Some Are Sicker Than Others

Some Are Sicker Than Others

2.6 8
by Andrew Seaward
     
 

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ADDICTION: CUNNING, BAFFLING, & POWERFUL

In this gripping debut novel by Andrew Seaward, the lives of three addicts converge following an accidental and horrific death.

Monty Miller, a self-destructive, codependent alcoholic, is wracked by an obsession to drink himself to death as punishment for a fatal car accident he didn't cause.

Dave Bell, a former

Overview

ADDICTION: CUNNING, BAFFLING, & POWERFUL

In this gripping debut novel by Andrew Seaward, the lives of three addicts converge following an accidental and horrific death.

Monty Miller, a self-destructive, codependent alcoholic, is wracked by an obsession to drink himself to death as punishment for a fatal car accident he didn't cause.

Dave Bell, a former all-American track star turned washed-up high school volleyball coach, routinely chauffeurs his bus full of teens on a belly full of liquor and head full of crack.

Angie Mallard, a recently divorced housewife with three estranged children, will go to any lengths to restore the family she lost to crystal meth.

All three are court-mandated to a secluded drug rehab high in the foothills of the Rocky Mountains. There, they learn the universal truth among alcoholics and addicts:

Though they may all be sick...SOME ARE SICKER THAN OTHERS.

Based on the author's own personal experience with substance abuse and twelve-step programs, Some Are Sicker Than Others, transcends the clichés of the typical recovery story by exploring the insidiousness of addiction and the harrowing effect it has on not just the afflicted, but everyone it touches.

With the harsh realism of Brett Easton Ellis and the dark, confrontational humor of Chuck Palahniuk, Mr. Seaward takes the reader deep inside the psyche of the addict and portrays, in very explicit details, the psychological and physiological effects of withdrawal and the various stages of recovery.

Editorial Reviews

Author of MOSQUITO - Doug Kurtz
"Dark...gritty...Compelling...Seaward’s ironic ending raises more questions than it answers, revealing all the complexities and ambiguities of addiction, and immersing the reader in a harrowingly emotional experience that rings true to the very last word."
POETS & ARTISTS Magazine - Grady Harp
"Seaward not only weaves an exceptionally well-constructed story with wholly credible characters, he offers deeper insights and relates more factual information about the disease of addiction than any other writer to date."
THE BOOKWORM JUST ATE Book Reviews - Ashley LaMar
"This book will lead you on a serious rollercoaster ride of emotions. Mr. Seaward discusses in very explicit details the mental, psychological, and physical effects of withdrawal and the various stages of recovery. It is a very difficult book to read, but only because it is so honest and direct and confrontational. It forces the reader to view and accept the world of addiction and recovery."
Psychologist - Dr. Patricia Laster
"This is a very dark, harsh, unmerciful look at addiction with unrelenting exposure of its consequences."
West Wind Book Marketing - Scott Lorenz
"RESERVATION ROAD meets A MILLION LITTLE PIECES in this harrowing story of loss, grief, atonement, and redemption."

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780615624501
Publisher:
Flophouse Books
Publication date:
04/13/2012
Pages:
390
Sales rank:
762,647
Product dimensions:
5.50(w) x 8.50(h) x 0.87(d)

Meet the Author

Andrew Seaward is an award-winning author, actor, and screenwriter. He has written and acted in a number of independent productions, including the critically-acclaimed short film, Drowning, which earned the prestigious Award of Merit at the 2010 Indie Fest. A recovering addict himself, Andrew understands the viciousness of addiction. As a result, he has dedicated his life to removing the unfair stigma associated with addiction by encouraging fellow addicts to celebrate their recovery through artistic endeavors. For more information on Andrew and his projects please visit: www.portraitsofaddiction.com

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Some Are Sicker Than Others 2.6 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 8 reviews.
Dawson59 More than 1 year ago
Great story interrupted with bad editing I can see where this book would appeal to those who are recovering or folks who know someone who has lived this hell. It is an engrossing read, detailing the lives of addicts. However, this book needs to be sent to a professional editor.   Angie, Sarah, (Angie’s daughter), Dave, and Monty are the main characters. Angie, Dave and Monty all wind up in rehab. It appears they were admitted against their will. Enter Jerry Springer. Angie is dating Sarah’s (17) ex-boyfriend Rick (28) a meth head and distributor. Really? Mom and dad didn’t have a problem with this?    Pro’s: There is a hard hitting story about addicts who are constantly living in denial and blaming everyone for their ills. Now that’s a good story line from an author who admits to being an addict. My hats off. Con’s: Too many to list. Face tags are in extreme overabundance. When only two people are talking, we don’t need to see their names every sentence. The word “got” is a glaring irritation. Surely the author could have spent a little more time with these sentences.  I also lost count of the run-on compound sentences. I found thirty-four instances in the first thirty-six pages. After a while, like his characters, I didn’t care. Come on man, do your work the justice it deserves.  Sentence structure: It’s very unusual and convoluted. Now, this being a book on addiction, perhaps it was deliberate. Once a point is made, why is it followed with extraneous and unnecessary descriptions? And then there are the ones where I was scratching my head. Here are some examples: 1) “he said, in barley a whisper, as is if didn’t have the strength to use his vocal chords.” We get it, move on. 2) “in one fluid motion, pushed it into the swirling red ambulance.” The ambulance is swirling?  3) “The table just looked at him, like he was crazy.” Really? The table looked at him? How about, “the group at the table looked at him…”  I mean, many other events are detailed down to the last iota. Why stop here?   There’s a host of others, but you get the idea.  Operations of cars: This became maddening. I lost count how many times we were told how to start a car and scrape the ice off windows. Really?  The rehab center: Sanctuary. I really had a difficult time believe this scenario. Why? Okay, those who are in the detox trailer, (where all the drugs are stored) is only manned by one nurse and seventy-five percent of the time, no ones watching the store so the patients have easy access to all the pills they can steal? And for a highly recommended institution, there’s only two other people in the complex: Jordan, the head councilor/owner and Nick, a recovering meth head? Seriously? I kept wondering, where’s everyone else? Guess they’re all on coffee breaks or something.   I’m sure this review is going to receive a flurry of down votes. Look, it’s a promising story, but if the author would take the time to tighten it up, it’s definitely a blockbuster. Yes, it currently has 108 reviews, but why settle for mediocrity when it could easily garner 300+? Content is a five. Editing is a two. 
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Well written. Probably won't appeal to people not in recovery. Those without an addiction history will never understand it. Those in recovery will appreciate the problems these people run into.
NookLoverMM More than 1 year ago
I started this book, got halfway through and have no real desire to finish it. If you are looking to read a minute by minute life of an alcoholic or drug abuser, by all means start reading. I really have no desire to continue reading about vomiting in a toilet & waking up having no idea what happened. So far, I can't find any real value in this book other that it does tell you minute by minute what the life of the addicted is like.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Being well-acquainted with addiction and treatment, this novel seemed poorly researched. It could have been better and presented a truer picture of alcoholism, addiction and even treatment.
BugnChuck More than 1 year ago
I thought this book was awful. If I could give it a half star that would still be too much. Although the subject matter was interesting, the dialog between the characters was often downright silly or simple. The editing was poor and the ending just....ended. I would not recommend this book.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago