Solitary (Solitary Tales Series #1) [NOOK Book]

Overview

His Loneliness Will Soon Turn to Fear…. When Chris Buckley moves to Solitary, North Carolina, he faces the reality of his parents’ divorce, a school full of nameless faces—and Jocelyn Evans. Jocelyn is beautiful and mysterious enough to leave Chris speechless. But the more Jocelyn resists him, the more the two are drawn together. Chris soon learns that Jocelyn has secrets as deep as the town itself. Secrets more terrifying than the bullies he faces in the locker room or his mother’s unexplained ...

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Solitary (Solitary Tales Series #1)

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Overview

His Loneliness Will Soon Turn to Fear…. When Chris Buckley moves to Solitary, North Carolina, he faces the reality of his parents’ divorce, a school full of nameless faces—and Jocelyn Evans. Jocelyn is beautiful and mysterious enough to leave Chris speechless. But the more Jocelyn resists him, the more the two are drawn together. Chris soon learns that Jocelyn has secrets as deep as the town itself. Secrets more terrifying than the bullies he faces in the locker room or his mother’s unexplained nightmares. He slowly begins to understand the horrific answers. The question is whether he can save Jocelyn in time. This first book in the Solitary Tales series will take you from the cold halls of high school to the dark rooms of an abandoned cabin—and remind you what it means to believe in what you cannot see.

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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

"The first in the Solitary Tales series draws listeners into the frightening story of Chris Buckley, a troubled youth from a broken family who has just moved into a town full of secrets. There he meets beautiful Jocelyn Evans, whose life is also full of mysteries. Narrator Kirby Heyborne brings this Christian thriller to life with an emotional detachment that contrasts with nightmarish story. His even-toned voice forces the listener's involvement and provides a thrilling experience. Don't listen in the dark." 
J.E. © AudioFile Portland, Maine
School Library Journal
Gr 8 Up—After Chris's parents' divorce, he and his mother move back to her childhood hometown of Solitary, North Carolina. School bullies, a beautiful girl named Jocelyn, and being the new kid make up his new school experience. Chris's new home is located a distance from the town and, without a driver's license, he must depend on his mother or his bicycle for transportation. Due to financial circumstances, he has no Internet connection or cell phone. His mother is drinking heavily and spends most of her time grieving the loss of her marriage. All of these circumstances result in Chris's solitary existence. He wanders the surrounding woods and stumbles into an old cabin with a trap door that leads to a mysterious room underneath. The attraction between Chris and Jocelyn is the only bright spot in his life. Jocelyn is a loner and, as they get to know each other, he learns that she has many secrets. As she reveals them to him, life becomes more complicated and dangerous for them. Solitary is a place that neither welcomes strangers nor tolerates questions. Kirby Heyborne authentically voices the young adult characters in Travis Thrasher's novel (David C. Cook, 2010). Although this is a compelling listen, even with foreshadowing, the abrupt and traumatic ending is shocking. Listeners may find this a less than satisfying conclusion to the first book in the series.—Jeana Actkinson, Educational Service Center Region XI, Ft. Worth, TX
Kirkus Reviews
A 16-year-old confronts evil in a North Carolina town. Chris Buckley and his mother, Tara, leave Chicago and his born-again dad, who found God but abandoned the family. They return to Tara's hometown of Solitary, N.C., and move into an isolated cabin in the woods, the former residence of Tara's brother, Robert, who's now missing. After defending fellow student Newt at Harrington County High, Chris tops the hit list of violent bully Gus Staunch, whose father owns half the town. Chris is repeatedly warned to stay off the radar and lie low--not an easy task, since things are seriously off-kilter in Solitary. An eerie man and his dog guard the town, which, oddly enough, is deserted at midday on Saturdays. Crazy Aunt Alice, with her live-in crow and mannequin "friend," is less than hospitable to Tara and Chris. Then there's creepy Pastor Marsh, whose sermons are on the dark side. Chris is also forced to look after his tippling mother, who'd rather go unconscious than face life. Chris enjoys his friendship with a trio of girls--kind Rachel, goth Poe and lovely Jocelyn, who catches Chris' eye. As Chris falls for Jocelyn, he's torn between staying out of harm's way and finding the truth about Uncle Robert and other residents who've disappeared. In the first of four books in the Solitary Tales series, Thrasher deftly captures the essence of high school: "Nameless, faceless ghouls strolling by listening to iPods with blank stares." Chris' mounting terror of the unknown effectively intertwines with his panic at being the new kid at school. In addition to typical teen traumas of bad cafeteria food, locker mishaps and relationship anxieties, he's caught in a spiritual struggle of dynamic proportions. Although he doesn't believe in God, the malice surrounding him may eventually require help from on high. Chris and Jocelyn's on-again, off-again relationship is intensified by the menace they both face. An occasional comic scene breaks the tension, as when Chris and Tara reflect on just how "dysfunctional" Aunt Alice is. Due to financial constraints, Chris doesn't have a cellphone or car; he commutes primarily by bike. For much of the book, he has no Internet access, either, and hence no Facebook, which enhances the claustrophobia. Though pegged as suitable for teens and tweens, this one's no more "young adult" than The Hunger Games, the Harry Potter books or the Twilight series. But instead of hype and hoopla, Thrasher generates authentic suspense and the feeling that something wicked this way comes. Superior entry in the genre of Christian horror and teenage angst.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781434702524
  • Publisher: Cook, David C.
  • Publication date: 8/1/2010
  • Series: Solitary Tales Series , #1
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 400
  • Sales rank: 573,365
  • File size: 442 KB

