Socializing Capital: The Rise of the Large Industrial Corporation in America

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Overview

"The first thoroughly sociological inquiry into the rise of corporate capitalism I know of, and the most trenchant critique of the prevailing 'efficiency theorists' we are likely to have for some time. The book abounds with stunning insights into the rocky and highly contingent history of the industrial corporation, closely argued and very well documented. These are laurels Roy can rest on for a long time after this immense and exciting effort."—Charles Perrow, Yale University

"Genuinely interesting, well-written, clear, forceful. I was most impressed with the wealth of material that the author presented. Socializing Capital is a story that deserves to be told, and it will receive a lot of attention."—Mark S. Mizruchi, University of Michigan

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Editorial Reviews

Contemporary Sociology
Socializing Capital is a shining example of the 'new economic sociology.' Roy's question is bold because it challenges the economic orthodoxy that the modern corporation arose because of its efficiency. His answer is creative because it weaves together insights from power and institutional perspectives to revise the history of the modern corporation.
— Frank Dobbin
American Journal of Sociology
William G. Roy's ambitious book about the ascendancy of the large industrial corporation in the United States sheds new light on a complex and timely subject.... Socializing Capital is a significant scholarly work, rich in detail, that makes important contributions to the historical study of corporate power.
— Scott R. Bowman
Choice
Richly detailed, this book builds on the significant work of historians, economists, and social scientists who have dominated the field of business history for a generation or more. It is a major contribution. . . .
Contemporary Sociology - Frank Dobbin
Socializing Capital is a shining example of the 'new economic sociology.' Roy's question is bold because it challenges the economic orthodoxy that the modern corporation arose because of its efficiency. His answer is creative because it weaves together insights from power and institutional perspectives to revise the history of the modern corporation.
American Journal of Sociology - Scott R. Bowman
William G. Roy's ambitious book about the ascendancy of the large industrial corporation in the United States sheds new light on a complex and timely subject.... Socializing Capital is a significant scholarly work, rich in detail, that makes important contributions to the historical study of corporate power.
From the Publisher
One of Choice's Outstanding Academic Titles for 1997

"Socializing Capital is a shining example of the 'new economic sociology.' Roy's question is bold because it challenges the economic orthodoxy that the modern corporation arose because of its efficiency. His answer is creative because it weaves together insights from power and institutional perspectives to revise the history of the modern corporation."—Frank Dobbin, Contemporary Sociology

"William G. Roy's ambitious book about the ascendancy of the large industrial corporation in the United States sheds new light on a complex and timely subject.... Socializing Capital is a significant scholarly work, rich in detail, that makes important contributions to the historical study of corporate power."—Scott R. Bowman, American Journal of Sociology

"Richly detailed, this book builds on the significant work of historians, economists, and social scientists who have dominated the field of business history for a generation or more. It is a major contribution. . . . "—Choice

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780691010342
  • Publisher: Princeton University Press
  • Publication date: 7/1/1999
  • Pages: 360
  • Product dimensions: 6.10 (w) x 9.20 (h) x 0.90 (d)

Table of Contents

List of Figures
List of Tables
Preface
Ch. 1 Introduction 3
Ch. 2 A Quantitative Test of Efficiency Theory 21
Ch. 3 The Corporation as Public and Private Enterprise 41
Ch. 4 Railroads: The Corporation's Institutional Wellspring 78
Ch. 5 Auxiliary Institutions: The Stock Market, Investment Banking, and Brokers 115
Ch. 6 Statutory Corporate Law, 1880-1913 144
Ch. 7 Prelude to a Revolution 176
Ch. 8 American Industry Incorporates 221
Ch. 9 Conclusion: A Political Sociology of the Large Corporation 259
Notes 287
References 301
Index 319
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