Socrates and Alcibiades: Four Texts: Plato: Alcibiades I; Plato (?): Alcibiades II; Plate: Symposium (212c-223b); Aeschines of Sphettus: Alcibiades / Edition 1

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More About This Textbook

Overview


Socrates and Alcibiades: Four Texts gathers together translations our four most important sources for the relationship between Socrates and the most controversial man of his day, the gifted and scandalous Alcibiades. In addition to Alcibiades’ famous speech from Plato’s Symposium, this text includes two dialogues, the Alcibiades I and Alcibiades II, attributed to Plato in antiquity but unjustly neglected today, and the complete fragments of the dialogue Alcibiades by Plato’s contemporary, Aeschines of Sphettus. These works are essential reading for anyone interested in Socrates’ improbable love affair with Athens’ most desirable youth, his attempt to woo Alcibiades from his ultimately disastrous worldly ambitions to the philosophical life, and the reasons for Socrates’ failure, which played a large role in his conviction by an Athenian court on charges of impiety and corrupting the youth.

Focus Philosophical Library translations are close to and are non-interpretative of the original text, with the notes and a glossary intending to provide the reader with some sense of the terms and the concepts as they were understood by Plato’s immediate audience.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781585100699
  • Publisher: Focus Publishing/R. Pullins Company, Incorporated
  • Publication date: 10/28/2002
  • Series: Focus Philosophical Library
  • Edition description: New Edition
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 124
  • Sales rank: 742,494
  • Product dimensions: 6.00 (w) x 9.00 (h) x 0.32 (d)

Meet the Author


David Johnson is Assistant Professor at Southern Illinois University, Carbondale, where he teaches in the Classics Section of the Foreign Languages Department. He has published articles on Plato's Alcibiades I and Xenophon's depiction of Socrates.
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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 16, 2004

    From the translator

    If you're interested in Socrates or Alcibiades, give these lesser known texts a try. The largest and most important work I here introduce and translate is Plato's 'Alcibiades I'; it's little known because some scholars believe (without much good reason) that it's not by Plato. In it Socrates first convinces Alcibiades that he needs to understand justice if he is to lead Athens, then that he doesn't understand justice. They then discuss just what the 'self' in the famous 'Know thyself' really is. Also included are another dialogue with Alcibiades (the 'Alcibiades II', about how to pray to the gods: watch what you ask for!), Alcibiades' famous speech about Socrates from the 'Symposium', and the remains of the dialogue titled 'Alcibiades' by Aeschines of Sphettus, who was writing about Socrates at the same time that Plato was. [Excuse my five star ranking--Barnes & Noble insists that reviews include some ranking, so what was I to do?]

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