Software Systems Architecture: Working With Stakeholders Using Viewpoints and Perspectives [NOOK Book]

Overview

Software Systems Architecture is a practitioner-oriented guide to designing and implementing effective architectures for information systems. It is both a readily accessible introduction to software architecture and an invaluable handbook of well-established best practices. It shows why the role of the architect is central to any successful information-systems development project, and, by presenting a set of architectural viewpoints and perspectives, provides specific direction for improving your own and your ...

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Software Systems Architecture: Working With Stakeholders Using Viewpoints and Perspectives

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Overview

Software Systems Architecture is a practitioner-oriented guide to designing and implementing effective architectures for information systems. It is both a readily accessible introduction to software architecture and an invaluable handbook of well-established best practices. It shows why the role of the architect is central to any successful information-systems development project, and, by presenting a set of architectural viewpoints and perspectives, provides specific direction for improving your own and your organization's approach to software systems architecture.

With this book you will learn how to

  • Design an architecture that reflects and balances the different needs of its stakeholders
  • Communicate the architecture to stakeholders and demonstrate that it has met their requirements
  • Focus on architecturally significant aspects of design, including frequently overlooked areas such as performance, resilience, and location
  • Use scenarios and patterns to drive the creation and validation of your architecture
  • Document your architecture as a set of related views
  • Use perspectives to ensure that your architecture exhibits important qualities such as performance, scalability, and security

The architectural viewpoints and perspectives presented in the book also provide a valuable long-term reference source for new and experienced architects alike.

Whether you are an aspiring or practicing software architect, you will find yourself referring repeatedly to the practical advice in this book throughout the lifecycle of your projects.

A supporting Web site containing further information can be found at viewpoints-and-perspectives.info

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780768684995
  • Publisher: Pearson Education
  • Publication date: 5/4/2005
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 576
  • Sales rank: 456,485
  • File size: 9 MB

Meet the Author

Nick Rozanski is an enterprise technical architect at Marks and Spencer, where he focuses on integration and workflow. During his more than twenty years of experience he has worked for companies such as Logica, Capgemini, and Sybase. His technology experience covers enterprise application integration, relational databases, and object-oriented software development. He is also an experienced technical instructor and certified internal project auditor.

Eoin Woods is a principal consultant at Züehlke Engineering in London, where he works as a consultant software architect focusing on trading and investment management companies in the financial markets. He has worked in the software engineering field for fifteen years with a number of companies, including Ford Motor Company, Groupe Bull, InterTrust Technologies, and Sybase.

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Table of Contents

Preface.

Acknowledgments.

About the Authors.

1. Introduction.

Stakeholders, Viewpoints, and Perspectives.

The Structure of This Book.

Who Should Read This Book.

Conventions Used.

I. ARCHITECTURE FUNDAMENTALS.

2. Software Architecture Concepts.

Software Architecture.

Architectural Elements.

Stakeholders.

Architectural Descriptions.

Interrelationships between the Core Concepts.

Summary.

Further Reading.

3. Viewpoints and Views.

Architectural Views.

Viewpoints.

Interrelationships between the Core Concepts.

The Benefits of Using Viewpoints and Views.

Viewpoint Pitfalls.

Our Viewpoint Catalog.

Summary.

Further Reading.

4. Architectural Perspectives.

Quality Properties.

Architectural Perspectives.

Applying Perspectives to Views.

Consequences of Applying a Perspective.

Interrelationships between the Core Concepts.

The Benefits of Using Perspectives.

Perspective Pitfalls.

Our Perspective Catalog.

Summary.

Further Reading.

5. The Role of the Software Architect.

The Architecture Definition Process.

The Role of the Architect.

Interrelationships between the Core Concepts.

Architectural Specializations.

The Organizational Context.

The Architect's Skills.

The Architect's Responsibilities.

Summary.

Further Reading.

II. THE PROCESS OF SOFTWARE ARCHITECTURE.

6. Introduction to the Software Architecture Process.

7. The Architecture Definition Process.

Guiding Principles.

Process Outcomes.

The Process Context.

Supporting Activities.

Architecture Definition Activities.

Process Exit Criteria.

Architecture Definition in the Software Development Lifecycle.

Summary.

Further Reading.

8. Scope, Concerns, Principles, and Constraints.

Business Goals and Drivers.

Architectural Scope.

Architectural Concerns.

Architectural Principles.

Other Architectural Constraints.

Checklist.

Summary.

Further Reading.

9. Identifying and Engaging Stakeholders.

Selection of Stakeholders.

Classes of Stakeholders.

Examples.

Proxy Stakeholders.

Stakeholder Groups.

Stakeholders' Responsibilities.

Checklist.

Summary.

Further Reading.

10. Identifying and Using Scenarios.

Types of Scenarios.

Uses for Scenarios.

Identifying and Prioritizing Scenarios.

Capturing Scenarios.

Applying Scenarios.

Effective Use of Scenarios.

Checklist.

Summary.

Further Reading.

11. Using Styles and Patterns.

Software Patterns.

