Social Policy and Social Programs: A Method for the Practical Public Policy Analyst / Edition 6

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Overview

Explores the basics of social policy and program analysis, such as designing new programs or evaluating and improving existing ones.

Social Policy and Social Programs is distinctive in providing specific criteria for judging the effectiveness of social policies and programs. These criteria can be applied to the analysis of widely different social services such as counseling and therapeutic services, supportive assistance, and “hard” benefits like food stamps, cash, and housing vouchers.

By focusing especially on social problems, policies, and programs in major practice areas like child welfare, health, poverty, and mental illness, the author provides students with the tools they need to understand and evaluate the programs in which they are doing their field placements.

Upon completing this book readers will be able to:

  • Analyze the effectiveness of current social programs
  • Create new programs based on the criteria provided
  • Apply what they have learned to evaluate their field placement programs

Note: MySearchLab does not come automatically packaged with this text. To purchase MySearchLab, please visit: www.mysearchlab.com or you can purchase a ValuePack of the text + MySearchLab (at no additional cost): ValuePack ISBN-10: 0205222943 / ValuePack ISBN-13: 9780205222940.

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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

“Excellent...really appreciate the clarity in defining terms and providing examples.”

-Tammie Glenn, University of Michigan-Ann Arbor

Booknews
To help student-practitioners maintain their sanity amid mutating social welfare policies and programs by developing critical analysis skills, Chambers (U. of Kansas) presents the field's historical-judicial contexts; a practical style of analysis; and an example applying basic concepts and evaluation criteria to federal child welfare legislation. An auxiliary website is available. The previous copyright date is 1993. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknew.com)
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780205052769
  • Publisher: Pearson
  • Publication date: 11/22/2012
  • Series: Connecting Core Competencies Series
  • Edition description: New Edition
  • Edition number: 6
  • Pages: 224
  • Sales rank: 888,838
  • Product dimensions: 7.90 (w) x 10.00 (h) x 0.80 (d)

Meet the Author

Donald Chambers received his undergraduate degree in Biology and Psychology from Stanford University in 1950, his Masters degree in Social Work from the University of Nebraska in 1952 and his Doctoral degree from Washington University (St. Louis) in 1967. He practiced as a social worker in Nebraska for nine years and was Director of a regional mental health clinic in Pocatello, Idaho for three years before his appointment to the staff of the Mental Health Institute at Clarinda, Iowa. He retired after 27 years as a Professor in the School of Social Welfare at the University of Kansas where he taught social policy courses and evaluation research for many years. He did research at the British Library in London, England, on policy topics, primarily the British Workman's Compensation system and the British tradition of social policy. In various years he was the recipient of Fulbright Research awards for the study of adoption law and administration in Central American countries. He is the author of a book on Evaluation Research as well as on a method for the analysis of Social Policy and Programs. Over the years he published in leading policy journals in both England and the United States.

Jane Bonk has a Bachelor of Liberal Arts for St. John’s College, a Masters from the School of Social Services Administration, University of Chicago, and earned a Ph.D. from Jane Addams College of Social Work, University of Illinois at Chicago. She has worked as a practitioner and an administrator for over thirty years in both non-profit and for-profit social welfare organizations in child welfare and mental health. She has taught at the Master’s Level in social work. Currently, she is a Commissioner for the Council on Accreditation (COA) where she has been very active in implementing The Hague Treaty for International Adoption.

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Table of Contents

Found in this Section:

1. Brief Table of Contents

2. Full Table of Contents


1. BRIEF TABLE OF CONTENTS

Preface

PART ONE: CREATING THE CONTEXT FOR SOCIAL POLICY ANALYSIS: THE SOCIAL PROBLEM CONTEXT

Chapter 1: Analyzing the Social Problem Background of Social Policies and Social Programs

PART TWO: A STYLE OF POLICY ANALYSIS FOR THE PRACTICAL PUBLIC POLICY ANALYST

Chapter 2: An Overview of a Style of Policy Analysis: A Value-Critical Approach

Chapter 3: The Analysis of Policy Goals and Objectives in Social Programs and Policies

Chapter 4: Who Gets What: The Analysis of Types of Benefits and Services

Chapter 5: Who Gets What, How Much, and Under What Conditions: Analysis of Eligibility Rules

Chapter 6: Analysis of Service-Delivery Systems and Social Policy and Program Design

Chapter 7: How Do We Pay for Social Welfare Policies and Programs? Analysis of Financing

Chapter 8: Analysis of Interactions among Policy Elements

PART THREE: ANALYSIS OF SOCIAL POLICIES AND SOCIAL PROGRAMS USING BASIC CONCEPTS AND EVALUATION CRITERIA: AN EXAMPLE

Chapter 9: An Example of Social Policy and Social Program Analysis: Selected Features of Federal Child Welfare Legislation since 1970 Concerned with Child Abuse

Notes

Photo Credits

Index


2. FULL TABLE OF CONTENTS

Preface

PART ONE: CREATING THE CONTEXT FOR SOCIAL POLICY ANALYSIS: THE SOCIAL PROBLEM CONTEXT

Chapter 1: Analyzing the Social Problem Background of Social Policies and Social Programs

The Nature of Social Problems

Social Problem Analysis

Problem Definition

Causes and Consequences

Ideology and Values

Gainers and Losers

Using the Conclusions of Social Problem Analysis to Design Social Policies and Programs and to Judge Their “Fit” to the Social Problem

Summary

PART TWO: A STYLE OF POLICY ANALYSIS FOR THE PRACTICAL PUBLIC POLICY ANALYST

Chapter 2: An Overview of a Style of Policy Analysis: A Value-Critical Approach

The Policy and Program Analysis Process: An Overview of the Six Fundamental Policy Elements

Criteria for a Value-Critical Appraisal of Social Policy and Programs

Summary

Chapter 3: The Analysis of Policy Goals and Objectives in Social Programs and Policies

Introduction

Definitions and Basic Concepts for Analysis of Goals and Objectives

Different Types of Goals and Objectives

Long-Term/Short-Term Goals and Objectives

Goals Differ from Latent Social Functions

Distinguishing between Goals and Objectives

Objectives (Not Goals) Must Contain Target Group Specifications and Performance Standards

Why Have Both Goals and Objectives?

Setting Goals and Objectives in the Personal Social Services

Social Control and Program and Practice Objectives

Goals and Objectives Vary According to the Developmental Stage of the Program

Methods of Identifying Goals and Objectives

Step 1: Locate the Enabling Legislation

Step 2: Locate Legislative History

Step 3: Locate Staff and Committee Studies and Reports

Step 4: Check Other “Official” Sources

Locating Sources for Goals and Objectives in State-Administered and Private Social Programs

Evaluating Program or Policy System Goals and Objectives: A Value-Critical Approach

Evaluating the Fit between Goals and Objectives and the Social Problem Analysis

Evaluating Goals and Objectives against Traditional Economic Criteria: Adequacy, Equity, and Efficiency

Adequacy

Equity With Respect to Goals and Objectives

Efficiency With Respect to Goals and Objectives

Some Evaluation Criteria Unique to Goals and Objectives

Clarity

Measurability

Manipulability

Concern with Outcomes, Not Services Provided

The Analyst’s Own Value Perspectives in Evaluating the Merit of Goals and Objectives

Summary

Chapter 4: Who Gets What: The Analysis of Types of Benefits and Services

Introduction

A Classification Scheme for Benefit and Service Types

Summary of Types of Benefits and Services

Multiple and Interrelated Benefits

Criteria for Evaluating the Merit of Benefit and Service Types

Stigmatization, Cost-Effectiveness, Substitutability, Target Efficiency, and Trade-Offs

The Political and Public Administration Viewpoint

Criteria for Evaluating the Merit of Benefit Types: Consumer Sovereignty, Coercion, and Intrusiveness

Criteria for Evaluating the Fit of the Benefit/Service Type to the Social Problem Analysis

Criteria for Evaluating the Merit of Benefit Forms: Adequacy, Equity, and Efficiency

Summary

Chapter 5: Who Gets What, How Much, and Under What Conditions: Analysis of Eligibility Rules

Introduction

Types of Eligibility Rules

Eligibility Rules Based on Prior Contributions

Eligibility by Administrative Rule and Regulation

Eligibility by Private Contract

Eligibility by Professional Discretion

Eligibility by Administrative Discretion

Eligibility by Judicial Decision

Eligibility by Means Testing

Establishing Attachment to the Workforce

Eligibility Inclusion and Exclusion

Criteria for Evaluating the Merit of Eligibility Rules

Fit with the Social Problem Analysis

Criteria Specific to Eligibility Rules

Trade-Offs in Evaluating Eligibility Rules

Overwhelming Costs, Overutilization, and Underutilization

Work Disincentives, Incentives, and Eligibility Rules

Procreational Incentives, Marital Instability, and Generational Dependency

Opportunities for Political Interference via Weak Eligibility Rules

Summary

Chapter 6: Analysis of Service-Delivery Systems and Social Policy and Program Design

Introduction

Social Policy and Program Design

Program Theory (The Logic Model)

Program Specification

Some Different Types of Administration and Delivery of Social Service Programs, Benefits, and Services

Centralized Service-Delivery Systems

Client-Centered Management and “Inverted Hierarchy” Service-Delivery Systems

Federated Service-Delivery Organizations

Case-Management Service-Delivery Systems

Staffing with Indigenous Workers as a Service-Delivery Strategy

Referral Agencies in Delivering Social Service

Program Consumer/Beneficiary, Client-Controlled Organizations as a Service-Delivery Strategy

Racial, Ethnic, and Religious Agencies as a Service-Delivery Strategy

Privatization of Service Delivery

Criteria for Evaluating Program Administration and Service Delivery

Introduction

Services and Benefits Should Be Integrated and Continuous

Services and Benefits Should Be Easily Accessible

Organizations Should Be Accountable for Their Actions and Decisions

Citizens and Consumers Should Be Participating in Organizational Decision Making

Organizations and Their Staff Must Be Able to Relate to Racial, Gender, and Ethnic Diversity

Organizations Must Resist the Temptation to Self-Perpetuate

Summary

Chapter 7: How Do We Pay for Social Welfare Policies and Programs? Analysis of Financing

Introduction

Evaluative Criteria Specific to Financing

Chapter 8: Analysis of Interactions among Policy Elements

Introduction

Coentitlement

Disentitlement

Contrary Effects

Duplication

Summary

PART THREE: ANALYSIS OF SOCIAL POLICIES AND SOCIAL PROGRAMS USING BASIC CONCEPTS AND EVALUATION CRITERIA: AN EXAMPLE

Chapter 9: An Example of Social Policy and Social Program Analysis: Selected Features of Federal Child Welfare Legislation since 1970 Concerned with Child Abuse

The Social Problem Context

Definition of the Social Problem

The Ideological Perspective

Causal Analysis

Gainers and Losers

The Judicial Context

The Historical Context

The Social Program and Policy System

Introduction

Goals and Objectives

Eligibility Rules

Form of Benefit and/or Service

Administration and Service Delivery

Financing

Interactions between Basic Policy Elements and between This and Other Programs

Notes

Photo Credits

Index

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