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Overview

The author wrote this new edition of the most popular elementary social studies methods text on the market with the following three goals in mind: to present the most powerful social studies content and pedagogy for children in elementary school, to offer the material in simple and accessible ways, and to write in a first person active voice. The purpose of this book is to introduce new teachers to the world of social studies teaching and learning in elementary and middle schools. Geography, history, government and the other social sciences are delivered into the palm of the new teacher’s hand along with a suite of tools for bringing social studies to life in the classroom.

The book is organized into three sections—the first orients the reader to the mission of social studies education to the increasingly diverse children we teach, the second concentrates on the curriculum, and the third deals with instruction, how we plan and teach this curriculum. Three central themes continue to pervade the book—democratic citizenship, diversity, and the social sciences—to ultimately encourage teachers to excite their students about closing the gap between social realities and democratic ideals. An exceptionally strong chapter on multicultural issues (Chapter 2) helps future teachers truly understand the changing demographics of the American classroom.

Abridged NCSS standards and their classroom applications are found at www.myeducationlab.com.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780137034253
  • Publisher: Pearson
  • Publication date: 4/7/2011
  • Edition description: New Edition
  • Edition number: 14
  • Pages: 504
  • Sales rank: 91,460
  • Product dimensions: 7.90 (w) x 9.90 (h) x 0.80 (d)

Meet the Author

I teach in the College of Education at the University of Washington in Seattle where I chair the Social Studies Education Program. I study K—12 social studies education and, in particular, the civic development of youth. I’m especially interested in the ways civic education, multicultural education, and global education overlap. My other books are Renewing the Social Studies Curriculum (1991); Educating the Democratic Mind (1996); Education for Democracy: Contexts, Curricula, and Assessments (2002); Teaching Democracy: Unity and Diversity in Public Life (2003); and Social Studies Today: Research & Practice (2010). I am the editor of the ‘Research and Practice’ column for Social Education, the flagship journal of the National Council for the Social Studies.

I was born and raised in Englewood, Colorado, on Denver’s south side, and taught school for ten years in Adams County on Denver’s north side. I earned the B.A. in Political Science (University of Colorado, Boulder), the M.A. in Social Foundations of Education (University of Colorado, Denver), and the Ph.D. in Curriculum and Instruction (University of Washington, Seattle). I live in Seattle with the rain and my wife, Sheila Valencia.

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Read an Excerpt

PREFACE:

PREFACE

The purpose of this book continues as it has always been: to introduce new teachers to the world of social studies teaching and learning in elementary and middle schools, and to help them unleash their intelligence and creativity on this vitally important subject area. The social studies curriculum is a great collection of tools, ideas, and stories—a veritable garden of delights—without which children would be ill-equipped for both private life and public life in a fast-changing world.

The rationale of this book continues as well: Without historical understanding, there can be no wisdom; without geographical understanding, no social or environmental intelligence; without economic understanding, no sane use of resources and, therefore, no future; and without civic understanding, no democratic citizens and, therefore, no democracy. This is why social studies matters. When children are empowered by knowledgeable and skillful teachers with the ideas, skills, values, questions, and attitudes that compose the social studies curriculum, their judgment is improved. Consequently, they can reason historically, help solve community problems, appreciate diversity, protect the environment, and, with deep understanding, empathize with the hopes, dreams, and struggles of people everywhere.

Instructors and readers of the prior edition urged me to retain the same organization of the book, which they found so straightforward and uncomplicated. There are three parts: the first orients readers to the mission of social studies education and to the diverse children we teach; the second concentrates on thecurriculum—what we try to teach; the third on instruction—how we try to teach it. There are thirteen chapters overall, one more than the prior edition to allow for a new chapter (9) that focuses squarely on resources for teaching and learning social studies.

