BN.com Gift Guide

Social Problems / Edition 14

Paperback (Print)
Rent
Rent from BN.com
$27.32
(Save 83%)
Est. Return Date: 12/30/2014
Buy Used
Buy Used from BN.com
$98.76
(Save 40%)
Item is in good condition but packaging may have signs of shelf wear/aging or torn packaging.
Condition: Used – Good details
Used and New from Other Sellers
Used and New from Other Sellers
from $55.93
Usually ships in 1-2 business days
(Save 66%)
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (29) from $55.93   
  • New (10) from $131.33   
  • Used (19) from $55.93   

Overview

Social Policy and Social Problems

This authoritative and accessible text provides a contemporary introduction to social problems with a close look at social policies.

Respected scholars William Kornblum and Joseph Julian introduce the major trends and future outlook for each social problem by looking at them from a global perspective and “big picture” view. Social policies devised to address social problems--and their consequences--are examined in depth by presenting the key research conducted to examine, explain and alleviate today's social problems.

Teaching & Learning Experience

  • Personalize Learning – The new MySocLab delivers proven results in helping students succeed, provides engaging experiences that personalize learning, and comes from a trusted partner with educational expertise and a deep commitment to helping students and instructors achieve their goals.
  • Improve Critical Thinking – Learning pedagogy and critical thinking explorations help develop deeper understanding of topics.
  • Engage Students – Controversies and their consequences are explored to place material in context of the world.
  • Support Instructors – The new MySocLab helps instructors extend information out of the classroom.

Note: MySocLab does not come automatically packaged with this text. To purchase MySocLab, please visit: www.mysoclab.com or you can purchase a ValuePack of the text + MySocLab (at no additional cost): ValuePack ISBN-10: 0205222617 / ValuePack ISBN-13: 9780205222612

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

Thank you to the following reviewers:

Dennis Veleber Montana State University Great Falls College of Technology
Deva Chopyak Cosmunes River College
Jennifer Chernega Winona State University
Karen Colvin University of Baltimore
Raab Bonni Dominican College
Booknews
From a sociological perspective, Kornblum (City U. of New York, Graduate School and U. Center) and Julian (San Francisco State) undertake this updated survey of classic and contemporary societal conundrums and possible policy solutions related to: physical health- care (e.g. HIV/AIDS and managed care challenges), mental illness, sexuality, substance abuse, criminality, violence, poverty, prejudice and discrimination, sex role inequality, aging, the changing family, education, workplace issues, urban problems, population and immigration, technology and the environment, and war and terrorism. Annotation c. by Book News, Inc., Portland, Or.
Booknews
A college level textbook on the sociological analysis of social problems and the policies designed to alleviate or eliminate these problems. This tenth edition sees extensive revision including updated sections on the health care crisis, the AIDS epidemic, homophobia, the sex tourism industry, genetic dispositions towards alcoholism, the recent spate of school killings, and new discussions on affirmative action. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780205832323
  • Publisher: Pearson
  • Publication date: 9/7/2011
  • Edition number: 14
  • Pages: 576
  • Sales rank: 258,037
  • Product dimensions: 8.50 (w) x 10.80 (h) x 0.60 (d)

Meet the Author

William Kornblum conducts research on urban, social ecology, and community studies. Among his publications are: At Sea in the City: New York from the Water’s Edge; Blue Collar Community, a study of the steel mill neighborhoods of South Chicago; Growing Up Poor and Uptown Kids, written with Terry Williams, and West 42nd Street, the Bright Lights, which during the 1980s became a guide to understanding the street life of lower Times Square. He has served as a social scientist for the U.S. Department of Interior and worked on the development of national parks and environmental reserves in the nation's metropolitan regions. He is also the author of two popular undergraduate textbooks, Social Problems (Pearson) and Sociology in a Changing World (Wadsworth). Kornblum received his PhD in sociology from the University of Chicago (1971) and his undergraduate degree in biology from Cornell (1961) He taught physics and chemistry as a Peace Corps Volunteer in Ivory Coast (1962-63) and was on the faculty at the University of Washington before he came to the Graduate Center of the City University of New York in 1973.
Read More Show Less