Styles, Patterns, and Idioms.

An Example of an Architectural Style.

The Benefits of Using Architectural Styles.

Styles and the Architectural Description.

Common Architectural Styles.

Design Patterns and Language Idioms in Architecture.

Checklist.

Summary.

Further Reading.

12. Producing Architectural Models.

Why Models Are Important.

Types of Models.

Modeling Languages.

Guidelines for Creating Effective Models.

Agile Modeling Techniques.

Checklist.

Summary.

Further Reading.

13. Creating the Architectural Description.

Properties of an Effective Architectural Description.

Glossaries.

The IEEE Standard.

Contents of the Architectural Description.

Checklist.

Summary.

Further Reading.

14. Validating the Architecture.

Why Validate the Architecture?

Validation Techniques.

Scenario-Based Evaluation Methods.

Validation during the Software Lifecycle.

Recording the Results of Validation.

Checklist.

Summary.

Further Reading.

III. THE VIEWPOINT CATALOG.

15. Introduction to the Viewpoint Catalog.

16. The Functional Viewpoint.

Concerns.

Models.

Problems and Pitfalls.

Checklist.

Further Reading.

17. The Information Viewpoint.

Concerns.

Models.

Problems and Pitfalls.

Checklist.

Further Reading.

18. The Concurrency Viewpoint.

Concerns.

Models.

Problems and Pitfalls.

Checklist.

Further Reading.

19. The Development Viewpoint.

Concerns.

Models.

Problems and Pitfalls.

Checklist.

Further Reading.

20. The Deployment Viewpoint.

Concerns.

Models.

Problems and Pitfalls.

Checklist.

Further Reading.

21. The Operational Viewpoint.

Concerns.

Models.

Problems and Pitfalls.

Checklist.

Further Reading.

22. Achieving Consistency across Views.

Relationships between Views.

Functional and Information View Consistency.

Functional and Concurrency View Consistency.

Functional and Development View Consistency.

Functional and Deployment View Consistency.

Functional and Operational View Consistency.

Information and Concurrency View Consistency.

Information and Development View Consistency.

Information and Deployment View Consistency.

Information and Operational View Consistency.

Concurrency and Development View Consistency.

Concurrency and Deployment View Consistency.

Deployment and Operational View Consistency.

IV. THE PERSPECTIVE CATALOG.

23. Introduction to the Perspective Catalog.

24. The Security Perspective.

Applicability to Views.

Concerns.

Activities: Applying the Security Perspective.

Architectural Tactics.

Problems and Pitfalls.

Checklists.

Further Reading.

25. The Performance and Scalability Perspective.

Applicability to Views.

Concerns.

Activities: Applying the Performance and Scalability Perspective.

Architectural Tactics.

Problems and Pitfalls.

Checklists.

Further Reading.

26. The Availability and Resilience Perspective.

Applicability to Views.

Concerns.

Activities: Applying the Availability and Resilience Perspective.

Architectural Tactics.

Problems and Pitfalls.

Checklists.

Further Reading.

27. The Evolution Perspective.

Applicability to Views.

Concerns.

Activities: Applying the Evolution Perspective.

Architectural Tactics.

Problems and Pitfalls.

Checklists.

Further Reading.

28. Other Perspectives.

The Accessibility Perspective.

The Development Resource Perspective.

The Internationalization Perspective.

The Location Perspective.

The Regulation Perspective.

The Usability Perspective.

V. PUTTING IT ALL TOGETHER.

29. Working as a Software Architect.

The Architect in the Project Lifecycle.

The Architect in Different Types of Projects.

Appendix: Other Viewpoint Sets.

Kruchten "4+1".

RM-ODP.

Siemens (Hofmeister, Nord, and Soni).

SEI Viewtypes.

Garland and Anthony.

Bibliography.

Index.

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Sort by: Showing all of 3 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 1, 2006

    explains the job of a system architect

    The authors give the reader detailed and useful suggestions about designing a software system. It should be made clear that this is not a programming book. Coding particulars are at a finer level outside the book's scope. The book is addressed to the software architect. Which can be rather a vague job role. One merit of the book is that it can be used to define what a software architect does. While the authors might not claim to encompass everything in your job description, perhaps what is given here is your core responsibility. So the text shows how to identify and use scenarios, to build sets of scenarios. And yet be able to construct inherently different scenarios. A vital feature of making the scenarios is how it involves the stakeholders very early in the design. Vital in preventing misunderstandings about undesigned or unneeded functionalities, before they get built into the system. Then, given a system, the text explains how to document it using UML. The latter is extremely useful. Both for programmers who might have to design to it, and for the stakeholders. The visual nature of UML helps make it understandable to both parties.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 23, 2006

    An approach for everyone ..not just software types

    This book provides a good level of detail and an excellent approach to architecting complex Systems. UML concepts and diagrams are used in a manner that is clear and relevant to the architectural level - most books delve into the 'trees' and almost don't acknowledge the 'forest' - this one does a great job and helped me develop an architectural 'blueprint' for a system that my team and I are developing and deploying.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 20, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

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