Sociological Theory in the Classical Era: Text and Readings / Edition 2

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Overview

Trained at UCLA and at NYU respectively, Laura Desfor Edles and Scott Appelrouth were frustrated by their inability to find a sociological theory text that could inspire enthusiasm in undergraduate students while providing them with analytical tools for understanding theory and exposing them to original writings from pivotal theorists. They developed this widely used text/reader to fill that need.

This affordable text/reader hybrid introduces students to original major writings from sociology's key classical theorists as well as from a variety of other voices, and also provides a helpful theoretical and historical framework, written by the editors, with which to understand those often intimidating readings. In addition to presenting a unique format, this book is one of the only theory texts to feature photos and diagrams, making it even more student friendly.

New and Retained Features

  • The book’s praised text/reader format provides students with the interpretive and analytical guidance necessary to interpret the included original readings.
  • The book is updated throughout, with new readings added to the Weber, Marx, and Durkheim chapters.
  • A theoretical framework presented in Chapter 1 gives students a visual means to understand the theorists and perspectives that follow.
  • Theoretical Orientation Diagrams and Core Concepts Diagrams, now even more visually appealing, show students how to fit the theorist under study into the broader universe of social theory.
  • “Significant Others” boxes, including 5 new ones, provide information on theorists who may have followed and derived much of their own perspective from the major theorists featured in each chapter.
  • The ends of chapters include even more discussion questions in this edition.
  • Unlike other texts, each chapter includes photos of theorists and of the historical milieu from which the theories arose, along with applications to contemporary scenes. In particular, the Du Bois chapter includes a new photo of President Obama.

Ancillaries

  • Password-protected instructor resources, new to this edition, are available at www.pineforge.com/edles2einstr and include test questions and Power Point slides for each chapter.

Intended Audience

This text is intended for Classical Sociological Theory or Sociological Theory courses in sociology departments at both the undergraduate and graduate levels.

Praise for the First Edition

“Sociological Theory in the Classical Era is an ambitious and successful attempt to revitalize the teaching of sociological theory….” —Jeffrey Alexander, Yale University

“.… This book will likely be template that future texts in theory will try to emulate.” —Edward Lehman, New York University

"I chose this text because it is largely dedicated to original texts and it offers relevant yet short introductions…. I also particularly like that the intros to individual texts offer context but do not directly summarize or analyze the excerpts.” —Jacques Henry, University of Louisiana at Lafayette

Contributor to the SAGE Teaching Innovations and Professional Development Award

Find out more at www.sagepub.com/sociologyaward

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Editorial Reviews

Jacques Henry
"I chose this text because it is largely dedicated to original texts and it offers relevant yet short introductions…. I also particularly like that the intros to individual texts offer context but do not directly summarize or analyze the excerpts. "
Edward Lehman
“Edles and Appelrouth's new book is a major contribution for those striving to help students understand the essential place of theory in the sociological enterprise. It skillfully demonstrates the contemporary relevance of classical theory, elucidates the complex interplay of empirical research and sociological theory, and makes crystal clear that good theory must always be more than idle speculation. The authors are to be commended for how they interweave biographical sketches, background influences, core ideas, and theoretical orientations, on the one hand, with their inclusion of pivotal primary sources. This book will likely be template that future texts in theory will try to emulate.”
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781412975643
  • Publisher: SAGE Publications
  • Publication date: 10/5/2009
  • Edition description: Second Edition
  • Edition number: 2
  • Pages: 428
  • Sales rank: 156,179
  • Product dimensions: 6.90 (w) x 9.90 (h) x 0.90 (d)

Meet the Author

Laura Desfor Edles (Ph.D., UCLA, 1990) is Professor of Sociology at California State University, Northridge. She is the author of Symbol and Ritual in the New Spain (Cambridge University Press, 1998), Cultural Sociology in Practice (Blackwell Publishers, 2002), and various articles on social theory and culture.

Scott Appelrouth (Ph.D., New York University, 2000) is Professor of Sociology at California State University, Northridge. His interests include social theory, cultural sociology, and social movements. He teaches classical and contemporary theory at both the graduate and undergraduate levels and has published various articles in research and teaching journals.

