Socialism and modern science. (Darwin, Spencer, Marx) [NOOK Book]

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V. SOCIALISM AND RELIGIOUS BELIEFS. Not one of the three contradictions between socialism and Darwinism, which Haeckel formulated, and which so many others have echoed since, resists a candid and more accurate examination of the ...
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Socialism and modern science. (Darwin, Spencer, Marx)

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Overview

Purchase of this book includes free trial access to www.million-books.com where you can read more than a million books for free.
This is an OCR edition with typos.
Excerpt from book:
V. SOCIALISM AND RELIGIOUS BELIEFS. Not one of the three contradictions between socialism and Darwinism, which Haeckel formulated, and which so many others have echoed since, resists a candid and more accurate examination of the natural laws which bear the name of Charles Darwin. I add that not only is Darwinism not in contradiction with socialism, but that it constitutes one of its fundamental scientific premises. As Virchow justly remarked, socialism is nothing but a logical and vital corollary, in part of Darwinism, in part of Spencerian evolution. The theory of Darwin, whether we wish it or not, by demonstrating that man is descended from the animals, has dealt a severe blow to the belief in God as the creator of the universe and of man by a special fiat. This, moreover, is why the most bitter opposition, and the only opposition which still continues, to its scientific inductions, was made and is made in the name of religion. It is true that Darwin did not declare himself an atheist1 and that Spencer is not one; it is also true that, 1 Darwin never made a declaration of atheism, but that -was in fact his way of looking at the problem ("sa manure de voir."). While Haeckel, concerned solely with triumphing over the opposition, said at the Congress of Eisenach (1882) thatstrictly speaking, the theory of Darwin, like that of Spencer, can also be reconciled with the belief in God, since it may be admitted that God created matter and force, and that both afterward evolved into their successive forms in accordance with the initial creative impulse. Nevertheless, it cannot be denied that these theories, by rendering the idea of causality more and more inflexible and universal, lead necessarily to the negation of God, since there always remains this question: And G...
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Product Details

  • BN ID: 2940024603314
  • Publisher: New York International library publishing co.
  • Format: eBook
  • Edition description: Digitized from 1900 volume
  • File size: 324 KB

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V. SOCIALISM AND RELIGIOUS BELIEFS. Not one of the three contradictions between socialism and Darwinism, which Haeckel formulated, and which so many others have echoed since, resists a candid and more accurate examination of the natural laws which bear the name of Charles Darwin. I add that not only is Darwinism not in contradiction with socialism, but that it constitutes one of its fundamental scientific premises. As Virchow justly remarked, socialism is nothing but a logical and vital corollary, in part of Darwinism, in part of Spencerian evolution. The theory of Darwin, whether we wish it or not, by demonstrating that man is descended from the animals, has dealt a severe blow to the belief in God as the creator of the universe and of man by a special fiat. This, moreover, is why the most bitter opposition, and the only opposition which still continues, to its scientific inductions, was made and is made in the name of religion. It is true that Darwin did not declare himself an atheist1 and that Spencer is not one; it is also true that, 1 Darwin never made a declaration of atheism, but that -was in fact his way of looking at the problem ("sa manure de voir."). While Haeckel, concerned solely with triumphing over the opposition, said at the Congress of Eisenach (1882) thatstrictly speaking, the theory of Darwin, like that of Spencer, can also be reconciled with the belief in God, since it may be admitted that God created matter and force, and that both afterward evolved into their successive forms in accordance with the initial creative impulse. Nevertheless, it cannot be denied that these theories, by rendering the idea of causality more and more inflexible and universal, leadnecessarily to the negation of God, since there always remains this question: And G...
Read More Show Less

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