Meet the Author

Travis Thrasher

The author of a dozen works of fiction, including Isolation and Ghostwriter, Travis Thrasher has been writing since he was in the third grade. His writing is known for its honesty, depth, and surprising twists. Thrasher lives with his wife and daughter near Chicago.

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Read an Excerpt

SOLITARY

A NOVEL


By TRAVIS THRASHER

David C. Cook

Copyright © 2010 Travis Thrasher
All rights reserved.
ISBN: 978-1-4347-0252-4



CHAPTER 1

Half a Person


She's beautiful.

She stands behind two other girls, one a goth coated in black and the other a blonde with wild hair and an even wilder smile. She's waiting, looking off the other way, but I've already memorized her face.

I've never seen such a gorgeous girl in my life.

"You really like them?"

The goth girl is the one talking; maybe she's the leader of their pack. I've noticed them twice already today because of her, the one standing behind. The beautiful girl from my second-period English class, the one with the short skirt and long legs and endless brown hair, the one I can't stop thinking about. She's hard not to notice.

"Yeah, they're one of my favorites," I say.

We're talking about my T-shirt. It's my first day at this school, and I'd be lying if I said I didn't think carefully about what I was going to wear. It's about making a statement. I would have bet that 99 percent of the seven hundred kids at this high school wouldn't know what Strangeways, Here We Come refers to.

Guess I found the other 1 percent.

I was killing time after lunch by wandering aimlessly when the threesome stopped me. Goth Girl didn't even say hi; she just pointed at the murky photograph of a face on my shirt and asked where I got it. She made it sound like I stole it.

In a way, I did.

"You're not from around here, are you?" Goth Girl asks. Her sparkling blue eyes are almost hidden by her dark eyeliner.

"Did the shirt give it away?"

"Nobody in this school listens to The Smiths."

I can tell her that I stole the shirt, or in a sense borrowed it, but then she'd ask me from where.

I don't want to tell her I found it in a drawer in the house we're staying at. A cabin that belongs to my uncle. A cabin that used to belong to my uncle when he was around.

"I just moved here from a suburb of Chicago."

"What suburb?" the blonde asks.

"Libertyville. Ever hear of it?"

"No."

I see the beauty shift her gaze around to see who's watching. Which is surprising, because most attractive girls don't have to do that. They know that they're being watched.

This is different. Her glance is more suspicious. Or anxious.

