Solid Modeling with I-DEAS(TM) / Edition 1

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Overview

Solid Modeling with I-DEAS by Sheryl Sorby teaches students how to use I-DEAS as a powerful tool for design. It takes a true 3-D approach emphasizing how modeling is inherently different from 2-D CAD. Beginning with a brief introduction to the design process in the context of concurrent engineering, this text proceeds to cover topics such as the I-DEAS work environment, file management, sketching, revolution, applying and modeling 3-D constraints, features and feature-based modeling, lofting, sweeping, and extracting data from 3-D models. Sorby encourages students "to learn by doing." Each chapter includes a set of "Guided Tours" that walk students through features of I-DEAS. Chapters conclude with an ample number of drawing problems.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780134901862
  • Publisher: Pearson Education
  • Publication date: 8/4/1999
  • Edition description: Older Edition
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 200
  • Product dimensions: 8.64 (w) x 10.92 (h) x 0.48 (d)

Read an Excerpt

PREFACE:

Preface

The intent of this text is to teach the reader about constraint-based solid modeling by focusing on the functionality and use of a single software package: SDRC I-DEAS. The text was written using I-DEAS Master Series 5; however, because its user interface is relatively stable, I believe that the book would be adequate for use with Master Series 6 also. The specific differences that I have found between the two versions are: the I-DEAS Start Form (Figure 2-1) is slightly different; in order to obtain the Plotting Form (Figure 2-5), you must now click a button on the first form that appears when plotting is selected from the menu; the Manage Bins Form (Figure 2-8) has been reworked; and Assembly Constraints (Section 10.2) have been reworked so that they are more closely aligned with drawing constraints. Other subtle differences are also incorporated into the newer version of the software (e.g., the user will be prompted to verify before an object can be deleted) but most changes are relatively selfexplanatory.

The first chapter is meant to be an introduction to design in the context of computer tools and concurrent engineering. The second chapter describes the I-DEAS work environment and file management strategies. The third chapter deals with the ways that three-dimensional (3-D) geometry can be displayed on a computer screen and in hard copy. Although it may seem that Chapters 2 and 3 are putting the cart before the horse (how can we talk about file management and the display of 3-D objects before we have learned to create such objects?), these chapters are meant to serve more as reference material than anything else. I simply did notwant to interrupt the flow of the process of creating and editing objects to insert these topics later on. In Chapter 4, we start to learn about how to build objects by using basic sketching and extrusion/revolution techniques. Chapter 5 covers applying and modifying two-dimensional (2-D) constraints. Again, it may seem more logical to order the topics in the sequence of sketching, 2-D constraints, and then extrusion/revolution; however, since I-DEAS is based on a design philosophy of "shape, then size," I believe it is best to first show the students how to sketch (a relatively easy task) and then show them how to extrude/revolve (also relatively easy), so that they can finally have a 3-D object on the screen. After they have gained confidence in their ability to create 3-D objects with the correct shape, we move on to the topic of constraints—a fairly difficult concept for students to grasp. I believe that students who already understand the basics of the creation of simple parts have a better understanding of constraints than those who must learn to apply constraints before any modeling has been accomplished. Chapter 6 covers features and feature-based modeling, and Chapter 7 examines the orientation and modification of parts. Advanced modeling techniques such as lofting and sweeping are covered in Chapter 8. I have found that by the time the students reach this point, they usually are familiar enough with the concepts involved in three-dimensional modeling and can grasp lofting and sweeping fairly rapidly. Chapter 9 discusses the setting up of a part in a drafting layout. Detail drafting is not covered in this text because the focus is meant to be on 3-D modeling, not 2-D drafting. Chapter 10 serves as a brief introduction to assembly modeling.

When I teach my course in solid modeling, I usually tell the students two things on the first day of class. First, and foremost, I inform them that I will not be teaching them how to use the software. The only way that they can learn the software is by sitting in front of the computer and using the software. I will serve as their "tour guide" through the software. I can show them shortcuts and help them focus on certain techniques, but I cannot teach them how to use the software—they must do that by themselves. Second, I tell them that if they have previous experience with a 2-D drafting package, such as AutoCAD, they should check that knowledge at the door. I have seen many people struggle to learn IDEAS because they try to force the software to act like a 2-D drafting package. In fact, in evaluating the course he had just taken, one student commented that he felt he was at a disadvantage because he had had a lot of previous AutoCAD experience! I try to illustrate the difference between 2-D CAD and 3-D modeling by asking students to imagine the different approaches they would take if they were going to draw me a picture of a table versus if they were going to build me a table out of plywood, nails, a frame, and legs. Most students can easily see that drawing a picture of a table is inherently different than building the table itself.

The exercises in each chapter are meant to reinforce topics from the chapter; however, in many cases, exercises could be used interchangeably between chapters. For example, although Chapter 5 covers 2-D constraints, the exercises in that chapter do not merely ask the students to create a constrained sketch; rather, they are to create a 3-D part from a sketch that they have constrained to the correct shape and size. Similarly, in Chapter 9, drafting setups of any object from any exercise in the text could be assigned (preferably a previously created object). Also, if the instructor decides to cover assemblies, it may be easier to assign the various parts for the system beforehand, so that when assemblies are discussed, the students need only establish a hierarchy and go from there. In this way, students often find problems with models they have previously created and must go back and edit them to make them work within the system, which is itself a good learning experience. Another good source for homework assignments is engineering graphics texts.