Instructors and readers also have appreciated the "Sampler" which accompanies the text as an ancillary. It contains core excerpts from Curriculum Standards for Social Studies: Expectations of Excellence, which is the acclaimed set of standards and instructional vignettes from the good people at the National Council for the Social Studies. The members of the committee who wrote these standards and vignettes are listed at the front of the Sampler. I know how hard these people worked, and I thank them for this unique and practical resource.

The central emphasis on citizenship education in a diverse society continues as well. The children in today's classrooms are even more culturally and racially diverse than in the past, which translates into new challenges for teachers. Teachers cannot continue to attend only to yesterday's familiar and comfortable categories of differences among children: development and ability. Educationally sound and loving responses are needed as well to ethnic, linguistic, gender, religious, and racial differences. Chapter 2 focuses squarely on diversity in the classroom, and this theme pervades the book. Children's story books, for example, are appreciated not only for the historical narratives they can convey, but also because different stories about the same event can help children understand that multiple perspectives are part-and-parcel of historical study. They are the norm, not the exception.

Citizenship education has a chapter of its own as well. At the same time that diversity is increasing in our society (literally increasing: there are more languages in the classroom each year, more religions, more cultures) and the quest to educate all our children intensifies as well, we teachers must also step up our efforts to nurture the common ground and the common good—the democratic ideals and institutions that stretch across our differences and bind us together in a civic community. Diversity is no threat to this civic unity. "We the people" created the government of the United States in part to protect this diversity. Educating children in such a way that they will not only exercise their freedom and celebrate their differences but take on the responsibilities of citizenship is the great mission of social studies education. There is much that teachers of even the youngest children can do, as readers will see in the pages that follow.

New to This Edition

As there is continuity, so is there change. Much is new and renewed in this eleventh edition. It is more practical than ever, with more ready-to-use applications. You will find in chapter 3 a new idea-filled section on teaching about voting and elections, and in chapter 4 a new section on teaching historical reasoning to children—teaching them to "think like historians" rather than only absorbing history (though that is important, too). The chapter on lesson and unit planning (7) now comes before the chapter on teaching strategies. The teaching strategies chapter (8) concentrates on just three "classic" strategies for teaching social studies material at any grade level: concept formation, inquiry, and a time-honored procedure for teaching social studies skills. These are instructional methods or scaffolds that no beginning teacher would want to be without, and they are beloved by legions of award-winning social studies teachers. Of course, many additional strategies are detailed elsewhere in the text.

There are other changes as well. The following list gives the highlights:

  • Lesson Plans: New model Lesson Plans are included that work well for beginning teachers. Now 19 model lesson plans pervade the text, including the four in the final chapter that make up the integrated unit called Explore. Each Lesson Plan features important social studies content, a sensible procedure, assessment, and ideas for curriculum integration. Additional lesson plans are available on the text's Companion Website.
  • Assessment: There are scoring rubrics and portfolios for historical reasoning, map work, civic discussion, and literature, and chapter 10 lays the foundation.
  • Resources: A separate resource chapter (9) has been added. From guest speakers to field trips, from the school multimedia center to the Internet, from textbooks to children's literature—knowledge of resources can make the difference to a new teacher.
  • Technology: Technology/Internet applications run (should I say "speed"?) through the book. Ten "virtual field trips" are included for the first time in the new Resources chapter. Included in each chapter are a number of URLs to help readers expand their study of the content. These websites are conveniently linked to the text's Companion Website.
  • Integration: The final chapter, Social Studies as the Integrating Core, has been revised to clarify the two most common and essential approaches to integrating social studies with other school subjects: infusion and fusion.
  • Considerate Text: Each chapter opens with a "Chapter Snapshot" that captures the chapter contents in action, plus Main Idea, Key Concepts, and Chapter Outline. Also, there is a helpful introduction and conclusion to each chapter.
  • Cooperative Learning and Current Events. These two topics continue as major chapters, but they have been pruned and sharpened so that they are directly relevant to new teachers of social studies.