"What's your name?"

"Chris Buckley."

"Good taste in music, Chris," Goth Girl says. "I'm Poe. This is Rachel. And she's Jocelyn."

That's right. Her name's Jocelyn. I remember now from class.

"What else do you like?"

"I got a wide taste in music."

"Do you like country?" Poe asks.

"No, not really."

"Good. I can't stand it. Nobody who wears a T-shirt like that would ever like country."

"I like country," Rachel says.

"Don't admit it. So why'd you move here?"

"Parents got a divorce. My mom decided to move, and I came with her."

"Did you have a choice?"

"Not really. But if I had I would've chosen to move with her."

"Why here?"

"Some of our family lives in Solitary. Or used to. I have a couple relatives in the area." I choose not to say anything about Uncle Robert. "My mother grew up around here."

"That sucks," Poe says.

"Solitary is a strange town," Rachel says with a grin that doesn't seem to ever go away. "Anybody tell you that?"

I shake my head.

"Joss lives here; we don't," Poe says. "I'm in Groveton; Rach lives on the border to South Carolina. Joss tries to hide out at our places because Solitary fits its name."

Jocelyn looks like she's late for something, her body language screaming that she wants to leave this conversation she's not a part of. She still hasn't acknowledged me.

"What year are you guys?"

"Juniors. I'm from New York—can't you tell? Rachel is from Colorado, and Jocelyn grew up here, though she wants to get out as soon as she can. You can join our club if you like."

Part of me wonders if I'd have to wear eyeliner and lipstick.

"Club?"

"The misfits. The outcasts. Whatever you want to call it."

"Not sure if I want to join that."

"You think you fit in?"

"No," I say.

"Good. We'll take you. You fit with us. Plus ... you're cute."

Poe and her friends walk away.

Jocelyn finally glances at me and smiles the saddest smile I've ever seen.


I'd be lying if I said I wasn't terrified.

I might look cool and nonchalant and act cool and nonchalant, but inside I'm quaking.

I spent the first sixteen years of my life around the same people, going to the same school, living in the same town with the same two parents.

Now everything is different.

The students who pass me are nameless, faceless, expressionless. We are part of a herd that jumps to life like Pavlov's dog at the sound of the bell, which really is a low drone that sounds like it comes from some really bad sci-fi movie. It's hard to keep the cool and nonchalant thing going while staring in confusion at my school map. I probably look pathetic.

I dig out the computer printout of my class list and look at it again. I swear there's not a room called C305.

I must be looking pathetic, because she comes up to me and asks if I'm lost.

Jocelyn can actually talk.

"Yeah, kinda."

"Where are you going?"

"Some room—C305. Does that even exist?"

"Of course it does. I'm actually heading there right now." There's an attitude in her voice, as if she's ready for a fight even if one's not coming.

"History?"

She nods.

"Second class together," I say, which elicits a polite and slightly annoyed smile.

She explains to me how the rooms are organized, with C stuck between A and B for some crazy reason. But I don't really hear the words she's saying. I look at her and wonder if she can see me blushing. Other kids are staring at me now for the first time today. They look at Jocelyn and look at me—curious, critical, cutting. I wonder if I'm imagining it.

After a minute of this, I stare off a kid who looks like I threw manure in his face.

"Not the friendliest bunch of people, are they?" I ask.

"People here don't like outsiders."

"They didn't even notice me until now."

She nods and looks away, as if this is her fault. Her hair, so thick and straight, shimmers all the way past her shoulders. I could stare at her all day long.

"Glad you're in some of my classes."

"I'm sure you are," she says.

We reach the room.

"Well, thanks."

"No problem."

She says it the way an upperclassmen might answer a freshman. Or an older sister her bratty brother. I want to say something witty, but nothing comes to mind.

I'm sure I'm not the first guy she's left speechless.

Every class I'm introduced to seems more and more unimpressed.

"This is Christopher Buckley from Chicago, Illinois," the teachers say, in case anybody doesn't know where Chicago is.