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Table of Contents

Ch. 1 Engineering Design 1
Ch. 2 User Interface and File Management in I-DEAS Software 5
Ch. 3 Displaying 3-D Objects 18
Ch. 4 Creating 3-D Parts from 2-D Geometry 32
Ch. 5 Two-Dimensional Constraints 62
Ch. 6 Construction Techniques 86
Ch. 7 Modifying Objects 123
Ch. 8 Advanced Modeling Techniques 149
Ch. 9 Extracting Data from 3-D Models 168
Ch. 10 Assembly Modeling 194
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Preface

PREFACE:

Preface

The intent of this text is to teach the reader about constraint-based solid modeling by focusing on the functionality and use of a single software package: SDRC I-DEAS. The text was written using I-DEAS Master Series 5; however, because its user interface is relatively stable, I believe that the book would be adequate for use with Master Series 6 also. The specific differences that I have found between the two versions are: the I-DEAS Start Form (Figure 2-1) is slightly different; in order to obtain the Plotting Form (Figure 2-5), you must now click a button on the first form that appears when plotting is selected from the menu; the Manage Bins Form (Figure 2-8) has been reworked; and Assembly Constraints (Section 10.2) have been reworked so that they are more closely aligned with drawing constraints. Other subtle differences are also incorporated into the newer version of the software (e.g., the user will be prompted to verify before an object can be deleted) but most changes are relatively selfexplanatory.

The first chapter is meant to be an introduction to design in the context of computer tools and concurrent engineering. The second chapter describes the I-DEAS work environment and file management strategies. The third chapter deals with the ways that three-dimensional (3-D) geometry can be displayed on a computer screen and in hard copy. Although it may seem that Chapters 2 and 3 are putting the cart before the horse (how can we talk about file management and the display of 3-D objects before we have learned to create such objects?), these chapters are meant to serve more as reference material than anything else. I simply didnotwant to interrupt the flow of the process of creating and editing objects to insert these topics later on. In Chapter 4, we start to learn about how to build objects by using basic sketching and extrusion/revolution techniques. Chapter 5 covers applying and modifying two-dimensional (2-D) constraints. Again, it may seem more logical to order the topics in the sequence of sketching, 2-D constraints, and then extrusion/revolution; however, since I-DEAS is based on a design philosophy of "shape, then size," I believe it is best to first show the students how to sketch (a relatively easy task) and then show them how to extrude/revolve (also relatively easy), so that they can finally have a 3-D object on the screen. After they have gained confidence in their ability to create 3-D objects with the correct shape, we move on to the topic of constraints—a fairly difficult concept for students to grasp. I believe that students who already understand the basics of the creation of simple parts have a better understanding of constraints than those who must learn to apply constraints before any modeling has been accomplished. Chapter 6 covers features and feature-based modeling, and Chapter 7 examines the orientation and modification of parts. Advanced modeling techniques such as lofting and sweeping are covered in Chapter 8. I have found that by the time the students reach this point, they usually are familiar enough with the concepts involved in three-dimensional modeling and can grasp lofting and sweeping fairly rapidly. Chapter 9 discusses the setting up of a part in a drafting layout. Detail drafting is not covered in this text because the focus is meant to be on 3-D modeling, not 2-D drafting. Chapter 10 serves as a brief introduction to assembly modeling.

When I teach my course in solid modeling, I usually tell the students two things on the first day of class. First, and foremost, I inform them that I will not be teaching them how to use the software. The only way that they can learn the software is by sitting in front of the computer and using the software. I will serve as their "tour guide" through the software. I can show them shortcuts and help them focus on certain techniques, but I cannot teach them how to use the software—they must do that by themselves. Second, I tell them that if they have previous experience with a 2-D drafting package, such as AutoCAD, they should check that knowledge at the door. I have seen many people struggle to learn IDEAS because they try to force the software to act like a 2-D drafting package. In fact, in evaluating the course he had just taken, one student commented that he felt he was at a disadvantage because he had had a lot of previous AutoCAD experience! I try to illustrate the difference between 2-D CAD and 3-D modeling by asking students to imagine the different approaches they would take if they were going to draw me a picture of a table versus if they were going to build me a table out of plywood, nails, a frame, and legs. Most students can easily see that drawing a picture of a table is inherently different than building the table itself.

The exercises in each chapter are meant to reinforce topics from the chapter; however, in many cases, exercises could be used interchangeably between chapters. For example, although Chapter 5 covers 2-D constraints, the exercises in that chapter do not merely ask the students to create a constrained sketch; rather, they are to create a 3-D part from a sketch that they have constrained to the correct shape and size. Similarly, in Chapter 9, drafting setups of any object from any exercise in the text could be assigned (preferably a previously created object). Also, if the instructor decides to cover assemblies, it may be easier to assign the various parts for the system beforehand, so that when assemblies are discussed, the students need only establish a hierarchy and go from there. In this way, students often find problems with models they have previously created and must go back and edit them to make them work within the system, which is itself a good learning experience. Another good source for homework assignments is engineering graphics texts.

Read More Show Less

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 17, 2001

    ok book

    The book is good if you are a beginner. The only problem is that it explains the material in a story type format and does not get to the point immediately. By the way, I was taught I-deas by the author in my university.

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