Acknowledgments

I am grateful first and foremost to Professor John Jarolimek, for the invitation to assume responsibility for this book. John authored the first edition of this book in 1959. He was then on the faculty at San Diego State College (now San Diego State University); I was ten years old and a fifth-grader in Englewood, Colorado. John joined the faculty of the College of Education at the University of Washington in Seattle in 1962;1 did likewise in 1985. With the 1993 revision of this text (the 9th edition), John invited me to join him as co-author with the understanding that I would gradually move into the driver's seat. With the present edition, the eleventh, John bids you farewell. He and I remain dear friends, and he is surely the book's closest reader. Perhaps no one has as many admiring friends in the worldwide social studies community as John Jarolimek.

I am indebted to a number of individuals who assisted in procuring photographs, artwork, and other materials. Sincere thanks go to Sharon Pray Muir, Oakland University; Michael Simpson, National Council for the Social Studies; Tom Condon, McGraw-Hill School Division; Kristin Palmquist, California Department of Education; Joseph A. Braun, Jr., Illinois State University; and my able assistant, Julie Rieg.

I want to express my gratitude and appreciation as well to a number of persons who gave generously of their time, whether reading drafts, offering suggestions, or otherwise challenging my thinking. These include Sheila Valencia, James A. Banks, Theodore Kaltsounis, Sam Wineburg, Geneva Gay, Allen Glenn, David Harris, Pam Grossman, Barbara McKean, Bob Howard, Akira Ninomiya, John Cogan, Roland Case, Ken Osborne, Carole Hahn, Somwung Pitiyanuwat, Diana Hess, Mary McFarland, Gloria Ladson-Billings, Barry Beyer, Jean Craven, Gloria Contreras, Valerie Ooka Pang, Bill Stanley, Paula Fraser, Doug Selwyn, Brad Coulter, Tarry Lindquist, Paulette Thompson, Bruce Larson, Terry Beck, Patricia Espiritu, Jonathan Miller-Lane, Carole Hahn, Nathaniel Jackson, Pat Avery, Pam and Gene Edgar, and Joe and Kathy Jenkins.

Heartfelt thanks also go to the reviewers who evaluated the previous edition of this book and offered such helpful suggestions for the current edition: Robert Agostino, Duquesne University; Sally R. Beisser, Drake University; Kent Freeland, Morehead State University; Nancy P. Gallavan, University of Nevada, Las Vegas; Felipe V Golez, California State University, Long Beach; Bruce E. Larson, Western Washington University; Barbara McKean, University of Arizona; Jay A. Monson, Utah State University; Tony Sanchez, Purdue University; and Wilson J. Warren, Indiana State University.

I was most fortunate, as well, to have the caring attention, commitment, and patience of my editors at Merrill; Brad Potthoff, Mary Irvin, and Hope Madden, and copyeditor Cindy Peck.

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Table of Contents

PART I: Introduction to Social Studies Education

Chapter 1: Social Studies Education: What and Why

Chapter 2: Teaching Diverse Children

PART II: The Social Studies Curriculum

Chapter 3: Democratic Citizenship Education

Chapter 4: History, Geography, and the Social Sciences

Chapter 5: Powerful Tools: Maps, Globes, Charts, and Graphics

Chapter 6: Current Events and Public Issues

PART III: Planning and Teaching Social Studies

Chapter 7: Assessing Student Learning

Chapter 8: Planning Units, Lessons, and Activities

Chapter 9: Five Great Teaching Strategies

Chapter 10: The Literacy—Social Studies Connection

Chapter 11: Social Studies as the Integrating Core

Chapter 12: Four Great Resources

Notes

Index

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Preface

PREFACE

The purpose of this book continues as it has always been: to introduce new teachers to the world of social studies teaching and learning in elementary and middle schools, and to help them unleash their intelligence and creativity on this vitally important subject area. The social studies curriculum is a great collection of tools, ideas, and stories—a veritable garden of delights—without which children would be ill-equipped for both private life and public life in a fast-changing world.

