Some Account Of The History Of Churchdown

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north-west corner of the hill, passing the Roman Well, and so gaining the camp on the summit. There is no doubt that in former ages this " way" was well shielded from observation by having banks on each side of it, well covered ...
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Overview

Purchase of this book includes free trial access to www.million-books.com where you can read more than a million books for free.
This is an OCR edition with typos.
Excerpt from book:
north-west corner of the hill, passing the Roman Well, and so gaining the camp on the summit. There is no doubt that in former ages this " way" was well shielded from observation by having banks on each side of it, well covered with trees and scrub. On gaining the summit of the hill, there are to be seen excavations, embankments, and old workings, which must not be taken always to be of ancient formation, as some of them are certainly the work of modern quarrymen. Mr. Baker, writing to the Society of Antiquaries, says, " Churchdown Camp has a very irregular shape, conforming entirely to that of the ground, and little that is satisfactory can be said of it from the fact of its having been rendered imperfect by stone digging." Mr. G. F. Playne (F.G.S.) says, " This hill has been left by the denuding agents, which have acted upon it, with a very remarkable surface and outline. Bold knolls have been left so steep-sided and so irregular, as to appear like artificial mounds; whilst a large level space in their midst has the appearance of being defended by these mound-like ridges. When seen from the south, say from the neighbourhood of Hucclecote, on the Ermin Street (or high. road), Churchdown Hill has the appearance of a vast fortress, the ledges of Marlstone standing out from narrow terraces, with steep banks below them. From these terraces rise rampart- like mounds, with moat-like hollows between them. From its commanding position in the Vale, and its natural strength, the hill was probablyoccupied occasionally by the early inhabitants of our country, but the nature of its soil, the damp tenacious Lias must have rendered it unfit for a permanent camping ground." The Church of St. Bartholomew is built within the camp, as the mounds of earthworks include both the church andch...
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780554664101
  • Publisher: BiblioBazaar
  • Publication date: 8/20/2008
  • Pages: 116
  • Product dimensions: 8.00 (w) x 5.00 (h) x 0.24 (d)

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north-west corner of the hill, passing the Roman Well, and so gaining the camp on the summit. There is no doubt that in former ages this " way" was well shielded from observation by having banks on each side of it, well covered with trees and scrub. On gaining the summit of the hill, there are to be seen excavations, embankments, and old workings, which must not be taken always to be of ancient formation, as some of them are certainly the work of modern quarrymen. Mr. Baker, writing to the Society of Antiquaries, says, " Churchdown Camp has a very irregular shape, conforming entirely to that of the ground, and little that is satisfactory can be said of it from the fact of its having been rendered imperfect by stone digging." Mr. G. F. Playne (F.G.S.) says, " This hill has been left by the denuding agents, which have acted upon it, with a very remarkable surface and outline. Bold knolls have been left so steep-sided and so irregular, as to appear like artificial mounds; whilst a large level space in their midst has the appearance of being defended by these mound-like ridges. When seen from the south, say from the neighbourhood of Hucclecote, on the Ermin Street (or high. road), Churchdown Hill has the appearance of a vast fortress, the ledges of Marlstone standing out from narrow terraces, with steep banks below them. From these terraces rise rampart- like mounds, with moat-like hollows between them. From its commanding position in the Vale, and its natural strength, the hill was probably occupied occasionally by the early inhabitants of our country, but the nature of its soil, the damp tenacious Lias must have rendered it unfit for a permanent camping ground." The Church of St.Bartholomew is built within the camp, as the mounds of earthworks include both the church andch...
Read More Show Less

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