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Solomon the Rusty Nail
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Solomon the Rusty Nail

5.0 3
by William Steig
 

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Solomon the bunny can turn himself into a rusty nail!

Overview

Solomon the bunny can turn himself into a rusty nail!

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Steig has created a story and pictures as richly inventive as his applauded Abel's Island, Yellow and Pink, The Amazing Bone and all his other picture books. Beautifully written and illustrated by paintings reflecting the sunny colors of spring, the adventures of Solomon the rabbit lad start when he discovers he can metamorphose into a rusty nail. It's a lark to fool his family by working the magic that makes him disappear, then saying the phrase that brings him back. But the fun stops when the cat Ambrose snatches Solomon and totes him home for Clorinda to cook. The rabbit turns into the nail, but Ambrose, who's on to the trick, tells his wife they'll wait until the captive is a plump bunny again, ready for the stewpot. When Solomon remains inertly iron too long, enraged Ambrose nails him to the house. What happens thereafter is exciting, comic, touching and altogether wonderful: a classic by a peerless artist. (All ages)
School Library Journal
PreS-Gr 2 Solomon is an ordinary rabbit with one extraordinary exception: whenever he scratches his nose and wiggles his toes at exactly the same time, he turns into a rusty nail. Incarcerated by a one-eyed cat, he is soon nailed to the wall in a fit of feline pique. As with other Steig heroes and heroines, a combination of pluck and luck lead him back to the bosom of his worried family. Steig's watercolors are, as always, uniquely expressive, ranging from wryly witty to luminescently lovely. However, there is more than a hint of d ej a vu to the story line: echoes of Sylvester and the Magic Pebble (Windmill, 1969) mix with overtones of The Amazing Bone (Farrar, 1976) conjuring up earlierand betterfantasies. In the process of pasting together elements from other fantasies, Steig has created a world leaking at its logical seams. If Solomon can ``still hear though he had no ears, and see though he had no eyes,'' why can he not also talk, though he has no mouth, and thus save himself at once? Furthermore, Solomon discovers his magical power while sitting on a green, flower-sprinkled lawn, then proceeds to mystify his friends, ``starting the next day,'' as they all frolic with sleds on a snow-covered hillside. Now really! Quibbles, perhaps, but ones that glare like errors in this less-than-masterful performance by a master storyteller. Kristi Thomas Beavin, Arlington County Library, Va.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781466808768
Publisher:
Farrar, Straus and Giroux
Publication date:
07/30/2013
Sold by:
Macmillan
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
32
File size:
12 MB
Note:
This product may take a few minutes to download.
Age Range:
4 - 8 Years

Meet the Author

William Steig (1907-2003) was a cartoonist, illustrator and author of award-winning books for children, including Shrek!, on which the DreamWorks movies are based. Steig was born in New York City. Every member of his family was involved in the arts, and so it was no surprise when he decided to become an artist. He attended City College and the National Academy of Design. In 1930, Steig's work began appearing in The New Yorker, where his drawings have been a popular fixture ever since. He published his first children's book, Roland the Minstrel Pig, in 1968.

In 1970, Steig received the Caldecott Medal for Sylvester and the Magic Pebble. His books for children also include Dominic; The Real Thief; The Amazing Bone, a Caldecott Honor Book; Amos&Boris, a National Book Award finalist; and Abel's Island and Doctor De Soto, both Newbery Honor Books. Steig's books have also received the Christopher Award, the Irma Simonton Black Award, the William Allen White Children's Book Award, and the American Book Award. His European awards include the Premio di Letteratura per l'infanzia (Italy), the Silver Pencil Award (the Netherlands), and the Prix de la Fondation de France. On the basis of his entire body of work, Steig was selected as the 1982 U.S. candidate for the Hans Christian Andersen Medal for Illustration and subsequently as the 1988 U.S. candidate for Writing.

Stieg also published thirteen collections of drawings for adults, beginning with About People in 1939, and including The Lonely Ones, Male/Female, The Agony in the Kindergarten, and Our Miserable Life.

He died in Boston at the age of 95.


William Steig (1907-2003) was a cartoonist, illustrator and author of award-winning books for children, including Shrek!, on which the DreamWorks movies are based. Steig was born in New York City. Every member of his family was involved in the arts, and so it was no surprise when he decided to become an artist. He attended City College and the National Academy of Design. In 1930, Steig’s work began appearing in The New Yorker, where his drawings have been a popular fixture ever since. He published his first children's book, Roland the Minstrel Pig, in 1968. In 1970, Steig received the Caldecott Medal for Sylvester and the Magic Pebble. His books for children also include Dominic; The Real Thief; The Amazing Bone, a Caldecott Honor Book; Amos&Boris, a National Book Award finalist; and Abel's Island and Doctor De Soto, both Newbery Honor Books. Steig's books have also received the Christopher Award, the Irma Simonton Black Award, the William Allen White Children's Book Award, and the American Book Award. His European awards include the Premio di Letteratura per l'infanzia (Italy), the Silver Pencil Award (the Netherlands), and the Prix de la Fondation de France. On the basis of his entire body of work, Steig was selected as the 1982 U.S. candidate for the Hans Christian Andersen Medal for Illustration and subsequently as the 1988 U.S. candidate for Writing.  Steig also published thirteen collections of drawings for adults, beginning with About People in 1939, and including The Lonely Ones, Male/Female, The Agony in the Kindergarten, and Our Miserable Life.  He died in Boston at the age of 95.

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Solomon the Rusty Nail 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 2 reviews.
recubejim More than 1 year ago
Reading this book to my son reminded me of my own magical childhood. It sparks imagination.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago