Someday a Tree

Someday a Tree

by Eve Bunting, Ronald Himler
     
 

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Alice is dismayed when one day the leaves on the old oak tree start to fall. Although she can't save the tree, Alice remembers something that gives her hope: the acorns she collected when the tree was still healthy.See more details below

Overview


Alice is dismayed when one day the leaves on the old oak tree start to fall. Although she can't save the tree, Alice remembers something that gives her hope: the acorns she collected when the tree was still healthy.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

"Himler's sensitive, evocative watercolors make a fine complement to the lyrical, perceptive text." Kirkus Reviews
Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
"Nostalgia and timeliness merge seamlessly in this uncommonly evocative picture book," said PW in a starred review. "The story's emotional impact-and environmental message-are movingly reinforced by Himler's delicate paintings." Ages 5-8. (Mar.)
School Library Journal
K-Gr 3-- A sensitive book with an environmental theme. A family relaxes and engages in picnics, naps, storytelling, and plain fun under a gigantic old oak tree on their country property. One day, young Alice notices that the grass under the tree smells funny and is turning yellow. The oak's leaves start to fall, even though it is spring. A tree doctor discovers that the soil has been poisoned, probably by illegally dumped chemicals. Neighbors pitch in: the poisoned dirt is carted off, the fire department sprays water, sacking is wrapped around top branches, and the telephone company loans poles from which to hang sunscreens. The tree dies despite the efforts to save it. Finally, Alice remembers her collection of acorns, which she rushes out and plants in healthy ground near the tree. Himler's soft, realistic watercolors spread over double pages and complement the sensitive, poetic mood of the story. In increasing numbers, teachers are asking for picture books on ecological issues. This title joins Van Allsburg's Just a Dream (Houghton, 1990) and Ruth Brown's The World That Jack Built (Dutton, 1991) in serving that demand. --Jacqueline Elsner, Athens Regional Library, GA
Hazel Rochman
This soft-toned picture book focuses an ecology message through the fate of one tree. Alice knows that the huge oak tree in the meadow has been there for hundreds and hundreds of years. She loves the afternoons she spends in its shade with her mother and her sheepdog, picnicking and listening to stories, especially the stories about how her parents bought the land and came to live there, and how she was christened under the tree "and a bird did you-know-what on the Reverend's head." But the tree has been poisoned, probably by the illegal dumping of chemicals, and is dying. Despite all kinds of remedies from scientists, neighbors, and friends, and from people who leave get-well cards and even chicken soup, the leaves fall, the animals leave, the branches wither. Himler's watercolors express the quiet harmony of the green shady scene where you can dream and hear leaves whisper and see "clouds change like smoke." One idyllic double-page spread shows the tree making a circle with the people it shelters. In contrast are the dying branches, propped up by poles and meshed with wire, shrunken and bare. Only in the final scene, when Alice plants the acorns she's collected from the tree, is there a promise of renewal.

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780395613092
Publisher:
Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
Publication date:
03/28/1993
Pages:
32
Product dimensions:
8.25(w) x 10.00(h) x 0.13(d)
Age Range:
5 - 8 Years

Meet the Author

EVE BUNTING has written over two hundred books for children, including the Caldecott Medal-winning Smoky Night, illustrated by David Diaz, The Wall, Fly Away Home, and Train to Somewhere. She lives in Southern California.

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