Solid Modeling with Pro/ENGINEER(TM) / Edition 1

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Overview

FEATURES/BENEFITS

  • Each chapter includes a set of "Guided Tours" that walk users through features of Pro/ENGINEER.
    • Encourages the reader "to learn by doing."
  • Chapters conclude with an ample number of drawing problems.
  • Help reinforce topics from the chapter.

  • Solid Modeling with Pro/ENGINEER can be used on its own, or as a supplementary text to 3-D Visualization for Engineering Graphics, or any other Prentice Hall Graphics book.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780134901787
  • Publisher: Prentice Hall
  • Publication date: 3/15/2000
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 162
  • Product dimensions: 8.55 (w) x 10.97 (h) x 0.41 (d)

Read an Excerpt

PREFACE:

Preface

The intent of this text is to teach the reader about constraint-based solid modeling by focusing on the functionality and use of a single software package: Pro/ENGINEER. The text was written using Pro/ENGINEER Version 20; however, because its user interface is relatively stable, I believe that the book is more than adequate for use with Pro/ENGINEER 2000. There are subtle differences incorporated into the newer version of the software but most changes are relatively self-explanatory.

The first chapter is meant to be a general introduction to design in the context of computer tools and concurrent engineering. The second chapter explains the user interface and file management system for Pro/ENGINEER. Students do get opportunities in this chapter to "get their feet wet," by following the Guided Tours. Chapter 2 is also meant to serve as a resource. The third chapters covers the basics of two dimensional constraints. Once constraints are learned in 2-D they are more easily transferred to 3-D. The forth chapter applies the skills learned from Chapter 3 and extends them to three dimensions. In Chapter 4 you will find topics of extrusions, revolves, and helical sweeps. The fifth chapter, builds upon parts of Chapter 2, but within the context of being able to create intricate three dimensional objects. Chapter five goes into a mode advance discussion on displaying 3-D parts, this includes perspective views. The sixth chapter discuss some strategies for construction of more complex three dimensional models. Again, this chapter builds upon the previous chapters. Chapter 7 introduces advance modeling techniques which include sweeps and blending of variouscross sectional geometry. The final chapter, Eight, covers the methods involved in turning your 3-D model into a working engineering drawing.

When I teach my course in engineering graphics, I usually tell the students two things on the first day of class. First, and foremost, I inform them that I will not be teaching them how to use the software. The only way that they can learn the software is by sitting in front of the computer and using the software. I will serve as their "tour guide" through the software. I can show them shortcuts and help them focus on certain techniques, but I cannot teach them how to use the software—they must do that by themselves. Second, I tell them that if they have previous experience with a 2-D drafting package, such as AutoCAD, they should check that knowledge at the door. I have seen many people struggle to learn Pro/ENGINEER because they try to force the software to act like a 2-D drafting package. I try to illustrate the difference between 2-D CAD and 3-D modeling by asking students to imagine the different approaches they would take if they were going to draw me a picture of a table versus if they were going to build me a table out of plywood, nails, a frame, and legs. Most students can easily see that drawing a picture of a table is inherently different than building the table itself. This text is not a "cook book." It is design for more discovery based learning.

The exercises in each chapter are meant to reinforce topics from the chapter; however, in many cases, exercises could be used interchangeably between chapters. In the course where I use Pro/ENGINEER, I usually assign at lease half of all the problems at the end of each chapter. Another good source for homework assignments is engineering graphics texts.

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Table of Contents

1. Engineering Design.
2. User Interface and File Management in Pro/ENGINEER Software.
3. Two-Dimensional Constraints.
4. Creating 3-D Parts from 2-D Geometry.
5. Displaying 3-D Objects.
6. Construction Techniques.
7. Advanced Modeling Techniques.
8. Creating an Engineering Drawing.
Read More Show Less

Preface

PREFACE:

Preface

The intent of this text is to teach the reader about constraint-based solid modeling by focusing on the functionality and use of a single software package: Pro/ENGINEER. The text was written using Pro/ENGINEER Version 20; however, because its user interface is relatively stable, I believe that the book is more than adequate for use with Pro/ENGINEER 2000. There are subtle differences incorporated into the newer version of the software but most changes are relatively self-explanatory.

The first chapter is meant to be a general introduction to design in the context of computer tools and concurrent engineering. The second chapter explains the user interface and file management system for Pro/ENGINEER. Students do get opportunities in this chapter to "get their feet wet," by following the Guided Tours. Chapter 2 is also meant to serve as a resource. The third chapters covers the basics of two dimensional constraints. Once constraints are learned in 2-D they are more easily transferred to 3-D. The forth chapter applies the skills learned from Chapter 3 and extends them to three dimensions. In Chapter 4 you will find topics of extrusions, revolves, and helical sweeps. The fifth chapter, builds upon parts of Chapter 2, but within the context of being able to create intricate three dimensional objects. Chapter five goes into a mode advance discussion on displaying 3-D parts, this includes perspective views. The sixth chapter discuss some strategies for construction of more complex three dimensional models. Again, this chapter builds upon the previous chapters. Chapter 7 introduces advance modeling techniques which include sweeps and blending ofvariouscross sectional geometry. The final chapter, Eight, covers the methods involved in turning your 3-D model into a working engineering drawing.

When I teach my course in engineering graphics, I usually tell the students two things on the first day of class. First, and foremost, I inform them that I will not be teaching them how to use the software. The only way that they can learn the software is by sitting in front of the computer and using the software. I will serve as their "tour guide" through the software. I can show them shortcuts and help them focus on certain techniques, but I cannot teach them how to use the software—they must do that by themselves. Second, I tell them that if they have previous experience with a 2-D drafting package, such as AutoCAD, they should check that knowledge at the door. I have seen many people struggle to learn Pro/ENGINEER because they try to force the software to act like a 2-D drafting package. I try to illustrate the difference between 2-D CAD and 3-D modeling by asking students to imagine the different approaches they would take if they were going to draw me a picture of a table versus if they were going to build me a table out of plywood, nails, a frame, and legs. Most students can easily see that drawing a picture of a table is inherently different than building the table itself. This text is not a "cook book." It is design for more discovery based learning.

The exercises in each chapter are meant to reinforce topics from the chapter; however, in many cases, exercises could be used interchangeably between chapters. In the course where I use Pro/ENGINEER, I usually assign at lease half of all the problems at the end of each chapter. Another good source for homework assignments is engineering graphics texts.

Read More Show Less

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