Read an Excerpt

PREFACE:

PREFACE

This tenth edition of Social Problems appears during an almost unprecedented stretch of economic good times for the United States and most urban industrial nations. Despite the relative prosperity, however, prospects for addressing the nation's and the world's social problems are far from rosy. The continuing failure of health-care reform has resulted in increasing numbers of people who lack health insurance. The Welfare Reform Act of 1996 continues to have consequences that are positive in terms of numbers of people working but negative for the children of poor families. Indeed, children have been hit hardest by recent changes in social policy, particularly cuts in child support for low-income families. Elsewhere in the world, there is a widening gap between the haves and the have-nots—a gap that can be seen between entire nations as well as between the rich and the poor within nations—and this poses a major threat to world security. The threat of a renewed arms race, especially between India and Pakistan, and continuing ethnic strife in the nations of the former Soviet empire and throughout much of Africa are testing the capabilities of the United Nations and the world's most powerful nations, especially the United States.

For every major social problem confronting Americans and citizens of other nations, there are groups of people dedicated to seeking a solution. Some of them are experts on particular social problems, like the members of the medical profession who each day confront the tragedy of AIDS, or the law enforcement professionals who cope with crime and violence. Others are nonprofessionals, often citizenswho have decided to devote themselves to doing something about a particular situation or problem. Among these activists are people who have experienced the condition they seek to improve—women who have suffered sexual abuse, people who know what it is to be homeless, drug and alcohol abusers who want to help themselves and others, and neighbors confronted with the dumping of toxic wastes. Such groups may include elected officials and other political leaders who are expected to formulate sound social policies to address social problems. This book is written in an effort to make their work more effective and in the hope that some readers will be moved to take up their causes. We dedicate it to the citizens of the world who devote some of their precious time on earth to helping others.

Organization of the Book

The first few chapters of this book focus on relatively individual behaviors, such as drug use and crime. The social institutions and other factors that affect these behaviors are noted and described: The middle chapters focus on inequality and discrimination, discussing such topics as poverty, prejudice, sexism, and ageism. Every attempt has been made to indicate the effects of large-scale discrimination on individuals, as well as to deal with the concept of institutionalized inequalities. Later chapters discuss problems that are common to many societies, such as those related to family life and work. The final chapters—on the problems of cities, environmental pollution, and war and terrorism—focus on matters of global significance. It seems best to discuss each subject in a separate chapter in order to deal with it comprehensively and in depth. Throughout the book, however, an attempt has been made to indicate how the different problems overlap and are interrelated.

Pedagogical Devices

Social Problems has been designed to be as helpful as possible to both students and teachers. Each problem is discussed in a well-organized and readable manner. As much as possible, unnecessary terminology has been avoided. The treatment of each problem is analytical as well as descriptive, and includes the most up-to-date findings available.

Each chapter begins with an outline and a set of significant facts and ends with a summary that lists the important concepts presented. Important terms within the chapter are boldfaced and listed at the end of the chapter, and their definitions are included in the Glossary at the end of the book. In addition, boxed discussions in each chapter deal with Current Controversies or Unintended Consequences of efforts to alleviate social problems. New to this edition, a Critical Research feature in each chapter adds a dimension of critical thinking based on sociological research that should enliven debates about social problems and citizens' responsibilities in dealing with them.

In keeping with the book's effort to achieve as much sociological objectivity as possible, there is a feature at the end of each chapter called Beyond Left and Right. Its purpose is to help students think critically about the partisan debates over the problems discussed in the chapter they have just read. Each chapter also includes a pedagogical aid titled Social Problems Online, which will help students use the World Wide Web to inquire more deeply into particular social problems. Internet Exercises are provided at the end of each chapter.

