Social Foundations Of The Mass Media

Overview

Social Foundations of the Mass Media is a historical examination of the intellectual debate over the extent of permissible freedom that should be allowed for the expression and discussion of conflicting ideas. The treatment begins with the ancient Egyptian concepts, extends through Middle Eastern writings, treats the Inquisition and concludes with modern concepts in the United States. Both the church and the state have long desired to repress dissident opinion fearing that their authority would be undermined. ...

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Overview

Social Foundations of the Mass Media is a historical examination of the intellectual debate over the extent of permissible freedom that should be allowed for the expression and discussion of conflicting ideas. The treatment begins with the ancient Egyptian concepts, extends through Middle Eastern writings, treats the Inquisition and concludes with modern concepts in the United States. Both the church and the state have long desired to repress dissident opinion fearing that their authority would be undermined. They have used persecution, laws, the courts and public opinion to try to impose their ideas upon an unwilling population. Thinkers from Aristotle to Zechariah Chafee, Jr., the renowned legal scholar at Harvard University, and Hugo Black, former Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States, have had much to say about the role of journalists, writers and dissidents. Each of their ideas and those of many others appear in the Social Foundations of the Mass Media. The debate will continue well into the future, but the issues that have been raised over the centuries remain central to the debate today.

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Editorial Reviews

Media Ethics
...it is a volume that both raises ideas and settles them.
Booknews
Presents a new political philosophy to help explain concepts that define the limits of expression within the state, and offers excerpts from key documents and essays in support. Focus is on the reason for controls placed on the media, and on events and laws as they shape the role of the state in controlling the freedom of expression. In developing this philosophy, the history of the media, media law, and political philosophy are explored only as they relate to the philosophy. Material progresses from Biblical times through the American colonies to modern times, with discussion of the American Revolution, radio and film censorship, and Communist and Socialist theories of the media. Author information is not given. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780761819165
  • Publisher: University Press of America
  • Publication date: 1/28/2000
  • Pages: 394
  • Product dimensions: 0.81 (w) x 9.00 (h) x 6.00 (d)

Meet the Author

Walter M. Brasch, a national award-winning former newspaper Reporter and Editor, is a University Professor of Journalism and Mass Communications and Syndicated Newspaper Columnist. Dana R. Ulloth is a Professor in the Department of Mass Communication at Bloomsburg University of Pennsylvania.

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Table of Contents

Acknowledgements
Introduction
1 A History of Fear 3
Essay on Freedom 13
Histories 14
2 A Massacre of Mankind 17
3 An Inquisition of Knowledge 23
4 The Star Chamber--and Beyond: From Protection to Persecution 31
5 Preservation Through Suppression 37
6 The Restoration of the Monarchy--And Suppression of the People 43
The Sentencing of John Twyn 46
7 The Early American Colonies: Absence of Toleration 49
8 Philosophy and Free Expression 53
9 The Greater the Oppression, The Greater the Resistance 59
10 From Compliance to Dissent 69
11 The Libertarian Grounds for Revolution 83
12 The Seeds of Revolution 89
13 A Flowering of the Revolution 93
14 Radicals as Statesmen 95
15 A Dark Age 99
Restraint and Misinformation 115
16 No Longer Concerned 119
17 A Manifest Destiny 123
18 'If All Mankind Minus One ...' 125
19 Freedom, Suppression, and Slavery: The Antebellum Era 131
20 Libertarianism, Censorship, and a Nation in Pain 135
21 The Moral Suppressor 139
22 The U. S. Post Office: The Censor's Stamp
23 A Growing Economy; A Growing Suppression 159
24 The First Amendment: Sedition From Peace to War 167
25 Changing Concepts: World War I to World War II 189
26 Book Burning: American Style 209
27 Censoring Celluloid 215
28 Radio: Scarcity Means Suppression 223
29 Struggles for Domination 229
ACLU Annual Report (1943) 236
30 A New Media Control: Making the Journalists Responsible 239
31 Formalizing Responsibility 251
The Press and Public Opinion 259
32 'I Have a List of Communists ...' 265
33 Free Expression and Suppression 279
Some Theoretical Concerns in Defining the Limits
The First Amendment: An Absolute Right 303
Expression and Action: The Dividing Line 312
Bibliography (Chapters 1-33) 317
34 Communist and Socialist Theories of the Media 323
Concepts of the Socialist Press: Selected Writings 343
The Role of Mass Media in a Developed Society 352
35 The New World Information Order 361
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