Solzhenitsyn, Tvardovsky, and Novy Mir

Solzhenitsyn, Tvardovsky, and Novy Mir

by Vladimir Lakshin
     
 

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"Lakshin's book ... is also in its own way an interesting depiction of the life of Moscow's literary bureaucracy, a picture very different from the one Solzhenitsyn draws in 'The Oak and the Calf.'"
- Sidney Monas, The New York Times Book Review  See more details below

Overview

"Lakshin's book ... is also in its own way an interesting depiction of the life of Moscow's literary bureaucracy, a picture very different from the one Solzhenitsyn draws in 'The Oak and the Calf.'"
- Sidney Monas, The New York Times Book Review

Editorial Reviews

The New Republic - Edward J. Brown
Vladimir Lakshin was the chief critic of the journal Novy Mir (New World) and the closest associate of its editor, Alexander Tvardovsky, when it published, in November 1962, Solzhenitsyn's short novel,One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich. The editors who performed the feat of bringing to light that revelation of the Stalinist prison camps have a right to be proud of their achievement, and of having attended at the birth in print of a new and powerful literary force. Lakshin in this book asserts their claim to credit and defends himself and Tvardovsky against the 'slanderous caricature' of them, and of the editorial board as a whole, which he finds in Solzhenitsyn's The Oak and the Calf... Lakshin's effort to set the record straight, to enter a defense for those who cannot defend themselves, is admirable.

His book has great poignancy and power.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780262620390
Publisher:
MIT Press
Publication date:
05/04/1982
Series:
MIT Classics Series
Pages:
202
Product dimensions:
17.30(w) x 19.60(h) x 1.00(d)
Age Range:
18 Years

What People are saying about this

From the Publisher
"Vladimir Lakshin was the chief critic of the journal Novy Mir (New World) and the closest associate of its editor, Alexander Tvardovsky, when it published, in November 1962, Solzhenitsyn's short novel, One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich. The editors who performed the feat of bringing to light that revelation of the Stalinist prison camps have a right to be proud of their achievement, and of having attended at the birth in print of a new and powerful literary force. Lakshin in this book asserts their claim to credit and defends himself and Tvardovsky against the 'slanderous caricature' of them, and of the editorial board as a whole, which he finds in Solzhenitsyn's The Oak and the Calf... Lakshin's effort to set the record straight, to enter a defense for those who cannot defend themselves, is admirable. His book has great poignancy and power." Edward J. Brown , The New Republic

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