Changes in the Tenth Edition

The reception given to previous editions of Social Problems by both colleagues and students has been encouraging, and many of their suggestions and criticisms have been incorporated in subsequent revisions. This edition represents a continuing effort to create a comprehensive, up-to-date text. To this end, the text has been thoroughly revised. Our aim has been to retain the book's emphasis on the sociological analysis of social problems, as well as the policies designed to alleviate or eliminate them. Although policies change continually, we have attempted to update the discussions of policy to reflect the most recent thinking about solutions to social problems.

In the preparation of this edition, certain areas of the text have received special attention. Chapter 2 (Problems of Physical Health) has been extensively revised in light of the rapid rise of managed care, the growing number of uninsured or inadequately insured Americans, and the sharp debate about insurance company influence on medical care. The chapter also has a thoroughly updated section on AIDS as a global plague, as well as more material on patients' rights. Chapter 3 (Mental Illness) has a new section on suicide and more discussion of sensational crimes by the mentally ill. Chapter 4 (Sex-Related Social Problems) has an extended discussion of homophobia and its consequences and a Critical Research feature on sex tourism that is likely to generate much student interest.

Chapter 5 (Alcohol and Other Drugs) reflects renewed debate over the justifications for extremely harsh punishment of drug users, especially marijuana users, and new material on the genetic factors in alcoholism. Chapter 6 (Crime and Criminals) has new material on interventions against violent gangs, research on racial profiling, and a new section on hate crimes. Chapter 7 (Violence) includes new material on school killings. Chapter 8 (Poverty Amid Affluence) has an expanded discussion of the impact of welfare reform, more material about the working poor, and a Critical Research feature on the problems of single mothers, to name only some of the extensive changes made in this key chapter. Chapter 9 (Racism, Prejudice, and Discrimination) has been extensively updated with new material about affirmative action and far more emphasis on racism in contemporary life in the United States and elsewhere. Chapter 10 (Sex Roles and Inequality) has an expanded discussion of child-care issues under workfare and a new section on power and male hegemony.

Later chapters reflect important changes in social problems, both global and domestic: an expanded discussion of the implications of aging populations worldwide in Chapter 11 (An Aging Society); a new Critical Research feature on fatherless families and more about worldwide divorce patterns in Chapter 12 (The Changing Family); and a Critical Research feature on the digital divide and its impact on education and inequality in Chapter 13 (Problems of Education). Chapter 14 (Problems of Work and the Economy) has been completely revamped, with new sections on corporate power and wealth in a globalizing economy, plus far more material about the effects of globalization on women in the labor force, job stress, and job insecurity, as well as more on the impacts of new technologies. Chapter 15 (Urban Problems) has more material about ethnic enclaves in major cities, with some emphasis on the Miami Cubans. Chapter 16 (Population and Immigration) has a new section on worldwide hunger and a Critical Research feature on starvation in the midst of plenty. There are extensive reports on new environmental problems in Chapter 17 (Technology and the Environment). Chapter 18 (War and Terrorism) has updated material on globalization and worldwide patterns of terrorism and the growing threat of rogue states.

Throughout the text, statistical material, figures, and tables have been updated wherever necessary, and recent research has been cited throughout. The Social Policy sections incorporate recent programs and proposals.

Supplements

Instructors and students who use this textbook have access to a number of materials designed to complement the classroom lectures and activities and to enhance the students' learning experience:

For the Instructor

Instructor's Resource Manual. This essential instructor's tool includes chapter outlines, teaching objectives, discussion questions, classroom activities, and film/video suggestions.

Test Item File. This carefully prepared manual consists of over 1,300 multiple-choice and essay questions. All multiple-choice questions are page referenced to the text. Prentice Hall Custom Test is a test generator designed to allow the creation of personalized exams. It is available in Windows and Macintosh formats.

Prentice Hall Color Transparencies: Social Problems, Series III. Full color illustrations, charts, and other visual materials have been selected to offer an effective means of amplifying lecture topics.

ABC News/Prentice Hall Video Library for Social Problems. Selected video segments from award-winning ABC News programs such as Nightline, ABC World Nexus Tonight/American Agenda, and 20/20 accompany topics featured in the text. Please contact your local Prentice Hall sales representative for more details.

