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Software Conflict 2.0

Overview

Software Conflict 2.0: The Art and Science of Software Engineering updates and expands a neglected classic in the field. The nearly 60 essays in this book--always easily digestible, often profound, and never too serious--are the work of pioneer Robert L. Glass, 50 year software veteran, and author or editor of more than 25 books, including the recent bestseller Facts and Fallacies of Software Engineering.

As loyal Glass readers have come to expect, Software Conflict 2.0 takes up...

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Overview

Software Conflict 2.0: The Art and Science of Software Engineering updates and expands a neglected classic in the field. The nearly 60 essays in this book--always easily digestible, often profound, and never too serious--are the work of pioneer Robert L. Glass, 50 year software veteran, and author or editor of more than 25 books, including the recent bestseller Facts and Fallacies of Software Engineering.

As loyal Glass readers have come to expect, Software Conflict 2.0 takes up large themes and important questions, never shying away from controversy. Robert Glass has a unique perspective, owing partly to his longevity in the field, partly to his breadth and depth of experience as a practitioner, and partly to his experiences on multiple continents crossing back and forth between the worlds of the university and the professional programming shop.

No matter what unique corner of the software engineering world you call home--be it aerospace or e-commerce--whether you are a researcher, hardcore coder, consultant, or manager, Software Conflict 2.0 tackles questions and conflicts that you will recognize. Bob Glass's wide and deep perspective on the art and science of software engineering will widen and deepen your own perspective.

Pragmatic Programmer Andy Hunt writes in his Foreword to this book, "Eleventh-century philosopher Pierre Abelard taught that, 'The beginning of wisdom is found in doubting; by doubting we come to the question, and by seeking we may come upon the truth.' Welcome to Bob's essays on software conflict. Here you'll find the seeds of doubt, some underlying questions, and a fellow seeker." We couldn't agree more.

The first edition of Software Conflict was published circa 1990 and, until now, has been out of print for some time. Why? Mainly because that¿s the normal pattern for software books: a new book is hot when it hits the streets, but then trends change, paradigms shift, and eventually the publisher stops placing orders with the printer. As hundreds of new books are published every year, a real treasure can be buried in the shifting sands.

Sometimes the significance of a software book transcends the endless cycle of trends and revolutions. In fact, some of the great software books continue to be discussed even decades after their original publication. Why do people keep reading these "dated" software engineering books?

Because the insights of these great books are timeless, as valid today as they were yesterday. Because these insights help us become better software professionals, better researchers, better managers. And because the writings of a computing pioneer like Robert L. Glass might just reveal something about where we are today and where we¿re headed.

Software Conflict 2.0 features six new essays by Robert Glass and a new Foreword by Andrew Hunt of the Pragmatic Programmers.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780977213306
  • Publisher: Read Media
  • Publication date: 3/10/2006
  • Pages: 308
  • Product dimensions: 7.50 (w) x 9.25 (h) x 0.65 (d)

Table of Contents

Foreword to the Second Edition (by Andrew Hunt)
Foreword to the First Edition (by Donald J. Reifer)
Preface to the First Edition
Preface to the Second Edition

AN OVERVIEW OF THE BATTLEGROUND
Which Comes First, Theory or Practice?
"Dangerous and Misleading"-A Look at Software Research via the Parnas Papers
"No Silver Bullet"-A Look at Software Research via Fred Brooks
A Report from the Best and Brightest
Retrospective

FROM THE TECHNICAL TRENCHES
The Cognitive View: A Different Look at Software Design
Some Thoughts on Software Errors
An Experimental View of Software Error Removal
The Many Flavors of Testing
The Link Between Software Quality and Software Maintenance
Software Maintenance Is a Solution, Not a Problem
Single-Point Control
User-Friendly-Buzzword or Breakthrough?
Retrospective

THE LATEST IN WEAPONRY
Methodologies
Reuse: Software Parts-Nostalgia and Déjà vu
Automatic Programming-A Cocktail Party Myth?
Some Thoughts on Prototyping
Standards and Enforcers: Do They Really Help Achieve Software Quality?
Tools
Recommended: A Minimum Standard Software Toolset
Just in CASE: A Look at Software's Latest "Breakthrough"
Looking at the Numbers; CASE and 4GLs: What's the Payoff?
What's Wrong with Compiler Writing?
Languages
High-Order Language: How High Is Up?
Should We Prepare for a 4GL Future?
What's Really Wrong with COBOL?
Retrospective

FROM THE COMMAND POST
Achieving Greatness in the Software World
A New Way of Looking at Software Productivity
Productivity and Theory G
Barry Boehm's "Theory W" Principle of Software Project Management
Software Productivity Improvement: Who's Doing What?
Software metrics: Of Lightning Rods and Built-Up Tension
Quality Measurement: Less Masquerading as More
Can You MANAGE Quality into a Software Product?
The Legend of the Bad Software Project
Would You Buy a Used Car from King Ludwig?
The Real Secrets of Consulting, by Nicholas Zvegintzov
A Look into the Past of the Futurist
User Support: There's More Here than Meets the Eye
Retrospective

FROM THE LABORATORIES
Research
Structured Research? (A Partly Tongue-in-Cheek Look)
The (Solved, Unsolved) Problem of Literature Searches
A Tiny Controversy: Some Pros and Cons on (of all things!) References
Technology Transfer
How About Next Year? A Look at a Study of Technology Maturation
Software Technology Transfer: A MultiFlawed Process (The Road to Productivity Is Full of Potholes)
A Mythology of Technology Transfer
Education
Software Learning: A New Source of Information
An Open Letter to Computer Science Professors
Retrospective

A POSTMORTEM OF THE BATTLEGROUND
How Can Computer Science truly Become a Science, and Software Engineering Truly Become Engineering?
My Trivial/Brilliant Concept Called "Problem Solving"
Software Failure: Why Does It Happen?
The Importance of the Application Domain Cluster
Can You Help Me Find It?
An Ode to the Software Young at Heart
Retrospective

Epilog
Appendix
Index
About the Author
Contributors
Design Notes
About the Publisher

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