAR.

35. The Nation Confronts the Great Depression.
From Caroline Bird, The Invisible Scar.

36. Work Relief in the Great Depression.
From Edward Robb Ellis, A Nation of Torment.

37. The Home Front During World War II.
From Richard R. Lingeman, Don't You Know There's a War On?

38. The GI Bill of Rights.
From Michael J. Bennett, When Dreams Came True.

V. AFFLUENCE AND ITS DISCONTENTS.

39. The Baby Boom.
From Landon Y. Jones, Great Expectations.

40. The Struggle for Civil Rights.
From Doug McAdam, Freedom Summer.

41. The Counterculture.
From Jay Stevens, Storming Heaven.

42. Vietnam — and After.
From Loren Baritz, Backfire.

43. Sexuality in Contemporary America.
From John D'Emilio and Estelle B. Friedman, Intimate Matters.

44 Culture War.
From William Martin, With God on Our Side: The Rise of the Religious Right in America.

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