For the Student

Student Study Guide. This carefully written guide helps students better understand the material presented in the text. Each chapter consists of chapter summaries, learning objectives, detailed chapter outlines, key terms, and self-test questions page referenced to the text.

The New York Times Supplement. The New York Times and Prentice Hall are sponsoring Themes of the Times, a program designed to enhance student access to current information of relevance in the classroom. Through this program, the core subject matter provided in the text is supplemented by a collection of time-sensitive articles from one of the world's most distinguished newspapers, The New York Times. These articles demonstrate the vital, ongoing connection between what is learned in the classroom and what is happening in the world around us.

To enjoy the wealth of information of The New York Times daily, a reduced subscription rate is available. For information call toll-free: 1-800-631-1222.

Prentice Hall and The New York Times are proud to cosponsor Themes of the Times. We hope it will make the reading of both textbooks and newspapers a more dynamic, involving process.

Media Supplements

Sociology on the Internet: Evaluating Online Resources. This guide focuses on developing the critical thinking skills necessary to evaluate and use online sources effectively. The guide provides a brief introduction to navigating the Internet, along with complete references related specifically to the Sociology discipline and how to use the companion websites available for many Prentice Hall textbooks. This brief supplementary book is free to students when shrinkwrapped as a package with Social Problems, Tenth Edition.

Companion Website™ In tandem with the text, students can now take full advantage of the World Wide Web to enrich their studies through the Social Problems website: ...

Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

IN THIS SECTION:

1.) BRIEF
2.) COMPREHENSIVE



BRIEF TABLE OF CONTENTS:

Chapter 1: Sociological Perspective on Social Problems
Chapter 2: Problems of Health and Healthcare
Chapter 3: Problems of Mental Illness and Treatment
Chapter 4: Alcohol and Other Drugs
Chapter 5: Crime and Violence
Chapter 6: Poverty and Affluence
Chapter 7: Racism, Prejudice, and Discrimination
Chapter 8: Gender and Sexuality
Chapter 9: An Aging Society
Chapter 10: The Changing Family
Chapter 11: Problems of Education
Chapter 12: Problems of Work and the Economy
Chapter 13: Population and Immigration
Chapter 14: Technology and the Environment
Chapter 15: War and Global Insecurity


COMPREHENSIVE TABLE OF CONTENTS:

Chapter 1: Sociological Perspective on Social Problems
What Is a Social Problem?
Perspectives on Social Problems
The Natural History of Social Problems
The Media and Social Problems
Research on Social Problems
Social Policy
Going Beyond Left and Right

Chapter 2: Problems of Health and Healthcare
Healthcare as a Global Social Problem
The Scope of Healthcare Problems in America
AIDS–A Modern Plague
Explanations of Healthcare Problems
Social Policy
Going Beyond Left and Right

Chapter 3: Problems of Mental Illness and Treatment
Mental Illness as a Social Problem
The Social Construction of Mental Illness
Inequality, Conflict, and Mental Illness
Institutional Problems of Treatment and Care
Social Policy
Going Beyond Left and Right

Chapter 4: Alcohol and Other Drugs
The Nature of the Problem
Alcohol Use and Abuse
Illegal Drug Use and Abuse
Social Policy
Going Beyond Left and Right

Chapter 5: Crime and Violence
The Nature of Crime
Types of Crimes and Criminals
Gangs, Guns, and Violent Death
Conditions and Causes of Crime and Violence
Controlling Crime
Social Policy
Going Beyond Left and Right

Chapter 6: Poverty and Affluence
The Haves and the Have-Nots
Poverty and Social Class
The Nature of Poverty
Concomitants of Poverty
Explanations of Persistent Poverty
Social Policy
Going Beyond Left and Right

Chapter 7: Racism, Prejudice, and Discrimination
The Continuing Struggle for Minority Civil Rights
The Social Construction of Minorities
Defining Racism, Prejudice, and Discrimination
Origins of Prejudice and Discrimination
Institutional Discrimination
Some Consequences of Prejudice and Discrimination
Social Policy
Going Beyond Left and Right

Chapter 8: Gender and Sexuality
Traditional Sex Roles
Gender Identity and Sexual Orientation
Sexism and Gender Inequality
Sources of Sexism
Sources of Homophobia
Social Policy
Going Beyond Left and Right

Chapter 9: An Aging Society
Aging as a Social Problem
The Elderly in America Today
Dimensions of the Aging Process
Concomitants of Aging
Retirement
Death
Social Policy
Going Beyond Left and Right

Chapter 10: The Changing Family
The Nature of Families
Divorce
Postponement of Marriage
Changing Norms of Parenthood
Homeless Families
Family Violence
Social Policy
Going Beyond Left and Right

Chapter 11: Problems of Education
Sociological Perspectives on Education
Educational Attainment and Achievement
Education and Equality: The Issue of Equal Access
School Reform: Problems of Institutional Change
Social Policy
Going Beyond Left and Right

Chapter 12: Problems of Work and the Economy
The American Free-Enterprise System: Key Trends
Global Markets and Corporate Power
Effects on American Workers
Problem Aspects of Work
Consumers and Credit
Social Policy
Going Beyond Left and Right

Chapter 13: Population and Immigration
The World's Population
Population Control
The U.S. Population
Immigration and Its Consequences
Social Policy
Going Beyond Left and Right

Chapter 14: Technology and the Environment
The Nature of Technology
Controlling Technology
Technology and Institutions
Technology and the Natural Environment
Environmental Stress
The United States and the World Environment
Social Policy
Going Beyond Left and Right

Chapter 15: War and Global Insecurity
Terrorism, Global and Domestic
War and Its Effects
Controlling Warfare
Theories about War and Its Origins
Social Policy
Going Beyond Left and Right

Glossary
Bibliography
Photo Credits
Index

Read More Show Less

Preface

This tenth edition of Social Problems appears during an almost unprecedented stretch of economic good times for the United States and most urban industrial nations. Despite the relative prosperity, however, prospects for addressing the nation's and the world's social problems are far from rosy. The continuing failure of health-care reform has resulted in increasing numbers of people who lack health insurance. The Welfare Reform Act of 1996 continues to have consequences that are positive in terms of numbers of people working but negative for the children of poor families. Indeed, children have been hit hardest by recent changes in social policy, particularly cuts in child support for low-income families. Elsewhere in the world, there is a widening gap between the haves and the have-nots—a gap that can be seen between entire nations as well as between the rich and the poor within nations—and this poses a major threat to world security. The threat of a renewed arms race, especially between India and Pakistan, and continuing ethnic strife in the nations of the former Soviet empire and throughout much of Africa are testing the capabilities of the United Nations and the world's most powerful nations, especially the United States.

For every major social problem confronting Americans and citizens of other nations, there are groups of people dedicated to seeking a solution. Some of them are experts on particular social problems, like the members of the medical profession who each day confront the tragedy of AIDS, or the law enforcement professionals who cope with crime and violence. Others are nonprofessionals, often citizens who have decided to devotethemselves to doing something about a particular situation or problem. Among these activists are people who have experienced the condition they seek to improve—women who have suffered sexual abuse, people who know what it is to be homeless, drug and alcohol abusers who want to help themselves and others, and neighbors confronted with the dumping of toxic wastes. Such groups may include elected officials and other political leaders who are expected to formulate sound social policies to address social problems. This book is written in an effort to make their work more effective and in the hope that some readers will be moved to take up their causes. We dedicate it to the citizens of the world who devote some of their precious time on earth to helping others.

Organization of the Book

The first few chapters of this book focus on relatively individual behaviors, such as drug use and crime. The social institutions and other factors that affect these behaviors are noted and described: The middle chapters focus on inequality and discrimination, discussing such topics as poverty, prejudice, sexism, and ageism. Every attempt has been made to indicate the effects of large-scale discrimination on individuals, as well as to deal with the concept of institutionalized inequalities. Later chapters discuss problems that are common to many societies, such as those related to family life and work. The final chapters—on the problems of cities, environmental pollution, and war and terrorism—focus on matters of global significance. It seems best to discuss each subject in a separate chapter in order to deal with it comprehensively and in depth. Throughout the book, however, an attempt has been made to indicate how the different problems overlap and are interrelated.

