Sociology of Religion: A Reader / Edition 2

Paperback (Print)
Rent
Rent from BN.com
$17.59
(Save 82%)
Est. Return Date: 09/28/2014
Used and New from Other Sellers
Used and New from Other Sellers
from $21.00
Usually ships in 1-2 business days
(Save 78%)
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (16) from $21.00   
  • New (7) from $88.35   
  • Used (9) from $21.00   
Close
Sort by
Page 1 of 2
Showing 1 – 10 of 16 (2 pages)
Note: Marketplace items are not eligible for any BN.com coupons and promotions
$21.00
Seller since 2009

Feedback rating:

(1792)

Condition:

New — never opened or used in original packaging.

Like New — packaging may have been opened. A "Like New" item is suitable to give as a gift.

Very Good — may have minor signs of wear on packaging but item works perfectly and has no damage.

Good — item is in good condition but packaging may have signs of shelf wear/aging or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Acceptable — item is in working order but may show signs of wear such as scratches or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Used — An item that has been opened and may show signs of wear. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Refurbished — A used item that has been renewed or updated and verified to be in proper working condition. Not necessarily completed by the original manufacturer.

Acceptable
2010 Paperback Fair CONTAINS SLIGHT WATER DAMAGE / STAIN, STILL VERY READABLE, SAVE$$! ! This item may not include any CDs, Infotracs, Access cards or other supplementary ... material. Read more Show Less

Ships from: Lincoln, NE

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
$49.28
Seller since 2008

Feedback rating:

(149)

Condition: Good
Some notes/underlining to text, reading wear to cover and edges.

Ships from: Napa, CA

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express (AK, HI)
$58.22
Seller since 2014

Feedback rating:

(836)

Condition: Good
May have minimal notes/highlighting, minimal wear/tear. Please contact us if you have any Questions.

Ships from: Downingtown, PA

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
$60.99
Seller since 2008

Feedback rating:

(3022)

Condition: Good
All orders ship SAME or NEXT business day. Expedited shipments will be received in 1-5 business days within the United States. We proudly ship to APO/FPO addresses. 100% ... Satisfaction Guaranteed! Read more Show Less

Ships from: Grandview Heights, OH

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
$83.70
Seller since 2014

Feedback rating:

(181)

Condition: Acceptable
Paperback 2nd Edition text. MILD HIGHLIGHTING. WEAR ON COVER.. Ships fast. Ships fast. Expedited shipping 2-4 business days; Standard shipping 7-14 business days. Ships from USA!

Ships from: Pittsburg, KS

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
$83.70
Seller since 2014

Feedback rating:

(181)

Condition: Good
Paperback 2nd Edition text. CLEAN INSIDE!!!. Ships fast. Ships fast. Expedited shipping 2-4 business days; Standard shipping 7-14 business days. Ships from USA!

Ships from: Pittsburg, KS

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
$88.35
Seller since 2011

Feedback rating:

(312)

Condition: New
. Speedy service! Choose EXPEDITED for fastest shipping!

Ships from: Edmond, OK

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
$91.59
Seller since 2007

Feedback rating:

(23309)

Condition: New
BRAND NEW

Ships from: Avenel, NJ

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
$109.86
Seller since 2009

Feedback rating:

(10080)

Condition: New
New Book. Shipped from US within 4 to 14 business days. Established seller since 2000

Ships from: Secaucus, NJ

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
$109.95
Seller since 2014

Feedback rating:

(6)

Condition: Acceptable
Upper Saddle River 2010 Paperback 2nd Revised edition. Revised. Fair. 400 p. Black & white tables. Intended for college/higher education audience.

Ships from: Pueblo West, CO

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
Page 1 of 2
Showing 1 – 10 of 16 (2 pages)
Close
Sort by

Overview

For undergraduate/graduate courses in the Sociology of Religion in departments of Sociology; and for courses such as Religious Perspectives on Social Issues in departments of Theology.

A reader that seeks to explore the relationship between the structure and culture of religion and various elements of social life in the U.S.

Sociology of Religion: A Reader, 2e is ideal as either a standalone reader or supplement to the text written by the same author team, Why Religion Matters. Based on both classic and contemporary research in the sociology of religion, this reader highlights a variety of research methods and theoretical approaches. It explores the ways in which religious values, beliefs and practices shape the world outside of church, synagogue, or mosque walls while simultaneously being shaped by the non-religious forces operating in that world.

