Solid State Electronic Devices / Edition 6

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Overview

Solid State Electronic Devices is an introductory book on semiconductor materials, physics, devices, and technology. Now in its sixth edition, the book retains the two basic goals that have helped to make it so successful: 1) develop the basic semiconductor physics concepts to understand current and future devices and 2) provide a sound understanding of semiconductor devices and technology so that that their applications to electronic and optoelectronic circuits and systems can be appreciated.
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Editorial Reviews

Booknews
New edition of a widely used introductory textbook which provides readers with an understanding of existing devices and develops the tools for understanding future devices and applications. Coverage includes the basics of semiconductor materials and conduction processes in solids required to understand p-n junctions, transistors, and other devices, and definition of terms and concepts as they relate to a broad range of devices. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780131497269
  • Publisher: Prentice Hall
  • Publication date: 7/28/2005
  • Series: Prentice Hall Series in Solid State Phys
  • Edition description: REV
  • Edition number: 6
  • Pages: 608
  • Sales rank: 1,045,581
  • Product dimensions: 7.10 (w) x 9.40 (h) x 1.50 (d)

Meet the Author

Ben G. Streetman is Dean Emeritus of the College of Engineering at The University of Texas at Austin. He is an Emeritus Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering, where he held the Dula D. Cockrell Centennial Chair. He was the founding Director of the Microelectronics Research Center (1984—96). His teaching and research interests involve semiconductor materials and devices. After receiving a Ph.D. from The University of Texas at Austin (1966) he was on the faculty (1966–1982) of the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. He returned to The University of Texas at Austin in 1982. His honors include the Education Medal of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE), the Frederick Emmons Terman Medal of the American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE), and the Heinrich Welker Medal from the International Conference on Compound Semiconductors. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He is a Fellow of the IEEE and the Electrochemical Society. He has been honored as a Distinguished Alumnus of The University of Texas at Austin and as a Distinguished Graduate of the UT College of Engineering. He has received the General Dynamics Award for Excellence in Engineering Teaching, and was honored by the Parents’ Association as a Teaching Fellow for outstanding teaching of undergraduates. He has served on numerous panels and committees in industry and government, and several corporate boards. He has published more than 290 articles in the technical literature. Thirty five students of Electrical and Computer Engineering have received their Ph.D. under his supervision.

Sanjay Kumar Banerjee is the Cockrell Chair Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering, and Director of the Microelectronics Research Center at The University of Texas at Austin. He has more than 900 archival refereed publications and conference papers, 30 U.S. patents, and has supervised 50 Ph.D. students. His honors include the NSF Presidential Young Investigator Award (1988), ECS Callinan Award (2003) and IEEE Grove Award (2014). He is a Fellow of IEEE, APS and AAAS.

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Read an Excerpt

PREFACE:

Preface

This book is an introduction to semiconductor devices for undergraduate electrical engineers, other interested students, and practicing engineers and scientists whose understanding of modern electronics needs updating. The book is organized to bring students with a background in sophomore physics to a level of understanding which will allow them to read much of the current literature on new devices and applications.

Goals

An undergraduate course in electronic devices has two basic purposes: (1) to provide students with a sound understanding of existing devices, so that their studies of electronic circuits and systems will be meaningful; and (2) to develop the basic tools with which they can later learn about newly developed devices and applications. Perhaps the second of these objectives is the more important in the long run; it is clear that engineers and scientists who deal with electronics will continually be called upon to learn about new devices and processes in the future. For this reason, we have tried to incorporate the basics of semiconductor materials and conduction processes in solids, which arise repeatedly in the literature when new devices are explained. Some of these concepts are often omitted in introductory courses, with the view that they are unnecessary for understanding the fundamentals of junctions and transistors. We believe this view neglects the important goal of equipping students for the task of understanding a new device by reading the current literature. Therefore, in this text most of the commonly used semiconductor terms and concepts are introduced and related to a broad range of devices.

Reading Lists

As a further aid in developing techniques for independent study, the reading list at the end of each chapter includes a few articles which students can read comfortably as they study this book. Some of these articles have been selected from periodicals such as Scientific American and Physics Today, which specialize in introductory presentations. Other articles chosen from books and the professional literature provide a more quantitative treatment of the material. We do not expect that students will read all articles recommended in the reading lists; nevertheless, some exposure to periodicals is useful in laying the foundation for a career of constant updating and self-education.

