Social Interest: A Challenge to Mankind

Social Interest: A Challenge to Mankind

by Alfred Adler
     
 
Originally published in German in 1933 as "Der Sinn des Lebens," (The Meaning of Life), the book was translated into English and published in 1938 as "Social Interest: A Challenge to Mankind." In his preface, Adler states, "So far then as man's meaning about himself and about the external world is concerned, this can be best discovered from the significance he finds

Overview

Originally published in German in 1933 as "Der Sinn des Lebens," (The Meaning of Life), the book was translated into English and published in 1938 as "Social Interest: A Challenge to Mankind." In his preface, Adler states, "So far then as man's meaning about himself and about the external world is concerned, this can be best discovered from the significance he finds in life and from the significance he gives to his own life. It is obvious that here possible discord with an ideal social feeling, with social life, cooperation, and the sense of fellowship can be distinctly heard."

Alfred Adler's famous comment, "My psychology belongs to everyone!" emphasized his commitment to uncovering the mystery of human nature for the general public. His supremely clear, yet profound insights about preventing and curing mental illness and crime, as well as a philosophy for leading a happy and fulfilled life, were articulated in a series of four books. Today, Adler's vigorous committment to overcoming the deadly virus of inequality at all levels of life, provides a deeply relevant guide today for achieving truly democratic living in all of our relationships: in our families, in our work, in our communities, and in our nation. Adler's original, popular writings are unequaled sources of inspiration, offering superb introductions to his theory, philosophy, and practice for students, instructors, and clinicians.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
2940014841931
Publisher:
Alfred Adler Institute of Northwestern Washington
Publication date:
08/01/2012
Series:
Adlerian Classics
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
File size:
170 KB

Meet the Author

Alfred Adler was born in Vienna, Austria on February 7, 1870. During the early decades of this century he originated the ideas which, to a large extent, have been incorporated in the mainstream of present-day theory and practice of psychology and psychopathology.

The second of six children, Adler spent his childhood in the suburbs of Vienna. He remembered that when he was about 5 years old, gravely ill with pneumonia, the physician told his father that he doubted the child would recover. It was at that time that Alfred decided he wanted to become a doctor so that he might be able to fight deadly diseases. He never changed his mind, and in 1895 he acquired his M.D. degree at the University of Vienna.

In 1912 Adler published his book, The Neurotic Constitution, in which he further developed his main concepts. He called his psychologic system "Individual Psychology," a term which is sometimes misunderstood. It refers to the indivisibility of the personality in its psychologic structure. His next book, Understanding Human Nature, which comprises lectures given at the Viennese Institute for Adult Education, is still on the required-reading list of some American high schools.

In 1926 Adler was invited to lecture at Columbia University, and from 1932 on he held the first chair of Visiting Professor of Medical Psychology at Long Island College of Medicine. During these and the following years he spent only the summer months, from May to October, in Vienna, and the academic year lecturing in the States. His family joined him there in 1935.

Adler's lectures were overcrowded from the beginning, and he communicated as easily with his audiences in English as he did when using his native German tongue.

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