In case anybody wonders who the new breathing slab of human is, stuck in the middle of the room.

A redheaded girl with a giant nose stares at me, then glances at my shirt as if I have food smeared all over it. She rolls her eyes and then looks away.

Glancing down at my shirt makes me think of a song by The Smiths, "Half a Person."

That's how I feel.

I've never been the most popular kid in school. I'm a soccer player in a football world. My parents never had an abundance of money. I'm not overly good looking or overly smart or overly anything, to be honest. Just decent looking and decent at sports and decent at school. But decent doesn't get you far. Most of the time you need to be the best at one thing and stick to it.

I think about this as I notice more unfamiliar faces. A kid who looks like he hasn't bathed for a week. An oily-faced girl who looks miserable. A guy with tattoos who isn't even pretending to listen.

I never really fit in back in Libertyville, so how in the world am I going to fit in here?

Two more years of high school.

I don't want to think about it.

As the teacher drones on about American history and I reflect on my own history, my eyes find her.

I see her glancing my way.

For a long moment, neither of us look away.

For that long moment, it's just the two of us in the room.

Her glance is strong and tough. It's almost as if she's telling me to remain the same, as if she's saying, Don't let them get you down.

Suddenly, I have this amazingly crazy thought: I'm glad I'm here.


I have to fight to get out of the room to catch up to Jocelyn.

I've had forty minutes to think of exactly what I want to say, but by the time I catch up to her, all that comes out is "hey."

She nods.

Those eyes cripple me. I'm not trying to sound cheesy—they do. They bind my tongue.

For an awkward sixty seconds, the longest minute of my sixteen years, I walk the hallway beside her. We reach the girls' room, and she opens the door and goes inside. I stand there for a second, wondering if I should wait for her, then feeling stupid and ridiculous, wondering why I'm turning into a head of lettuce around a stranger I just met.

But I know exactly why.

As I head down the hallway, toward some other room with some other teacher unveiling some other plan to educate us, I feel someone grab my arm.

"You don't want to mess with that."

I wonder if I heard him right. Did he say that or her?

I turn and see a short kid with messy brown hair and a pimply face. I gotta be honest—it's been a while since I'd seen a kid with this many pimples. Doctors have things you can do for that. The word pus comes to mind.

"Mess with what?"

"Jocelyn. If I were you, I wouldn't entertain such thoughts."

Who is this kid, and what's he talking about?

And what teenager says, "I wouldn't entertain such thoughts"?

"What thoughts would those be?"

"Don't be a wise guy."

Pimple Boy sounds like the wise guy, with a weaselly voice that seems like it's going to deliver a punch line any second.

"What are you talking about?"

"Look, I'm just warning you. I've seen it happen before. I'm nobody, okay, and nobodies can get away with some things. And you look like a decent guy, so I'm just telling you."

"Telling me what?"

"Not to take a fancy with the lady."

Did he just say that in an accent that sounded British, or is it my imagination?

"I was just walking with her down the hallway."

"Yeah. Okay. Then I'll see you later."

"Wait. Hold on," I say. "Is she taken or something?"

"Yeah. She's spoken for. And has been for some time."

Pimple Boy says this the way he might tell me that my mother is dying.

It's bizarre.

And a bit spooky.

I realize that Harrington County High in Solitary, North Carolina, is a long way away from Libertyville.

I think about what the odd kid just told me.

This is probably bad.

Because one thing in my life has been a constant. You can ask my mother or father, and they'd agree.

I don't like being told what to do.

CHAPTER 2

Milk at Midnight


The scream is loud and low and scares me right out of bed.

I fumble in the darkness, trying to remember where I am, why it's so cold, and why the ceiling is slanted and hitting my head as I stand.

I can see the cold moonlight reflecting off trees that wave to me through the window.

Another scream comes, and this time I wonder if it's Mom. Yet it doesn't sound like her.

It doesn't sound human.

I race out the door and down the stairs and hear another scream, and this time I know it's Mom.