Problems

One of the keys to success in understanding this material is to work problems that exercise the concepts. The problems at the end of each chapter are designed to facilitate learning the material. Very few are simple "plug-in" problems. Instead, they are chosen to reinforce or extend the material presented in the chapter.

Units

In keeping with the goals described above, examples and problems are stated in terms of units commonly used in the semiconductor literature. The basic system of units is rationalized MKS, although cm is often used as a convenient unit of length. Similarly, electron volts (eV) are often used rather than joules (J) to measure the energy of electrons. Units for various quantities are given in Appendices I and II.

Presentation

In presenting this material at the undergraduate level, one must anticipate a few instances which call for a phrase such as "It can be shown. . ." This is always disappointing; on the other hand, the alternative is to delay study of solid state devices until the graduate level, where statistical mechanics, quantum theory, and other advanced background can be freely invoked. Such a delay would result in a more elegant treatment of certain subjects, but it would prevent undergraduate students from enjoying the study of some very exciting devices.

The discussion includes both silicon and compound semiconductors, to reflect the continuing growth in importance for compounds in optoelectronic and high-speed device applications. Topics such as heterojunctions, lattice matching using ternary and quaternary alloys, variation of band gap with alloy composition, and properties of quantum wells add up to the breadth of the discussion. Not to be outdone by the compounds, silicon-based devices have continued their dramatic record of advancement. The discussion of FET structures and Si integrated circuits reflects these advancements. Our objective is not to cover all the latest devices, which can only be done in the journal and conference literature. Instead, we have chosen devices to discuss which are broadly illustrative of important principles.

The first four chapters of the book provide background on the nature of semiconductors and conduction processes in solids. Included is a brief introduction to quantum concepts (Chapter 2) for those students who do not already have this background from other courses. Chapter 5 describes the p-n junction and some of its applications. Chapters 6 and 7 deal with the principles of transistor operation. Chapter 8 covers optoelectronics and Chapter 9 discusses integrated circuits. Chapters 10 and 11 apply the theory of junctions and conduction processes to microwave and power devices. All of the devices covered are important in today's electronics; furthermore, learning about these devices should be an enjoyable and rewarding experience. We hope this book provides that kind of experience for its readers.

Acknowledgements

The fifth edition benefits greatly from comments and suggestions provided by students and teachers of the first four editions. The book's readers have generously provided comments which have been invaluable in developing the present version. We remain indebted to those persons mentioned in the Preface of the first four editions, who contributed so much to the development of the book. In particular, Nick Holonyak has been a source of continuing information and inspiration for all five editions. Additional thanks go to our colleagues at UT-Austin who have provided special assistance, particularly Joe Campbell, Ray Chen, Dennis Deppe, Russ Dupuis, Archie Holmes, Dim-Lee Kwong, Jack Lee, Christine Maziar, Dean Neikirk, and Al Tasch. Kay Shores and Qingyou Lu provided useful assistance with the typing. We thank the many companies and organizations cited in the figure captions for generously providing photographs and illustrations of devices and fabrication processes. Kobi Benzvi and Pradipto Mukherjee at Motorola, Shubneesh Batra and Mary Miller at Micron, and Tom Way at IBM deserve special mention. Finally, we recall with gratitude many years of association with the late Greg Stillman, a valued colleague and friend.

Ben G. Streetman
Sanjay Banerjee
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Table of Contents

1 Crystal properties and growth of semiconductors 1
2 Atoms and electrons 31
3 Energy bands and charge carriers in semiconductors 61
4 Excess carriers in semiconductors 118
5 Junctions 154
6 Field-effect transistors 251
7 Bipolar junction transistors 336
8 Optoelectronic devices 398
9 Integrated circuits 437
10 High-frequency and high-power devices 508
App Physical constants and conversion factors
App Properties of semiconductor materials
App Derivation of the density of states in the conduction band
App Derivation of Fermi-Dirac statistics
App Dry and wet thermal oxide thickness grown on Si (100) as a function of time and temperature
App Solid solubilities of impurities in Si
App Diffusivities of dopants in Si and SiO[subscript 2]
App Projected range and straggle as function of implant energy in Si
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Preface

Preface

This book is an introduction to semiconductor devices for undergraduate electrical engineers, other interested students, and practicing engineers and scientists whose understanding of modern electronics needs updating. The book is organized to bring students with a background in sophomore physics to a level of understanding which will allow them to read much of the current literature on new devices and applications.