Pedagogical Devices

Social Problems has been designed to be as helpful as possible to both students and teachers. Each problem is discussed in a well-organized and readable manner. As much as possible, unnecessary terminology has been avoided. The treatment of each problem is analytical as well as descriptive, and includes the most up-to-date findings available.

Each chapter begins with an outline and a set of significant facts and ends with a summary that lists the important concepts presented. Important terms within the chapter are boldfaced and listed at the end of the chapter, and their definitions are included in the Glossary at the end of the book. In addition, boxed discussions in each chapter deal with Current Controversies or Unintended Consequences of efforts to alleviate social problems. New to this edition, a Critical Research feature in each chapter adds a dimension of critical thinking based on sociological research that should enliven debates about social problems and citizens' responsibilities in dealing with them.

In keeping with the book's effort to achieve as much sociological objectivity as possible, there is a feature at the end of each chapter called Beyond Left and Right. Its purpose is to help students think critically about the partisan debates over the problems discussed in the chapter they have just read. Each chapter also includes a pedagogical aid titled Social Problems Online, which will help students use the World Wide Web to inquire more deeply into particular social problems. Internet Exercises are provided at the end of each chapter.

Changes in the Tenth Edition

The reception given to previous editions of Social Problems by both colleagues and students has been encouraging, and many of their suggestions and criticisms have been incorporated in subsequent revisions. This edition represents a continuing effort to create a comprehensive, up-to-date text. To this end, the text has been thoroughly revised. Our aim has been to retain the book's emphasis on the sociological analysis of social problems, as well as the policies designed to alleviate or eliminate them. Although policies change continually, we have attempted to update the discussions of policy to reflect the most recent thinking about solutions to social problems.

In the preparation of this edition, certain areas of the text have received special attention. Chapter 2 (Problems of Physical Health) has been extensively revised in light of the rapid rise of managed care, the growing number of uninsured or inadequately insured Americans, and the sharp debate about insurance company influence on medical care. The chapter also has a thoroughly updated section on AIDS as a global plague, as well as more material on patients' rights. Chapter 3 (Mental Illness) has a new section on suicide and more discussion of sensational crimes by the mentally ill. Chapter 4 (Sex-Related Social Problems) has an extended discussion of homophobia and its consequences and a Critical Research feature on sex tourism that is likely to generate much student interest.

Chapter 5 (Alcohol and Other Drugs) reflects renewed debate over the justifications for extremely harsh punishment of drug users, especially marijuana users, and new material on the genetic factors in alcoholism. Chapter 6 (Crime and Criminals) has new material on interventions against violent gangs, research on racial profiling, and a new section on hate crimes. Chapter 7 (Violence) includes new material on school killings. Chapter 8 (Poverty Amid Affluence) has an expanded discussion of the impact of welfare reform, more material about the working poor, and a Critical Research feature on the problems of single mothers, to name only some of the extensive changes made in this key chapter. Chapter 9 (Racism, Prejudice, and Discrimination) has been extensively updated with new material about affirmative action and far more emphasis on racism in contemporary life in the United States and elsewhere. Chapter 10 (Sex Roles and Inequality) has an expanded discussion of child-care issues under workfare and a new section on power and male hegemony.