The light in her bedroom blinds me. I find her in the corner of the room, shaking, her hands waving at something in the air, her eyes glaring.

She sees me and screams again.

I've never heard a bloodcurdling scream before in my life, but now I know where they got the name.

I hold her in my arms.

"Mom. It's me. Mom. It's Chris. Mom."

I say this over and over again as I hold her. It feels strange, I think, that this person so much shorter and smaller than me is my mother.

Eventually she calms down. Then starts to cry.

"I'm sorry."

"It's okay."

We sit at the small breakfast-dinner table. She's drinking a glass of milk.

"I hope I didn't scare you," Mom says.

"It takes a lot to scare me."

She knows this is true.

"What were you dreaming about?" I ask.

"The thing is ... I don't ... I didn't feel like I was dreaming. I know I was. It's just ... it felt so real."

"What?"

Mom looks at me, then shakes her head.

"I don't know. It's nothing."

But the look on her pale face says something else. Maybe she's not lying. Maybe she just doesn't want to say because she thinks it might scare me.

Or make me scared about her sanity.


My mom's not crazy. In fact, she's the sanest person I've met in this insane world.

My dad's the crazy one. Crazy for not loving her, crazy for leaving her, crazy for letting the divorce happen.

I don't want to talk about him or them. I want to talk about her.

Tara Buckley is a cool name if you ask me. I like Chris, but I love Tara. It sounds both classic Southern and also modern and hip. Buckley is my dad's last name, but Mom is going to keep it. She lost enough in the divorce. She decided she'd stick with the name she'd carried around for eighteen years.

Mom is thirty-nine but looks ten years younger. If I had a dollar for every time someone has expressed disbelief that she is my mom ... well, I'd be a rich kid. Which at this point in life would be nice. I think she's beautiful.

She used to complain about her upcoming birthday—the big four-oh—until she had other, more pressing things to think about. Sitting across the table from her, I see dark lines under her eyes. They're new. So is the lack of spark in her green eyes. And how thin she looks. And how faded her blonde hair seems.

I notice all these things now under the cold light above our little table. The first thing that I'd like to replace about this tiny little cabin are the lights. They seem like they'd be more appropriate in a dank prison than in a cabin nestled in the mountains of North Carolina.

The cabin is small. It doesn't have the dining room over here and the family room over there and all that. Basically, when you enter the cabin, you have the living room and dining room and kitchen all to one side. It's small. Cozy, my mother said. It had been large enough for Uncle Robert, but it was never meant to be a place a family lived in.

But it was the first, and only, place she thought of going after the divorce was final.

Mom grew up around Solitary, though she says she doesn't really remember it much as a kid. I wonder why she would want to come back to a place this remote, especially if she doesn't remember much about it. But she said that it's the only place where she still has family.

If you can really call them that.

The only real family member is Robert, and he's been missing for over a year. Sometimes I think she came back to find her brother and take him away from Solitary. Then again, I think a lot of things.

My mom is strong. At least, so far she's been strong. I know that deep down, underneath it all, she's sad. But sadness gets you nowhere in life. I think she would say that if forced to.

Sitting across from my mom, the lady known as Tara Buckley who has come to live in a cabin her brother abandoned for some unknown reason, I wonder if there will be more nightmares.

And I wonder what sort of visions brought out the screams.


(Continues...)

Excerpted from SOLITARY by TRAVIS THRASHER. Copyright © 2010 Travis Thrasher. Excerpted by permission of David C. Cook.
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