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780205710829
  • Publisher: Pearson
  • Publication date: 10/4/2010
  • Edition description: New Edition
  • Edition number: 2
  • Pages: 400
  • Sales rank: 447,732
  • Product dimensions: 7.00 (w) x 9.10 (h) x 1.00 (d)

Meet the Author

Susanne C. Monahan is Associate Professor and former chair of the Department of Sociology and Anthropology at Montana State University. She received a Ph.D. and A.M. in Sociology from Stanford University, and a B.A. in Sociology/Anthropology and Economics from Swarthmore College. Her research focuses on complex organizations, including work on American congregations and clergy. She is co-editor, along with William Mirola and Michael Emerson, of Sociology of Religion: A Reader, and has published articles and reviews in the Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion, Review of Religious Research, Sociology of Religion, Theoretical Criminology, Justice Quarterly, Journal of the American Academy of Religion and Child Development.

William A. Mirola is Professor of Sociology and former chair of the Department of History and Social Science at Marian College in Indianapolis, IN. His teaching and research interests focus on the sociology of religion, social class, and social movements and change. In 2009, he co-edited (with Sean McCloud), Religion and Class in America: Culture, History, and Politics. He is co-editor (with Susanne Monahan and Michael Emerson) of Sociology of Religion: A Reader. He has published articles in Sociology of Religion, Social Problems, and Social Science History, principally addressing the intersections of religion and social class as well as religious dynamics in the American labor movement, past and present.

Michael O. Emerson is the Allyn and Gladys Cline Professor of Sociology and Co-Director of the Institute for Urban Research at Rice University. In addition to many articles on the topic of religion, he is the author of several books, including Divided by Faith: Evangelical Religion and the Problem of Race in America (Oxford University Press) and People of the Dream: Multiracial Congregations in the United States (Princeton University Press).

Read More Show Less

Read an Excerpt

Preface

Although we teach in very different settings—a mid-sized state university, a private Catholic college, and a private university—each of us looks forward to our opportunities to teach Sociology of Religion to undergraduate students. There is something about the study of the social aspects of religion that makes for a good class, a class that teaches itself. Students who take a Sociology of Religion class seem especially motivated to struggle with the material, and they typically have a wide range of personal experiences to draw upon as they apply abstract principles to instances of religion in their own lives.

The study of religion in modern society is an exciting enterprise. No matter what you are interested in—the structure and experiences of particular religious groups, the overall state of religion in society, religious belief, ritual and experience, the relation between religion and other social institutions—there is a plethora of resources including books, journals, and research monographs you can draw on. Unfortunately, however, securing copyright permissions for "course packets" has become increasingly complex and difficult. We hope that by constructing a reader that covers a broad range of topics we can meet our own needs as well as those of other instructors who teach in this area.

The focus of this reader is on the structure and culture of religion in the United States. Thus, many of the readings are about religion in the Christian tradition. Nonetheless, where it was feasible, we included readings about religion outside the American context (e.g., Poland, England, El Salvador, Nicaragua), and beyond the Christian tradition (e.g.,Judaism, alternative religions, Hindu traditions). This reader is not intended to be a survey of religion, but rather an introduction to the social aspects of religion, particularly within the United States.

The readings are arranged by topic, and each topic has a brief introductory essay that outlines some key issues and orients students to the readings. Some of the essays focus on defining concepts related to the readings; others provide an overall framework students can use to understand how the readings fit together and what they contribute to our knowledge about the topic. We also include readings from popular sources—newspapers, magazines, and the like—to help students connect more abstract material with things that they see in their day-to-day lives. For instructors, we provide a cross-reference table that provides suggestions for other topics for which an article might be appropriate.

Following a brief introduction by Wade Clark Roof about what is most interesting and exciting in religion today, we present classical sociological definitions of religion by theorists including Emil Durkheim, Clifford Geertz, Karl Marx, and Peter Berger. In teaching the Sociology of Religion, we have been amazed at how much discussion these classical statements generate among students. We continue with sections that focus on the "stuff" of religion—belief, ritual, and religious experience. We then present several sections on how religion is related to various aspects of identity: race and ethnicity, gender, social class, and sexual identity. We put this material early in the volume because religious participation has a powerful ability to shape how we see ourselves-and how we interact with others.

Next, we move to structural concerns. We introduce students to the secularization debate that has raged recently in the sociology of religion: Is religion declining or is it thriving? We follow with sections on organizational aspects of official religion—authority, organizations, and institutions—and on alternative religions. Because religion does not exist in a vacuum, we also include sections examining the relationship between religion and different social institutions: media, politics, and science. We end with a section on the role of religion in social movements and social change.

Although this book covers a lot of topics, we certainly do not expect any one course to include all of the sections or readings. In other courses that we teach, we generally consider a reader to be useful if it can serve as the primary text for a course and if we can use at least one-half to two-thirds of the readings. Additionally, we have tried to organize sections according to common understandings of topics in Sociology of Religion, so that it can be used with a standard textbook or an existing syllabus of topics.

Our discussions about this book began when we were all participants in the Pew Charitable Trusts's Young Scholars of American Religion seminar series between 1997 and 1999. This seminar series was ably run by the Center for the Study of Religion and American Culture at Indiana University-Purdue University in Indianapolis. Conrad Cherry, Terry Grimm, and Bob Carpenter all had a hand in developing and implementing an intellectual endeavor that created lasting bonds—both professional and personal—among the participants.

By design, the Young Scholars seminars focused equally on the research and teaching endeavors of junior-level scholars of American religion. It was during our discussions of teaching that the idea of pulling together a reader for Sociology of Religion first emerged. Our colleagues in this seminar series contributed original essays to this volume, and we thank each of them: Lori Beamon, Patricia Chang, Eric Gormly, William MacDonald, Richard Wood, and Wendy Young. We also owe many thanks to Wade Clark Roof for providing expert, hands-off leadership in the seminar and an introduction to this volume. Conrad Kanagy, also a Young Scholar participant, was extremely helpful as we thought about whether to do this book and how to go about finding a publisher. His other responsibilities made it impossible for him to make a written contribution to the project, but his mark is nonetheless on our final product. Photos in this volume have been generously provided by Beth Quinn, Josie Virgin, and the National Interfaith Committee for Worker Justice.

This volume was reviewed by a number of people at various stages of development: David Bromley, Virginia Commonwealth University; Helen M. Hacker, New School for Social Research; Anson Shupe, Indiana UniversityPurdue University; and Rhys H. Williams, Southern Illinois University. We thank them for their incisive and constructive feedback.

The staff at Prentice-Hall—John Chillingworth, Nancy Roberts, and Allison Westlake—have been very supportive of this project, and very patient about working with a large and sometimes unwieldy bunch of people. We thank them as well. Finally, we have personal debts to Joni Emerson, Jim LeGrand, Jennifer Norman, Mandy Rager, Anne Monahan, and Tom Horgan for their support and assistance as we worked on this project.

Read on! We hope that you will find the study of religion and society to be as engaging and exciting as we do.

Susanne C. Monahan, Montana State University
William A. Mirola, Marian College
Michael O. Emerson, Rice University

Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

IN THIS SECTION:

1.) BRIEF TABLE OF CONTENTS

2.) COMPREHENSIVE TABLE OF CONTENTS

1. BRIEF TABLE OF CONTENTS:

Section I: Definitions of Religion

Section II: Religious Belief, Ritual and Experience

Section III: Immigration, Race and Religion

Section IV: Gender and Religion

Section V: Social Class and Religion

Section VI: Sexual Identity and religion

Section VII: The Secularization Debate

Section VIII: Religious Authority and Institutions

Section IX: New Religious Movements

Section X: Religion, Politics and Social Change

Section XI: Religious Violence

Section XII: Religion in a Globalized World

2. COMPREHENSIVE TABLE OF CONTENTS:

* indicates the reading is new to this edition

Section I: Definitions of Religion

Emile Durkheim: Subject of the Study: Religious Sociology and the Theory of Knowledge p. 1-6

Peter Berger: The Sacred Canopy p. 7-12

Karl Marx: From Contribution to the Critique of Hegel’s Philosophy of Religion p. 13-14

Brian J. Zinnbauer, et.al.: Religion and Spirituality: Unfuzzying the Fuzzy* p. 15-20

Section II: Religious Belief, Ritual and Experience

Emile Durkheim: The Principal Totemic Beliefs: The Toten as Name and as Emblem
• p. 21-23

Lynn Davidman and Arthur Greil: Characters in Search of a Script: The Exit Narratives of Formerly Ultra-Orthodox Jews* p. 24-35

Caitlin Killian: From a Community of Believers to an Islam of the Heart: ‘Conspicuous’ Symbols, Muslim Practices, and the Privatization of Religion in France* p. 36-44

Section III: Immigration, Race and Religion

Wendy Cadge and Elaine Howard Ecklund: Immigration and Religion: Current Research and Future Directions* p. 45-58

Carolyn Chen: Religious Varieties of Experience: A Comparison Between a Taiwanese Immigrant Buddhist Temple and an Evangelical Christian Church* p. 59-76

Timothy Nelson: Sacrifice of Praise: Emotion and Collective Participation in an African-American Worship Service p. 77-84

Gerardo Marti: Affinity, Identity and Transcendence: The Experience of Religion Racial Integration in Diverse Congregations* p. 85-95