Later chapters reflect important changes in social problems, both global and domestic: an expanded discussion of the implications of aging populations worldwide in Chapter 11 (An Aging Society); a new Critical Research feature on fatherless families and more about worldwide divorce patterns in Chapter 12 (The Changing Family); and a Critical Research feature on the digital divide and its impact on education and inequality in Chapter 13 (Problems of Education). Chapter 14 (Problems of Work and the Economy) has been completely revamped, with new sections on corporate power and wealth in a globalizing economy, plus far more material about the effects of globalization on women in the labor force, job stress, and job insecurity, as well as more on the impacts of new technologies. Chapter 15 (Urban Problems) has more material about ethnic enclaves in major cities, with some emphasis on the Miami Cubans. Chapter 16 (Population and Immigration) has a new section on worldwide hunger and a Critical Research feature on starvation in the midst of plenty. There are extensive reports on new environmental problems in Chapter 17 (Technology and the Environment). Chapter 18 (War and Terrorism) has updated material on globalization and worldwide patterns of terrorism and the growing threat of rogue states.

Throughout the text, statistical material, figures, and tables have been updated wherever necessary, and recent research has been cited throughout. The Social Policy sections incorporate recent programs and proposals.

Supplements

Instructors and students who use this textbook have access to a number of materials designed to complement the classroom lectures and activities and to enhance the students' learning experience:

For the Instructor

Instructor's Resource Manual. This essential instructor's tool includes chapter outlines, teaching objectives, discussion questions, classroom activities, and film/video suggestions.

Test Item File. This carefully prepared manual consists of over 1,300 multiple-choice and essay questions. All multiple-choice questions are page referenced to the text. Prentice Hall Custom Test is a test generator designed to allow the creation of personalized exams. It is available in Windows and Macintosh formats.

Prentice Hall Color Transparencies: Social Problems, Series III. Full color illustrations, charts, and other visual materials have been selected to offer an effective means of amplifying lecture topics.

ABC News/Prentice Hall Video Library for Social Problems. Selected video segments from award-winning ABC News programs such as Nightline, ABC World Nexus Tonight/American Agenda, and 20/20 accompany topics featured in the text. Please contact your local Prentice Hall sales representative for more details.

For the Student

Student Study Guide. This carefully written guide helps students better understand the material presented in the text. Each chapter consists of chapter summaries, learning objectives, detailed chapter outlines, key terms, and self-test questions page referenced to the text.

The New York Times Supplement. The New York Times and Prentice Hall are sponsoring Themes of the Times, a program designed to enhance student access to current information of relevance in the classroom. Through this program, the core subject matter provided in the text is supplemented by a collection of time-sensitive articles from one of the world's most distinguished newspapers, The New York Times. These articles demonstrate the vital, ongoing connection between what is learned in the classroom and what is happening in the world around us.

To enjoy the wealth of information of The New York Times daily, a reduced subscription rate is available. For information call toll-free: 1-800-631-1222.

Prentice Hall and The New York Times are proud to cosponsor Themes of the Times. We hope it will make the reading of both textbooks and newspapers a more dynamic, involving process.

Media Supplements

Sociology on the Internet: Evaluating Online Resources. This guide focuses on developing the critical thinking skills necessary to evaluate and use online sources effectively. The guide provides a brief introduction to navigating the Internet, along with complete references related specifically to the Sociology discipline and how to use the companion websites available for many Prentice Hall textbooks. This brief supplementary book is free to students when shrinkwrapped as a package with Social Problems, Tenth Edition.

Companion Website In tandem with the text, students can now take full advantage of the World Wide Web to enrich their studies through the Social Problems website. This study resource will correlate the text with related material available on the Internet. Features of the website include chapter objectives, study questions, as well as links to interesting material and information from other sites on the web that reinforce and enhance the content of each chapter.

Distance Learning Solutions. Prentice Hall is committed to making our outstanding text content available to the growing number of courses being delivered over the Internet. By developing relationships with the leading venders—Blackboard , Web CT, and ecollege.com—we provide premium, book-specific content in the delivery method of your choice. Please contact your local Prentice Hall representative to find out more about our products in this area, or visit our online demo site at our site.

Acknowledgments

Revising and updating a social problems textbook is a formidable task. Social problems is a far-ranging field with myriad findings and concepts that accumulate rapidly and are often changing. This edition has benefited from the reviews of many sociologists, all of whom have contributed useful comments and suggestions. We are happy to number among them the following: Barbara K. Chesney, University of Toledo; James E. Floyd, Macon College; Marie Pease Lewis, Macon College; Edward Ponczek, William Rainey Harper College; Steven C. Seyer, Lehigh Carbon Community College; and John Tenuto, DePaul University.

