Solar Cataclysm: How the Sun Shaped the Past and What We Can Do to Save Our Future

Solar Cataclysm: How the Sun Shaped the Past and What We Can Do to Save Our Future

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by Lawrence E. Joseph
     
 

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Science journalist and futurist Lawrence Joseph has studied the unprecedented solar storms since the last ice age and in Solar Cataclysm he reveals the monumental ecological, biological, emotional, political, financial, and cultural effects they have had in the past, and will ultimately have on humanity’s future. This timely, fascinating, and relevant…  See more details below

Overview

Science journalist and futurist Lawrence Joseph has studied the unprecedented solar storms since the last ice age and in Solar Cataclysm he reveals the monumental ecological, biological, emotional, political, financial, and cultural effects they have had in the past, and will ultimately have on humanity’s future. This timely, fascinating, and relevant book from the bestselling author of Apocalypse 2012 sounds an intelligent and urgent warning about the possible catastrophic consequences we will face in the coming years if we don’t listen to what the sun is trying to tell us. Popular science fans who made The World Without Us a runaway bestseller, readers open to new angles on history like those presented in Guns, Germs, and Steel, and anyone who is concerned about tomorrow and what we can do to ensure humankind’s survival must read Solar Cataclysm.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Futurist and science writer Joseph (Apocalypse 2012) describes the fascinating and subtle science underlying his “Moody Sun Hypothesis,” asserting that variations in the Sun’s radiation output have influenced history, climate, birthrates, migration trends, even the stock market (sunspot and solar flare activity cause disturbances in the electromagnetic field that can affect the brain and one’s judgment). Although ancient Babylonians recorded observations of sunspots around 1000 B.C.E., Aristotle’s ideas of “heavenly perfection” led the Church to deny the existence of sunspots until early telescopes proved otherwise. Measurements show that decreases in solar activity coincide with declines in Earth’s temperatures. Joseph discusses evidence for what scientists call the Medieval Warm Period (900–1200 C.E.) and the subsequent “Little Ice Age” (1300–1750), when long winters and damp, chilly summers brought crop failures, famine, and political collapse. After a strong argument that global warming, though largely the result of human activity, is partly due to the Sun’s variability, Joseph looks at biological effects, such as skin cancer and the value of phototherapy (the use of light to treat skin diseases and mental disorders). Joseph’s argument is provocative food for thought for science readers. Agent: Andrew Stuart, the Stuart Agency. (Oct.)
Tim LaHaye
“Fascinating...incredible research and an equally incredible sense of humor.”

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780062061935
Publisher:
HarperCollins Publishers
Publication date:
09/25/2012
Sold by:
HARPERCOLLINS
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
288
File size:
584 KB

What People are saying about this

Tim LaHaye
“Fascinating...incredible research and an equally incredible sense of humor.”

Meet the Author

LAWRENCE E. JOSEPH is a futurist and the author of several books, including Apocalypse 2012. For decades, Joseph has written on science, nature, politics, and business for publications including the New York Times, Discover, and Salon. He currently blogs for The Huffington Post. In demand as a speaker, Joseph has given more than five hundred film, television, radio, and print interviews on the subject of solar EMP and other Sun–Earth phenomena.

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Solar Cataclysm: How the Sun Shaped the Past and What We Can Do to Save Our Future 4.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 4 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Crawls in and sleeps.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
EclipseClan
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
An insulated, comfortable den with soft moss spread on the floor. ~Sunsetstar
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I read this as an e-book. I will probably also purchase a hard copy so I can mark it up. I also have a greater tendency than most to purchase hard copies because I know that if/when the next Carrington Event hits, I will be left unable to use my e-versions of books, magazines, and newspapers. For instance, I have both an electric piano and an acoustic one. Just a few weeks ago, I lived through an electrical outage of several hours, entertaining myself by playing my acoustic piano by the light of a couple of orchestra lights. Later, I found that my neighbors had enjoyed my "concert". In this book, there was a surprising amount of chit-chat about all kinds of things. The writing style was not scholarly, but conversational. Perhaps because of that, it tended to "chase rabbits" about things that, IMHO, are only tangentially related to the issue at hand: what would happen when/if the next massive solar flare (such as the Carrington Event) takes place. There was a continuing thread that talked about "Sol" and "Gaia" and their "relationship". It was annoying to me, but I guess it's a time-tested technique used when talking about cosmic matters to a lay audience. After all, mythological stories tend to personify the planets as gods. I was glad to see this book as coming from NASA, because when I try to talk to my friends about when/if the next Carrington Event takes place, their eyes tend to glaze over. Most of them are not scientists. I was hoping to be able to recommend this book to my friends, to get them thinking about what would happen if all our electrical infrastructure collapsed. Most people tend to pay attention when something comes from NASA. Because it so full of fluff, I will have to think twice before recommending it. If a person doesn't already have an idea what would happen, how to mitigate it, and how to protect their own interests, I'm not sure they would get the message from this book. The few nuggets of value that I found (valuable to me because I didn't already know them) included mostly names of players who are involved in efforts to predict and deal with a solar cataclysm.