The rationale of this book continues as well: Without historical understanding, there can be no wisdom; without geographical understanding, no social or environmental intelligence; without economic understanding, no sane use of resources and, therefore, no future; and without civic understanding, no democratic citizens and, therefore, no democracy. This is why social studies matters. When children are empowered by knowledgeable and skillful teachers with the ideas, skills, values, questions, and attitudes that compose the social studies curriculum, their judgment is improved. Consequently, they can reason historically, help solve community problems, appreciate diversity, protect the environment, and, with deep understanding, empathize with the hopes, dreams, and struggles of people everywhere.

Instructors and readers of the prior edition urged me to retain the same organization of the book, which they found so straightforward and uncomplicated. There are three parts: the first orients readers to the mission of social studies education and to the diverse children we teach; the second concentrates on thecurriculum—what we try to teach; the third on instruction—how we try to teach it. There are thirteen chapters overall, one more than the prior edition to allow for a new chapter (9) that focuses squarely on resources for teaching and learning social studies.

Instructors and readers also have appreciated the "Sampler" which accompanies the text as an ancillary. It contains core excerpts from Curriculum Standards for Social Studies: Expectations of Excellence, which is the acclaimed set of standards and instructional vignettes from the good people at the National Council for the Social Studies. The members of the committee who wrote these standards and vignettes are listed at the front of the Sampler. I know how hard these people worked, and I thank them for this unique and practical resource.

The central emphasis on citizenship education in a diverse society continues as well. The children in today's classrooms are even more culturally and racially diverse than in the past, which translates into new challenges for teachers. Teachers cannot continue to attend only to yesterday's familiar and comfortable categories of differences among children: development and ability. Educationally sound and loving responses are needed as well to ethnic, linguistic, gender, religious, and racial differences. Chapter 2 focuses squarely on diversity in the classroom, and this theme pervades the book. Children's story books, for example, are appreciated not only for the historical narratives they can convey, but also because different stories about the same event can help children understand that multiple perspectives are part-and-parcel of historical study. They are the norm, not the exception.

Citizenship education has a chapter of its own as well. At the same time that diversity is increasing in our society (literally increasing: there are more languages in the classroom each year, more religions, more cultures) and the quest to educate all our children intensifies as well, we teachers must also step up our efforts to nurture the common ground and the common good—the democratic ideals and institutions that stretch across our differences and bind us together in a civic community. Diversity is no threat to this civic unity. "We the people" created the government of the United States in part to protect this diversity. Educating children in such a way that they will not only exercise their freedom and celebrate their differences but take on the responsibilities of citizenship is the great mission of social studies education. There is much that teachers of even the youngest children can do, as readers will see in the pages that follow.

New to This Edition

As there is continuity, so is there change. Much is new and renewed in this eleventh edition. It is more practical than ever, with more ready-to-use applications. You will find in chapter 3 a new idea-filled section on teaching about voting and elections, and in chapter 4 a new section on teaching historical reasoning to children—teaching them to "think like historians" rather than only absorbing history (though that is important, too). The chapter on lesson and unit planning (7) now comes before the chapter on teaching strategies. The teaching strategies chapter (8) concentrates on just three "classic" strategies for teaching social studies material at any grade level: concept formation, inquiry, and a time-honored procedure for teaching social studies skills. These are instructional methods or scaffolds that no beginning teacher would want to be without, and they are beloved by legions of award-winning social studies teachers. Of course, many additional strategies are detailed elsewhere in the text.