Section IV: Gender and Religion

Linda Woodhead: Gendering Secularization Theory* p. 96-100

Jeri Altneu Sechzer: “Islam and Woman: Where Tradition Meets Modernity”* p. 101-108

Wendy Griffin: The Embodied Goddess p. 109-117

Ruth Wallace: The Social Construction of a New Leadership Role: Catholic Women Pastors p. 118-124

Section V: Social Class and Religion

Christian Smith and Robert Faris: Socioeconomic Inequality in the American Religious System* p. 125-134

Timothy Nelson: At Ease With Our Own Kind: Worship Practices and Class Segregation in American Religion* p. 135-146

Philip Schwadel: Poor Teenagers’ Religion* p. 147-165

Lisa Keister: Upward Wealth Mobility: Exploring the Roman Catholic Advantage* p. 166-184

Section VI: Sexual Identity and Religion

James Hunter: Culture Wars: The Challenge of Homosexuality p. 185-187

Laura Olson and Wendy Cadge: Talking About Homosexuality: The Views of Mainline Protestant Clergy* p. 188-202

Andrew Yip: Daring to Differ: Gay and Lesbian Catholic’s Official Assessment of Official Catholic Positions on Sexuality p. 203-208

Krista McQueeney: We Are God’s Children, Y’all* p. 209-228

Section VII: The Secularization Debate

Bryan Wilson: Secularization and Its Discontents pg. 229-237

Roger Finke: An Unsecular America pg. 238-249

Mark Chavez: Secularization as Declining Religious Authority* p. 250-264

N. J. Demerath: Secularization and Sacrilization: Deconstructed and Reconstructed* p. 265-284

Section VIII: Religious Authority and Institutions

Max Weber: Selections from Sociological Writings* p. 285-287

Fenggang Yang and Helen Rose Ebaugh: Transformation in New Immigrant Religions: Congregationalism* p. 288-297

Mark Chaves: All Creatures Great and Small: Megachurches in Context* p. 298-307

Section IX: New Religious Movements

Paul Olson: Public Perceptions of ‘Cults’ and ‘New Religious Movements’* p. 308-312

James Tabor: Apocalypse at Waco p. 313-318

Angela Coco and Ian Woodward: Discourses of Authenticity Within a Pagan Community: The Emergence of the ‘Fluffy Bunny’ Sanction* p. 319-326

Marybeth Ayella: ’They Must Be Crazy’: Some of the Difficulties in Researching ‘Cults’* p. 327-337

Section X: Religion, Politics and Social Change

Christian Smith: Correcting a Curious Neglect, or Bringing Religion Back In* p. 338-345

Mary Patillo-McCoy: Church Culture as a Strategy for Action* p. 346-353

Clyde Wilcox and Rachel Goldberg: Public Opinion on Church-State Issues in a Changing Environment* p. 354-361

D. Michael Lindsay: Evangelicals in the Power Elite: Elite Cohesion Advancing a Movement* p. 362-373

Section XI: Religious Violence

Thomas J. Badey: The Role of Religion in International Terrorism* p. 374-377

Jonathan Fine: What Motivates Terror? Contrasting Secular and Religious Terrorism* p. 378-387

Mark Juergensmeyer: Is Religion the Problem?* p. 388-396

James K. Wellman, Jr. and Tokuno Kyoko: Is Religious Violence Inevitable?* p. 397-402

Sharon Erickson Nepstad: Religion, Violence and Peacemaking* p. 403-408

Section XII: Religion in a Globalized World

Peggy Levitt: Redefining the Boundaries of Belonging: The Institutional Character of Transnational Religious Life* p. 409-419

Thomas Csordas: Global Religion and the Re-Enchantment of the World* p. 420-433

Robert Wuthnow and Stephen Offutt: Transnational Religious Connections* p. 434-448

Read More Show Less

Preface

Preface

Although we teach in very different settings—a mid-sized state university, a private Catholic college, and a private university—each of us looks forward to our opportunities to teach Sociology of Religion to undergraduate students. There is something about the study of the social aspects of religion that makes for a good class, a class that teaches itself. Students who take a Sociology of Religion class seem especially motivated to struggle with the material, and they typically have a wide range of personal experiences to draw upon as they apply abstract principles to instances of religion in their own lives.

The study of religion in modern society is an exciting enterprise. No matter what you are interested in—the structure and experiences of particular religious groups, the overall state of religion in society, religious belief, ritual and experience, the relation between religion and other social institutions—there is a plethora of resources including books, journals, and research monographs you can draw on. Unfortunately, however, securing copyright permissions for "course packets" has become increasingly complex and difficult. We hope that by constructing a reader that covers a broad range of topics we can meet our own needs as well as those of other instructors who teach in this area.