Goals

An undergraduate course in electronic devices has two basic purposes: (1) to provide students with a sound understanding of existing devices, so that their studies of electronic circuits and systems will be meaningful; and (2) to develop the basic tools with which they can later learn about newly developed devices and applications. Perhaps the second of these objectives is the more important in the long run; it is clear that engineers and scientists who deal with electronics will continually be called upon to learn about new devices and processes in the future. For this reason, we have tried to incorporate the basics of semiconductor materials and conduction processes in solids, which arise repeatedly in the literature when new devices are explained. Some of these concepts are often omitted in introductory courses, with the view that they are unnecessary for understanding the fundamentals of junctions and transistors. We believe this view neglects the important goal of equipping students for the task of understanding a new device by reading the current literature. Therefore, in this text most of the commonly used semiconductor terms and concepts are introduced and related to a broad range of devices.

Reading Lists

As a further aidin developing techniques for independent study, the reading list at the end of each chapter includes a few articles which students can read comfortably as they study this book. Some of these articles have been selected from periodicals such as Scientific American and Physics Today, which specialize in introductory presentations. Other articles chosen from books and the professional literature provide a more quantitative treatment of the material. We do not expect that students will read all articles recommended in the reading lists; nevertheless, some exposure to periodicals is useful in laying the foundation for a career of constant updating and self-education.

Problems

One of the keys to success in understanding this material is to work problems that exercise the concepts. The problems at the end of each chapter are designed to facilitate learning the material. Very few are simple "plug-in" problems. Instead, they are chosen to reinforce or extend the material presented in the chapter.

Units

In keeping with the goals described above, examples and problems are stated in terms of units commonly used in the semiconductor literature. The basic system of units is rationalized MKS, although cm is often used as a convenient unit of length. Similarly, electron volts (eV) are often used rather than joules (J) to measure the energy of electrons. Units for various quantities are given in Appendices I and II.

Presentation

In presenting this material at the undergraduate level, one must anticipate a few instances which call for a phrase such as "It can be shown. . ." This is always disappointing; on the other hand, the alternative is to delay study of solid state devices until the graduate level, where statistical mechanics, quantum theory, and other advanced background can be freely invoked. Such a delay would result in a more elegant treatment of certain subjects, but it would prevent undergraduate students from enjoying the study of some very exciting devices.

The discussion includes both silicon and compound semiconductors, to reflect the continuing growth in importance for compounds in optoelectronic and high-speed device applications. Topics such as heterojunctions, lattice matching using ternary and quaternary alloys, variation of band gap with alloy composition, and properties of quantum wells add up to the breadth of the discussion. Not to be outdone by the compounds, silicon-based devices have continued their dramatic record of advancement. The discussion of FET structures and Si integrated circuits reflects these advancements. Our objective is not to cover all the latest devices, which can only be done in the journal and conference literature. Instead, we have chosen devices to discuss which are broadly illustrative of important principles.

The first four chapters of the book provide background on the nature of semiconductors and conduction processes in solids. Included is a brief introduction to quantum concepts (Chapter 2) for those students who do not already have this background from other courses. Chapter 5 describes the p-n junction and some of its applications. Chapters 6 and 7 deal with the principles of transistor operation. Chapter 8 covers optoelectronics and Chapter 9 discusses integrated circuits. Chapters 10 and 11 apply the theory of junctions and conduction processes to microwave and power devices. All of the devices covered are important in today's electronics; furthermore, learning about these devices should be an enjoyable and rewarding experience. We hope this book provides that kind of experience for its readers.

Acknowledgements

The fifth edition benefits greatly from comments and suggestions provided by students and teachers of the first four editions. The book's readers have generously provided comments which have been invaluable in developing the present version. We remain indebted to those persons mentioned in the Preface of the first four editions, who contributed so much to the development of the book. In particular, Nick Holonyak has been a source of continuing information and inspiration for all five editions. Additional thanks go to our colleagues at UT-Austin who have provided special assistance, particularly Joe Campbell, Ray Chen, Dennis Deppe, Russ Dupuis, Archie Holmes, Dim-Lee Kwong, Jack Lee, Christine Maziar, Dean Neikirk, and Al Tasch. Kay Shores and Qingyou Lu provided useful assistance with the typing. We thank the many companies and organizations cited in the figure captions for generously providing photographs and illustrations of devices and fabrication processes. Kobi Benzvi and Pradipto Mukherjee at Motorola, Shubneesh Batra and Mary Miller at Micron, and Tom Way at IBM deserve special mention. Finally, we recall with gratitude many years of association with the late Greg Stillman, a valued colleague and friend.

Ben G. Streetman
Sanjay Banerjee
Read More Show Less

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