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Socksquatch
     

Socksquatch

by Frank W. Dormer
 

Poor Socksquatch. All he wants is two warm feet, but things aren't going his way. Even his friends can't help. AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA! What's a monster to do?

Frank Dormer's sweet, funny monster story will charm the socks off young readers.

Overview

Poor Socksquatch. All he wants is two warm feet, but things aren't going his way. Even his friends can't help. AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA! What's a monster to do?

Frank Dormer's sweet, funny monster story will charm the socks off young readers.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Where do all those single socks disappear to? The monster Socksquatch--who looks a lot like a kindergartner's drawing of a "scary" creature (orange fur, boxy head, fangs and horns)--might be one explanation. He only has one sock, and is desperately seeking another. "Got sock? Foot cold," he shouts, as he seeks assistance from his monster peers, speaking in classic--and highly fun to read--movie-monsterese. A barefoot werewolf, Wayne, can't help ("No sock. Just fur"); another monster, Frank (a takeoff on Frankenstein's monster) has a sock to spare, but it's too large, causing Socksquatch to tumble with a mighty "crunch." Luckily, a nice human is willing to lend Sock-squatch one of her socks, especially since it postpones her being carried off by a mummy. "S-O-O-O-C-K," coos the elated Socksquatch. Although slight at first glance, Dormer's (Supersister) naïf cartooning and simple silliness make this the kind of book that will probably get requested again and again. And what right-minded adult would pass up the chance to show off their best Boris Karloff impressions one more time? Ages 4–8. (Oct.)
From the Publisher

“Both the narrative and the setting--a medieval castle--are minimal elements in the book, so all expectations fall at the feet of the monsters, and they do not disappoint.” —Kirkus Reviews
School Library Journal
PreS-Gr 2—Missing any socks lately? The reason is spookier—and funnier—than kids could ever have imagined. Socksquatch is a hairy, horned yeti who's more cold-footed than cold-blooded. With flailing arms, pointed teeth, and one white sock, the big orange monster lumbers into a castle, calling, "Got sock? Foot cold." The characters and action are picture-perfect. The author-illustrator uses bold colors, kooky ink shapes, and dynamic frames that don't always succeed in containing their occupants. Wayne the werewolf has no socks, just fur. Frankenstein has a lovely long sock to offer, but it's too big. When Martin the mummy hears Socksquatch's wail and runs to help, he brings along an irate damsel and a perfect solution—for the time being. Even as the story ends on a happy note, the situation is unraveling. Dormer's hilarious, spot-on watercolor-and-ink illustrations make a monsterful hit with Socksquatch.—Susan Weitz, formerly at Spencer-Van Etten School District, Spencer, NY
Kirkus Reviews

Socksquatch is a creature of few words—"Got sock?" nearly exhausts his vocabulary—but of commanding presence: hairy barrel of a body, with striped antlers coming out of his block head, and primitive, very primitive. One of his socks has gone missing, as socks will do, and Socksquatch is in the market for a replacement. The tale introduces a few friends—Wayne (werewolf), Frank (enstein) and Martin (mummy)—to each of whom Dormer gives a comical twist and to each of whom Socksquatch puts the question: Got sock? Both the narrative and the setting--a medieval castle--are minimal elements in the book, so all expectations fall at the feet of the monsters, and they do not disappoint. They are drawn with a childlike hand, their menace muted, their arms outstretched in classic Boris Karloff mode. Even though their appearances are brief, they express enough character to make young readers wish to hold them dear, and they are ready to give Socksquatch the socks off their feet in the kind of spontaneous generosity that all little monsters need to cultivate. (Picture book. 3-6)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780805089523
Publisher:
Henry Holt and Co. (BYR)
Publication date:
10/12/2010
Edition description:
First Edition
Pages:
32
Sales rank:
955,439
Product dimensions:
8.27(w) x 8.51(h) x 0.42(d)
Age Range:
4 - 8 Years

Meet the Author

Frank Dormer lost his first sock on the way to the Savannah College of Art and Design. His students in his art class use socks for many things from painting to puppets. He lives with his wife and three boys in Branford, Connecticut.

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