Social Things: An Introduction to the Sociological Life / Edition 3

Paperback (Print)
Buy New
Buy New from BN.com
$23.16
Buy Used
Buy Used from BN.com
$17.36
(Save 40%)
Item is in good condition but packaging may have signs of shelf wear/aging or torn packaging.
Condition: Used – Good details
Used and New from Other Sellers
Used and New from Other Sellers
from $1.99
Usually ships in 1-2 business days
(Save 93%)
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (15) from $1.99   
  • New (3) from $5.25   
  • Used (12) from $1.99   

Overview

In the new fourth edition of Social Things, Charles Lemert continues to build on the remarkable narrative that first appeared in 1997. The author brings new material into almost every chapter-a stunning account of Hurricane Katrina to illustrate sociological incompetence, new material on maquiladora workers and low-wage immigrant farm workers, an expanded presentation of Pierre Bourdieu's thinking, discussions of America's exploitation of the natural resources of less-developed nations, as well as updated information and facts throughout the book.

About the Author:
Charles Lemert is the Andrus Professor of Sociology at Wesleyan University in Connecticut and is the author of many widely read books, including, most recently, Thinking the Unthinkable; Deadly Worlds: The Emotional Costs of Globalization; Dark Thoughts: Race and the Eclipse of Society; and Postmodernism Is Not What You Think: How Globalization Threatens Modernity

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Booknews
The first edition appeared in 1977. The book is primarily for use in introductory sociology classes. Part story and history, it shows how we would not encounter "individuals who trust or threaten us were it not for social forces beyond our reach...." What this means is that Lemert (sociology, Wesleyan) is interested in how individuals' lives are shaped not only by intention and local conditions, but also by global forces, especially political and economic events and trends. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)
Joe Feagin
Charles Lemert makes sociology vital and alive in this provocative yet friendly introduction. Lemert uses personal biography and the life stories of sociologists, including female, gay and lesbian, and black social thinkers too often overlooked. He asks tough questions of race, class, and gender that most other introductions bypass.
Rhonda F. Levine
With its significantly updated chapter on the state of the discipline since the 1960s, Lemert's Social Things continues to be the best book about the discipline and practice of sociology since C. Wright Mills's The Sociological Imagination.
Rebecca Overmyer-Velázquez
Social Things is indispensable for teaching sociology well, with all of its nuances and mind-bending complexities. Lemert meets students where they are and then demonstrates to them how deeply relevant is the discipline for any thoughtful understanding of their social worlds. This has certainly been true of the first four editions and, with the welcome addition of a new chapter on 'global things on a fragile planet' in the fifth edition, it will remain required reading for all of my students.
Sociological Analysis
Social Things is a triumph. In a time when sociologists must convince others that sociology is not the study of the obvious, Lemert shows that it is highly relevant, both in the classroom and especially in living a fulfilled social life. It is a text that will get new students excited about sociology, and it will remind the professional sociologist of sociology's responsibility and possibility.
— Christopher Bartley
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780742535480
  • Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, Inc.
  • Publication date: 7/14/2005
  • Edition description: Third Edition
  • Edition number: 3
  • Pages: 248
  • Product dimensions: 5.54 (w) x 8.49 (h) x 0.55 (d)

Meet the Author

Charles Lemert is Andrus Professor of Sociology at Wesleyan University in Connecticut, and is the author of many widely read books, including, most recently, Survivor Stories with Anthony Elliott; Dark Thoughts: Race and the Eclipse of Society; and Postmodernism Is Not What You Think: How Globalization Threatens Modernity.

Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

Part 1 The Sociological Life Chapter 2 Chapter 1: Imagining Social Things, Competently Chapter 3 Chapter 2: Personal Courage and Practical Sociologies Chapter 4 Chapter 3: Practicing the Discipline of Social Things Part 5 Sociology Chapter 6 Chapter 4: Sociology and the Lost Worlds of the New World Order: 1848-1920 Chapter 7 Chapter 5: Sociology Becomes the Science of Worldly Structures: 1920-1960 Chapter 8 Chapter 6: Sociology Discovers Its Complicated Vocation: After 1960 Part 9 Social Things Chapter 10 Chapter 7: The Mysterious Power of Social Structures Chapter 11 Chapter 8: The Lively Subjects of Dead Structures Chapter 12 Chapter 9: Well-Measured Lives in a World of Differences Part 13 Global Things Chapter 14 Chapter 10: Global Methods Chapter 15 Chapter 11: Global Things Queer the Social Chapter 16 Chapter 12: Living against the Conclusion

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)