Soldier's Secret: The Story of Deborah Sampson

( 2 )

Overview

In the 1700s, women’s responsibilities were primarily child rearing and household duties. But Deborah Sampson wanted more from life. She wanted to read, to travel—and to fight for her country’s independence. When the colonies went to war with the British in 1775, Deborah was intent on being part of the action. Seeing no other option, she disguised herself in a man’s uniform and served in the Continental army for more than a year, her identity hidden from her fellow soldiers.

...

See more details below
Paperback
$13.77
BN.com price
(Save 23%)$17.99 List Price

Pick Up In Store

Reserve and pick up in 60 minutes at your local store

Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (7) from $10.84   
  • New (5) from $10.84   
  • Used (2) from $14.05   
Soldier's Secret: The Story of Deborah Sampson

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • NOOK HD/HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK Study
  • NOOK for Web

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook - First Edition)
$7.99
BN.com price
Note: Kids' Club Eligible. See More Details.

Overview

In the 1700s, women’s responsibilities were primarily child rearing and household duties. But Deborah Sampson wanted more from life. She wanted to read, to travel—and to fight for her country’s independence. When the colonies went to war with the British in 1775, Deborah was intent on being part of the action. Seeing no other option, she disguised herself in a man’s uniform and served in the Continental army for more than a year, her identity hidden from her fellow soldiers.

Accomplished writer Sheila Solomon Klass creates a gripping firstperson account of an extraordinary woman who lived a life full of danger, adventure, and intrigue.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
Praise for SOLDIER’S SECRET:

* “Klass expertly fills in the gaps, drawing a portrait of a proud girl who, from her early fascination with Joan of Arc, becomes entranced with the idea of a real-life ‘heroine.’. . . An admirable accomplishment.” —Booklist, starred review

“The real-life Deborah Sampson’s experiences dressing as a man for two years to serve as a soldier during the Revolutionary War form the foundation of Klass’s provocative historical novel. . . . It’s Klass’s telling use of details that brings this story to life.” —Publishers Weekly

“The writing is clear and concise, and Deborah’s voice rings with authenticity. An excellent choice for fans of historical fiction, fictionalized biographies, and stories about brave women.” —School Library Journal

Publishers Weekly

The real-life Deborah Sampson's experiences dressing as a man for two years to serve as a soldier during the Revolutionary War form the foundation of Klass's (The Uncivil War) provocative historical novel. The story starts with a terrific hook: hospitalized with yellow fever, the soldier/narrator known as Robert Shurtliff pretends to be dead to evade examination by the nurses: "Being buried alive [was] a terrible fate, but preferable to being discovered," claims the narrator, who has yet to disclose Shurtliff's real identity. As the grave diggers fight over Shurtliff's boots, a nurse realizes her patient is still alive, leading to a doctor's discovery that the patient is female. Bringing her to his home to recover in safety, he persuades her to write down her story. Readers then learn that Sampson was a "give-away child," passed into indentured servitude because her mother was unable to support her. Finally freed, she still feels hampered by the stringent restrictions placed on women and begins to disguise herself as a man. At times Sampson comes across as self-absorbed; it's Klass's telling use of details that brings this story to life. Ages 12-16. (Mar.)

Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
Children's Literature - Phyllis Kennemer
Deborah Sampson was an actual woman who disguised herself as a man and served in the Continental Army during the Revolutionary War. Some basic facts are known about her. She was born in 1760; she was a give-away child (thus spent her childhood in servitude); she enlisted in the Army in 1782 as Robert Shurtliff; and she received an honorable discharge in 1783. Klass offers a fictionalized version with invented details presenting her version about how Sampson successfully fooled Army officers, fellow soldiers and others into believing she was a man. Told as a first-person narrative, the story begins with Sampson's near-death injuries and an examination by a doctor who discovers her secret. He has her transported to his home and gives her paper and pen to write about her experiences as she is recovering. These memories related in a conversational tone offer plausible explanations about Sampson, her motivations, and her achievements. An author's note in the back relates documented information and identifies imaginary characters and happenings. A chronology of Sampson's life and significant dates of the Revolutionary War are also included. Reviewer: Phyllis Kennemer, Ph.D.
School Library Journal

Gr 6-10

This novel is based on the life of a woman who, at the age of 21, disguised herself as a man and enlisted in the Fourth Massachusetts Regiment of the Continental army. The story begins in the last months of the war with Deborah grievously ill and the secret of her gender discovered by a military doctor. Instead of exposing her deception, he arranges for her private care and insists that she write down her story. What follows is her accounting of her life: a difficult childhood, why she enlisted, how she maintained her disguise while surrounded by male soldiers, what battles she fought in, and the wounds she received. Encouraged by the doctor who saved her life, Deborah reveals her secret to a general and receives an honorable discharge. What is known and documented about Sampson's life is seamlessly incorporated into the novel; Klass has thoughtfully imagined the missing details to create a compelling story. She does not dwell on the brutality of war, but focuses on the protagonist's character, the danger of her deception, and the trials of maintaining her disguise. There is a sad, thwarted romance and a few comic moments when an amorous young woman sets her sights on the disguised soldier. The writing is clear and concise, and Deborah's voice rings with authenticity. An excellent choice for fans of historical fiction, fictionalized biographies, and stories about brave women.-Caroline Tesauro, Radford Public Library, VA

Kirkus Reviews
Signing a proclamation on May 23, 1983, Governor Michael Dukakis named Deborah Sampson an "Official Heroine of the State of Massachusetts," the first person ever to be so honored. Sampson, fiercely patriotic, fought in the American Revolution, taking the name of her deceased older brother, Robert Shurtliff. She had been a "give-away child," abandoned by her father and given up by her mother, and after ten years of indentured servitude, she became a "masterless" woman and ran off to war to avoid marriage. Rooting her tale in the facts of Sampson's story and inventing dialogue, a romance and supporting characters, Klass tells Sampson/Shurtliff's wartime saga as a tale like Scheherazade's, with Deborah writing the stories to earn the silence of her attending physician. And an engrossing tale it is, of a woman's journey in a man's war, offering a fascinating portrait of a new nation emerging from the crucible of war, disease and political upheaval. A good match with Anita Silvey's I'll Pass for Your Comrade (2008). (author's note, chronology) (Historical fiction. 12-16)
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780805097399
  • Publisher: Henry Holt and Co. (BYR)
  • Publication date: 3/31/2009
  • Pages: 224
  • Sales rank: 400,453
  • Age range: 11 - 15 Years
  • Product dimensions: 5.00 (w) x 7.80 (h) x 0.60 (d)

Meet the Author

SHEILA SOLOMON KLASS has been writing fiction for young adults for nearly five decades. Her books include The Uncivil War; Shooting Star: A Novel About Annie Oakley; and Little Women Next Door. Ms. Klass lives in New York City.

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 5
( 2 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(2)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing all of 2 Customer Reviews
  • Posted March 8, 2011

    Perfect

    I had to do a hero project and it gave me the most info. out of any website. I didn't want to go to a website because all of my info. came from here great book I recomend it. : ) 6th grader

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 17, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing all of 2 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)