There are other changes as well. The following list gives the highlights:

  • Lesson Plans: New model Lesson Plans are included that work well for beginning teachers. Now 19 model lesson plans pervade the text, including the four in the final chapter that make up the integrated unit called Explore. Each Lesson Plan features important social studies content, a sensible procedure, assessment, and ideas for curriculum integration. Additional lesson plans are available on the text's Companion Website.
  • Assessment: There are scoring rubrics and portfolios for historical reasoning, map work, civic discussion, and literature, and chapter 10 lays the foundation.
  • Resources: A separate resource chapter (9) has been added. From guest speakers to field trips, from the school multimedia center to the Internet, from textbooks to children's literature—knowledge of resources can make the difference to a new teacher.
  • Technology: Technology/Internet applications run (should I say "speed"?) through the book. Ten "virtual field trips" are included for the first time in the new Resources chapter. Included in each chapter are a number of URLs to help readers expand their study of the content. These websites are conveniently linked to the text's Companion Website.
  • Integration: The final chapter, Social Studies as the Integrating Core, has been revised to clarify the two most common and essential approaches to integrating social studies with other school subjects: infusion and fusion.
  • Considerate Text: Each chapter opens with a "Chapter Snapshot" that captures the chapter contents in action, plus Main Idea, Key Concepts, and Chapter Outline. Also, there is a helpful introduction and conclusion to each chapter.
  • Cooperative Learning and Current Events. These two topics continue as major chapters, but they have been pruned and sharpened so that they are directly relevant to new teachers of social studies.

Acknowledgments

I am grateful first and foremost to Professor John Jarolimek, for the invitation to assume responsibility for this book. John authored the first edition of this book in 1959. He was then on the faculty at San Diego State College (now San Diego State University); I was ten years old and a fifth-grader in Englewood, Colorado. John joined the faculty of the College of Education at the University of Washington in Seattle in 1962;1 did likewise in 1985. With the 1993 revision of this text (the 9th edition), John invited me to join him as co-author with the understanding that I would gradually move into the driver's seat. With the present edition, the eleventh, John bids you farewell. He and I remain dear friends, and he is surely the book's closest reader. Perhaps no one has as many admiring friends in the worldwide social studies community as John Jarolimek.

I am indebted to a number of individuals who assisted in procuring photographs, artwork, and other materials. Sincere thanks go to Sharon Pray Muir, Oakland University; Michael Simpson, National Council for the Social Studies; Tom Condon, McGraw-Hill School Division; Kristin Palmquist, California Department of Education; Joseph A. Braun, Jr., Illinois State University; and my able assistant, Julie Rieg.

I want to express my gratitude and appreciation as well to a number of persons who gave generously of their time, whether reading drafts, offering suggestions, or otherwise challenging my thinking. These include Sheila Valencia, James A. Banks, Theodore Kaltsounis, Sam Wineburg, Geneva Gay, Allen Glenn, David Harris, Pam Grossman, Barbara McKean, Bob Howard, Akira Ninomiya, John Cogan, Roland Case, Ken Osborne, Carole Hahn, Somwung Pitiyanuwat, Diana Hess, Mary McFarland, Gloria Ladson-Billings, Barry Beyer, Jean Craven, Gloria Contreras, Valerie Ooka Pang, Bill Stanley, Paula Fraser, Doug Selwyn, Brad Coulter, Tarry Lindquist, Paulette Thompson, Bruce Larson, Terry Beck, Patricia Espiritu, Jonathan Miller-Lane, Carole Hahn, Nathaniel Jackson, Pat Avery, Pam and Gene Edgar, and Joe and Kathy Jenkins.

Heartfelt thanks also go to the reviewers who evaluated the previous edition of this book and offered such helpful suggestions for the current edition: Robert Agostino, Duquesne University; Sally R. Beisser, Drake University; Kent Freeland, Morehead State University; Nancy P. Gallavan, University of Nevada, Las Vegas; Felipe V Golez, California State University, Long Beach; Bruce E. Larson, Western Washington University; Barbara McKean, University of Arizona; Jay A. Monson, Utah State University; Tony Sanchez, Purdue University; and Wilson J. Warren, Indiana State University.

I was most fortunate, as well, to have the caring attention, commitment, and patience of my editors at Merrill; Brad Potthoff, Mary Irvin, and Hope Madden, and copyeditor Cindy Peck.

Read More Show Less

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