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Table of Contents

Contents

Preface,
1. Half a Person,
2. Milk at Midnight,
3. Newt,
4. Solitary,
5. The Woods,
6. Sinister and Creepy,
7. So Not Right,
8. The Gate,
9. Four of Them,
10. Freaking Out,
11. Escaping,
12. I Dare You,
13. Making Trouble,
14. Chance,
15. Aunt Alice,
16. This Life,
17. Girls,
18. Friday Morning,
19. A Little Lost,
20. The Stone Wall,
21. Slivers of White,
22. The Beast,
23. Closed,
24. Corny and Cute,
25. I Have Nothing,
26. The Curiosity Factor,
27. Ray,
28. Wounded and Wrecked,
29. Someone, Somewhere in Summertime,
30. More Surprises,
31. Lunch Buddy,
32. Things Can Only Get Better,
33. Playlist for a Loser,
34. All the Puzzle Pieces,
35. Church,
36. Confusion,
37. Changing like the Moon,
38. Help and Guidance,
39. Questions,
40. Twenty-Five Percent Change,
41. Skirmish,
42. Before Leaving,
43. Magic,
44. The Gift,
45. Trust,
46. Downstream,
47. What Fate Brings to Your Doorstep,
48. The Discovery,
49. Sliding and Falling,
50. The Email,
51. MIA,
52. At Night,
53. Emails,
54. Crazy Ideas,
55. The Prayer,
56. Echoes,
57. Plans,
58. Creepy,
59. First Impressions,
60. Alone,
61. Blackout,
62. A New Sensation,
63. Random and Profound,
64. The Burial Ground,
65. Anger and Goose Bumps,
66. Pieces of the Puzzle,
67. Messages and Plans,
68. Newt Knows,
69. Investigating,
70. The Threat,
71. Whispers in the Dark,
72. What Difference Does It Make?,
73. Running,
74. Eyes in the Woods,
75. Theft, and Wandering Around Lost,
76. Secret Meeting,
77. The Surprise,
78. Midnight,
79. Hiding in the Darkness,
80. The Voice That Needs,
81. Capable,
82. The Right Thing,
83. Strangers Who Watch,
84. Dangerous People,
85. Nervous Laughter,
86. Breath of Heaven,
87. December 26,
88. December 27,
89. December 28,
90. Lovesick,
91. Not a Clue,
92. The Movie Star,
93. Swallowed Whole,
94. The Reminder,
95. Stronger than the Night,
96. Finality,
97. ...,
98. My Private Place,
99. Hold On,
AfterWords,
Three Recommended Playlists,
Behind the Book: Some Kind Of Wonderful,
A Snapshot,

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 3.5
( 50 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(14)

4 Star

(18)

3 Star

(10)

2 Star

(3)

1 Star

(5)

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 50 Customer Reviews
  • Posted January 26, 2012

    Genius!

    Chris Buckley moves to Solitary, North Carolina from the Chicago suburbs as a result of his parents' divorce. Once in Solitary they are all on their own, and Solitary isn't the friendliest of places.

    Then a girl named Jocelyn crosses his path, and he instantly becomes addicted to her. Her mysterious ways entice him and his life goal becomes that he must learn more about her.

    As Chris beings to learn more about Solitary he learns of unexplained deaths, missing kids, and beyond strange nightmares. He knows something seriously wrong is going on in the town of Solitary, but no matter what he won't let anything happen to Jocelyn.

    Ok, I found this a very good read, if you like Twilight you will defiantly enjoy this just as much or perhaps even better. Thrasher's writing style is genius, and from the first page he'd gotten me hooked. Though the paragraph breaks were extremely annoying at points.

    I found Chris' fascination with Jocelyn very interesting, and that's what got me hooked why I was still reading the Preface. I did notice that the book was extremely realistic. Between the relationship between Chris and Jocelyn and everything else going on it felt so real.

    The horror elements in the book were a bit scary, I had to set it down several times before I could continue reading because I was scared to see what was going to happen next.

    Though I did give it 4 stars for a reason and here it is: I felt a little cheated. Probably about halfway through the book, Solitary revealed itself to be Christian Fiction. Now I have no issue with Christianity or Christian Fiction, it's just the fact that there were no descriptions indicating that it was Christian Fiction is all.

    At 400 pages Solitary is a heavy read, but entirely worth it, of course if Christian Fiction is your thing. I'm definitely going to read the rest of the series.

    11 out of 11 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted June 17, 2011

    THIS IS A "STAR MINUS"-------Please, don't waste your time!!

    My daughter (age 19) recommended this book to me. We totally disagreed! She LOVED the writing, the mystery, and the imagination. I cannot believe I wasted my time on it. I love mysteries...when they are solved. There were way too many details unanswered. If you are going to read the book, do not read any further. I have so many unanswered questions...WHO was the wolf/ghost figure who bit Chris and why did Chris NEVER bring this up to anyone? Who was the man on the side of the road that glared at Chris? Who was the leader of the "clan" people? Why did they form? What brought them to evil? Were those three missing kids, sacrificed? Why did they kill Jocelyn? Why was Gus such a bully? Why was his father never introduced in the book. You'd think he would be after making such a big deal out of him. What happened to Chris' uncle and why did he disappear? Who was the man creeping around their cabin and leaving footprints? What was Ray trying to do? Why was the Pastor so creepy? What did the Pastor want from Chris? Who was emailing Chris? Why couldn't someone come out and tell Chris, "There is a devil worshipping cult (was there?); stay away from so-and-so." Why did Chris' mom have nightmares? What did the weird aunt have to do with ANYTHING!!!??? Of course, I could use my imagination or my reasoning and make up the solutions. However, I think that would be the author's responsibility. Is this more interesting to the younger generation?

    8 out of 12 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 20, 2012

    I am disapointed

    THERE ARE SPOILERS IN THIS REVIEW, IF YOU HATE LET DOWNS IN THE ENDS OF BOOKS READ THIS!!!







    Ok so I really liked this book in the beginning, but then at the end I was all excited because I wanted to see how Chris saved Jocelyn, but then the ending is soooooo disapointing! I hated the end and I was like really upset for a few days because I thought Chris would save Jocelyn, she was my FAVORITE and she got her freaking throt and wrists slit which killed her!!!!

    5 out of 8 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted July 9, 2011

    Chilling...in a great way!

    I won't waste your time giving a plot summary, but i am posting this to say you must read this book! Very few can communicate sheer suspense and terror the way that Travis Thrasher can while communicating it through such realistic and fully developed characters. I couldn't put this book down, and the twists and turns proved so shocking that i am dying to see what happens next. Since this is the first book in a series (seriously, how was that not obvious from the start?) I am excited to discover the answers that I am yearning for as the SOLITARY TALES continue to unfurl. Go ahead! Leave the porch lights on tonight. Double-check to ensure that all of your doors and windows are locked. Keep the Maglite flashlight/night stick nearby, and curl up to read this chilling tale!

    4 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 3, 2013

    A book for simpletons. Traumatized boy meets traumatized girl. M

    A book for simpletons. Traumatized boy meets traumatized girl. More trauma, then death. Continual posturing and repeated scenes abound. I gave up after the third breakup. The ending was a disappointment. Not going to continue with the series and glad that I could delete the free book from my tablet.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted January 30, 2013

    I am copying and pasting another reviewer's post because I could

    I am copying and pasting another reviewer's post because I could not have said it better: From Kellys_Mom: "I cannot believe I wasted my time on it. I love mysteries...when they are solved. There were way too many details unanswered. If you are going to read the book, do not read any further. I have so many unanswered questions...WHO was the wolf/ghost figure who bit Chris and why did Chris NEVER bring this up to anyone? Who was the man on the side of the road that glared at Chris? Who was the leader of the "clan" people? Why did they form? What brought them to evil? Were those three missing kids, sacrificed? Why did they kill Jocelyn? Why was Gus such a bully? Why was his father never introduced in the book. You'd think he would be after making such a big deal out of him. What happened to Chris' uncle and why did he disappear? Who was the man creeping around their cabin and leaving footprints? What was Ray trying to do? Why was the Pastor so creepy? What did the Pastor want from Chris? Who was emailing Chris? Why couldn't someone come out and tell Chris, "There is a devil worshipping cult (was there?); stay away from so-and-so." Why did Chris' mom have nightmares? What did the weird aunt have to do with ANYTHING!!!??? Of course, I could use my imagination or my reasoning and make up the solutions. However, I think that would be the author's responsibility. "

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 28, 2012

    Wow

    Didnt know this was from a guy's perspective... but it still sounds like a really good book ;)

    1 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted April 30, 2012

    Might be good for a book club

    An, okay read! The mystery was such a build up but the let down was very weak and disappointing.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 7, 2012

    Wow!!!!!