To the following, whose suggestions have enriched all nine previous editions, a special thank-you: Mark Abrahamson, University of Connecticut; Lynn Anderson, Navarro College; Howard Bahr, Brigham Young University; Jeanne Ballantine, Wright State University; Nancy Bartkowski, Northern Michigan University; William Bielby, University of California-Santa Barbara; Susan L. Blackwell, Delgado Community College; Edwin Boling, Wittenberg University; Bradley Jay Buchner, Cheyney University of Pennsylvania; Walter F. Carroll, Bridgewater State College; Carol E. Chandler, McHenry County College, Verghese J. Chirayath, John Carroll University; William T. Clute, University of Nebraska-Omaha; William Cockerham, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign; William L. Collins, Asheville-Buncombe Technical Community College; Paul L. Crook, San Diego Mesa College; William M. Cross, Illinois College; Phillip W. Davis, Georgia State University; Lois Easterday, Onondaga Community College; John Farley, Southern Illinois University; Michael P. Farrell, State University of New York-Buffalo; William Feigelman, Nassau Community College; Morris A. Forslund, University of Wyoming; Sidney Forsythe, Wheaton College; John Galliher, University of Missouri; Harry Gold, Oakland University; Erich Goode, State University of New York-Stony Brook; Norman Goodman, State University of New York-Stony Brook; Marshall Graney, Wayne State University; James Greenley, University of Wisconsin; Julia Hall, Drexel University; John Hedderson, University of Texas-El Paso; John Hendricks, University of Kentucky; Mary R. Holley, Montclair State College; Nils Hovik, Lehigh County Community College; Gary Jensen, University of Arizona; Richard I. Jolliff, El Camino College; Russell I. Johnson, Washington University; Daniel J. Menow, North Dakota State University; Louis Kriesberg, Syracuse University; Patricia Lengermann, George Washington University; and Betty Levine, Indiana University.

Also, Peter Maida, University of Maryland; Wilfred Marston, University of Michigan-Flint; Edward J. McCabe, Eastern Michigan University; Richard L. Meile, Indiana University, Northwest; Steven Messner, State University of New York, Albany; Robert G. Miller, Baker University; Linda Mooney, East Caroline University; George C. Myers, Duke University; Charles Nam, Florida State University; Steven Nock, University of Virginia; Donald Noel, University of Wisconsin; Donald Olmsted, Michigan State University; Barry Perlman, Community College of Philadelphia; Robert Perucci, Purdue University; Karen Predow, formerly of Rutgers University; Robert Rothman, University of Delaware; Nora Roy, Tennessee University; Laura Sanchez, Tulane University; Earl R. Schaeffer, Columbus State Community College; David Schulz, University of Delaware; Mary Sellers, Northampton County Area Community College; John W. Shepard, Jr., Baylor University; Edward G. Stockwell, Bowling Green State University; Russell Stone, State University of New York-Buffalo; Ann Sundgren, Tacoma Community College; Kenrick S. Thompson, Arkansas State University, Mountain Home; Kevin Thompson, North Dakota State University; Miriam G. Vosburgh, Villanova University; William Waegel, Villanova University; Ruth Wallace, George Washington University; and Irving Zola, Brandeis University.

Finally, thanks are due to the many skilled publishing specialists who contributed their talents to this edition. Much of the research on which the revision is based was provided by Joseph Compton. Administrative aspects of the project were skillfully handled by Publisher Nancy Roberts and Managing Editor Sharon Chambliss. Ximena Tamvakopoulos created a pleasing interior design. Serena Hoffman, the project manager, did an enormous amount of work to get the book out on time. Kathy Ringrose took charge of rounding up the photographs that complement the text, and Mary Ann Gloriande was responsible for the manufacturing process. The book owes much to the efforts, creativity, and perseverance of each of them.

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)