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Table of Contents

List of Illustrations and Photos
List of Figures and Tables
About the Authors
Preface
1. Introduction
What Is Sociological Theory?
Why Read Original Works?
Who Are Sociology's Core Theorists?
How Can We Navigate Sociological Theory?
DISCUSSION QUESTIONS
2. Karl Marx
A Biographical Sketch
Intellectual Influences and Core Ideas
Significant Others—Thorstein Veblen (1857-1929): The Leisure Class and Conspicuous Consumption
Marx's Theoretical Orientation
Significant Others—Antonio Gramsci (1891-1937): Hegemony and the Ruling Ideas
READINGS
Introduction to The German Ideology
From The German Ideology (1845-1846)
Introduction to Economic and Philosophic Manuscripts of 1844
From Economic and Philosophic Manuscripts of 1844
Introduction to The Communist Manifesto
From The Communist Manifesto (1848)
Introduction to Capital
From Capital (1867)
Introduction to Friedrich Engels's The Origin of the Family, Private Property and the State
From The Origin of the Family, Private Property and the State (1884)
DISCUSSION QUESTIONS
3. Émile Durkheim
A Biographical Sketch
Intellectual Influences and Core Ideas
Significant Others—Auguste Comte (1798-1857): The Father of "Social Physics "
Significant Others—Herbert Spencer (1820-1903): Survival of the Fittest
Durkheim's Theoretical Orientation
READINGS
Introduction to The Division of Labor in Society
From The Division of Labor in Society (1893)
Introduction to The Rules of Sociological Method
From The Rules of Sociological Method (1895)
Introduction to Suicide: A Study in Sociology
From Suicide: A Study in Sociology (1897)
Introduction to The Elementary Forms of Religious Life
From The Elementary Forms of Religious Life (1912)
DISCUSSION QUESTIONS
4. Max Weber
A Biographical Sketch
Intellectual Influences and Core Ideas
Significant Others—Friedrich Nietzsche (1844-1900): Is God Dead?
Significant Others—Robert Michels (1876-1936): The Iron Law of Oligarchy
Weber's Theoretical Orientation
READINGS
Introduction to The Protestant Ethic and the Spirit of Capitalism
From The Protestant Ethic and the Spirit of Capitalism (1904)
Introduction to "The Social Psychology of the World Religions "
From "The Social Psychology of the World Religions" (1915)
Introduction to "The Distribution of Power Within the Political Community: Class, Status, Party "
"The Distribution of Power Within the Political Community: Class, Status, Party" (1925)
Introduction to "The Types of Legitimate Domination "
From "The Types of Legitimate Domination" (1925)
Introduction to "Bureaucracy "
From "Bureaucracy" (1925)
DISCUSSION QUESTIONS
5. Charlotte Perkins Gilman
A Biographical Sketch
Significant Others—Harriet Martineau (1802-76): The First Woman Sociologist
Intellectual Influences and Core Ideas
Gilman's Theoretical Orientation
READINGS
Introduction to "The Yellow Wallpaper "
"The Yellow Wallpaper" (1892)
"Why I Wrote 'The Yellow Wallpaper' "
Introduction to Women and Economics
From Women and Economics (1898)
DISCUSSION QUESTIONS
6. Georg Simmel
A Biographical Sketch
Intellectual Influences and Core Ideas
Significant Others—Ferdinand Tönnies (1855-1936): Gemeinschaft and Gesellschaft
Simmel's Theoretical Orientation
READINGS
Introduction to "Exchange "
From "Exchange," From The Philosophy of Money (1907)
Introduction to "Conflict "
From "Conflict," From Sociology (1908)
Introduction to "Sociability "
From "Sociability" (1910)
Introduction to "The Stranger "
From "The Stranger," From Sociology (1908)
Introduction to "Fashion "
From "Fashion" (1904)
Introduction to "The Metropolis and Mental Life "
From "The Metropolis and Mental Life" (1903)
DISCUSSION QUESTIONS
7. W. E. B. Du Bois
Significant Others—Anna Julia Cooper (1858-1964): A Voice From the South
A Biographical Sketch
Intellectual Influences and Core Ideas
Du Bois's Theoretical Orientation
READINGS
Introduction to The Philadelphia Negro
From The Philadelphia Negro (1899)
Introduction to The Souls of Black Folk
From The Souls of Black Folk (1903)
Introduction to "The Souls of White Folk "
From "The Souls of White Folk," From Darkwater (1920)
DISCUSSION QUESTIONS
8. George Herbert Mead
A Biographical Sketch
Intellectual Influences and Core Ideas
Significant Others—Charles Horton Cooley (1864-1929): The "Looking-Glass Self "
Significant Others—William James (1842-1910): Consciousness and the Self
Mead's Theoretical Orientation
READINGS
Introduction to "Mind "
From "Mind," From Mind, Self, and Society (1934)
Introduction to "Self "
From "Self," From Mind, Self, and Society (1934)
Introduction to "Society "
From "Society," From Mind, Self, and Society (1934)
DISCUSSION QUESTIONS
References
Photo Credits
Index

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