The focus of this reader is on the structure and culture of religion in the United States. Thus, many of the readings are about religion in the Christian tradition. Nonetheless, where it was feasible, we included readings about religion outside the American context (e.g., Poland, England, El Salvador, Nicaragua), and beyond theChristian tradition (e.g., Judaism, alternative religions, Hindu traditions). This reader is not intended to be a survey of religion, but rather an introduction to the social aspects of religion, particularly within the United States.

The readings are arranged by topic, and each topic has a brief introductory essay that outlines some key issues and orients students to the readings. Some of the essays focus on defining concepts related to the readings; others provide an overall framework students can use to understand how the readings fit together and what they contribute to our knowledge about the topic. We also include readings from popular sources—newspapers, magazines, and the like—to help students connect more abstract material with things that they see in their day-to-day lives. For instructors, we provide a cross-reference table that provides suggestions for other topics for which an article might be appropriate.

Following a brief introduction by Wade Clark Roof about what is most interesting and exciting in religion today, we present classical sociological definitions of religion by theorists including Emil Durkheim, Clifford Geertz, Karl Marx, and Peter Berger. In teaching the Sociology of Religion, we have been amazed at how much discussion these classical statements generate among students. We continue with sections that focus on the "stuff" of religion—belief, ritual, and religious experience. We then present several sections on how religion is related to various aspects of identity: race and ethnicity, gender, social class, and sexual identity. We put this material early in the volume because religious participation has a powerful ability to shape how we see ourselves-and how we interact with others.

Next, we move to structural concerns. We introduce students to the secularization debate that has raged recently in the sociology of religion: Is religion declining or is it thriving? We follow with sections on organizational aspects of official religion—authority, organizations, and institutions—and on alternative religions. Because religion does not exist in a vacuum, we also include sections examining the relationship between religion and different social institutions: media, politics, and science. We end with a section on the role of religion in social movements and social change.

Although this book covers a lot of topics, we certainly do not expect any one course to include all of the sections or readings. In other courses that we teach, we generally consider a reader to be useful if it can serve as the primary text for a course and if we can use at least one-half to two-thirds of the readings. Additionally, we have tried to organize sections according to common understandings of topics in Sociology of Religion, so that it can be used with a standard textbook or an existing syllabus of topics.

Our discussions about this book began when we were all participants in the Pew Charitable Trusts's Young Scholars of American Religion seminar series between 1997 and 1999. This seminar series was ably run by the Center for the Study of Religion and American Culture at Indiana University-Purdue University in Indianapolis. Conrad Cherry, Terry Grimm, and Bob Carpenter all had a hand in developing and implementing an intellectual endeavor that created lasting bonds—both professional and personal—among the participants.

By design, the Young Scholars seminars focused equally on the research and teaching endeavors of junior-level scholars of American religion. It was during our discussions of teaching that the idea of pulling together a reader for Sociology of Religion first emerged. Our colleagues in this seminar series contributed original essays to this volume, and we thank each of them: Lori Beamon, Patricia Chang, Eric Gormly, William MacDonald, Richard Wood, and Wendy Young. We also owe many thanks to Wade Clark Roof for providing expert, hands-off leadership in the seminar and an introduction to this volume. Conrad Kanagy, also a Young Scholar participant, was extremely helpful as we thought about whether to do this book and how to go about finding a publisher. His other responsibilities made it impossible for him to make a written contribution to the project, but his mark is nonetheless on our final product. Photos in this volume have been generously provided by Beth Quinn, Josie Virgin, and the National Interfaith Committee for Worker Justice.

This volume was reviewed by a number of people at various stages of development: David Bromley, Virginia Commonwealth University; Helen M. Hacker, New School for Social Research; Anson Shupe, Indiana UniversityPurdue University; and Rhys H. Williams, Southern Illinois University. We thank them for their incisive and constructive feedback.

The staff at Prentice-Hall—John Chillingworth, Nancy Roberts, and Allison Westlake—have been very supportive of this project, and very patient about working with a large and sometimes unwieldy bunch of people. We thank them as well. Finally, we have personal debts to Joni Emerson, Jim LeGrand, Jennifer Norman, Mandy Rager, Anne Monahan, and Tom Horgan for their support and assistance as we worked on this project.

Read on! We hope that you will find the study of religion and society to be as engaging and exciting as we do.

Susanne C. Monahan, Montana State University
William A. Mirola, Marian College
Michael O. Emerson, Rice University

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)