    Amazing book! Took me through all emotions and reminded me of the Hope I do have. Would recommend this for any teenagers possibly 8th grade and up. There is evil in this world but when we know where our Hope is we do not have to be afraid.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 24, 2014

    DONT LISTEN TO BAD REVIEWS

    They say too much left unanswered but it is a series. The storie is brilliantly writen and intereting. I love travis thrasher

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  • Posted August 26, 2013

    Another great Christian story from Travis Thrasher! I could not

    Another great Christian story from Travis Thrasher! I could not put this book down. It kept me on the edge of my seat through the whole story. It had a chilling ending. Incredibly spooky. I was anxious to continue Chris Buckley's story.

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  • Posted June 4, 2013

    more from this reviewer

    By: Travis Thrasher Published By: David C. Cook Age Recommende



    By: Travis Thrasher
    Published By: David C. Cook
    Age Recommended: Adult
    Reviewed 4
    Book Blog For: GMTA
    Series: Solitary Tales #4
    Review:

    "Hurt" By Travis Thrasher was another enjoyed series read that offered suspense, action. mystery and much love though it all and taking place in North Carolina. "Hurt" was of a teenage POV love story with many twist and turns really making it hard to put down until the very end. This story has a good plot and story line that is very interesting and believable. The characters are well developed and very captivating only keeping your attention through the read. This read could be considered a 'Christian fiction' and this author did a wonderful job as presenting the subject.


    If you are looking for a good Christian, mystery, thriller with suspense read you have come to the right place and I would recommend this read to any YA and adult.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 14, 2013

    This is horrer

    I thought it was to scary. If you like horrer then you will like this book. I did not like that they killed one of the main charecters. So if you fall in love with charecters easily then do not read.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 9, 2013

    Didn't know it was a series.

    When I bought the free book sometime ago, I didn't know it was a series. I was incredibly disappointed at the abrupt ending to an otherwise enjoyable book. Only after finishing did I find out there was ONE story over FOUR books. Now I either have to pay for the others or wait indefinitely until the library picks up the series. You have been warned!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 13, 2013

    when is a mystery no longer a good mystery?

    When you have no answers at the end of a book, it's disappointing. It's one thing to have answered some questions raised and bring up new ones to ponder at the end in continuing with a mystery atmosphere, it's another thing to never get answers for the main topics and only a smattering of answers to minor ones. I gave this a 3 instead of a 2 b/c I was hooked on it through the end and couldn't put it down because I wanted to find out the answers to all they mysteries but then when it ended the way it did, I got confused and felt cheated. I will probably eventually read the 2nd in the series to see if it answers the questions left untold in the 1st.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 11, 2013

    Something intersting

    It's a little scary but very interesting

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 5, 2012

    Great

    A bunch of people say its bad because there is not enough answers. But seriously come on. Why to u think it is a mystery. The book was great. Will definately read others books in the series. A must read.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 22, 2012

    Okay

    Not too bad. Something about it doesn't flow amazingly well, tho.

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  • Posted July 6, 2012

    I found Solitary to be extremely realistic. I thought that was a

    I found Solitary to be extremely realistic. I thought that was a great characteristic that the book offered. As I was reading it,I found it to be spooky. The spookiness made it more interesting. The book was definitely well written and easy to read.

    I felt disappoint whenever no one answered Chris' questions. Instead of getting responses he was being yelled at. I felt sympathetic toward Chris when he was not recieving any answers. Over this book was wonderful since, it combined romance, horror, and religion.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 1, 2012

    okay. Long. Confusing. Too many q's and suspense

    Alot of suspense and confusing drama. Toooo long of a pause between questions and answers.

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