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Someone Bigger
     

Someone Bigger

by Jonathan Emmett, Adrian Reynolds (Illustrator)
 

Sam can't wait to try out his new kite, but Dad says he's too small to fly it alone-it needs someone bigger. When Dad launches the kite, a strong wind pulls it into the sky. But the wind is so strong that it pulls Dad up, too! Only one person can rescue this runaway kite, and Sam knows just who that someone is. With bouncy text-in a combination of rhyme and

Overview


Sam can't wait to try out his new kite, but Dad says he's too small to fly it alone-it needs someone bigger. When Dad launches the kite, a strong wind pulls it into the sky. But the wind is so strong that it pulls Dad up, too! Only one person can rescue this runaway kite, and Sam knows just who that someone is. With bouncy text-in a combination of rhyme and prose-and cheery art, this whimsical story is just right for anyone who's ever felt not big enough.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

"Fun...the story, the writing, and the art - a triple threat in the picture-book department...cheerful...buoyant...full of... whimsy." KIRKUS REVIEWS Kirkus Reviews

"humorous watercolor scenes...kids will cheer his heroics...catchy rhymes and colorful art...a good choice for a spring storytime." ALA BOOKLIST Booklist, ALA

"...[a] winning fable about competence and confidence." PUBLISHERS WEEKLY Publishers Weekly

"colorful watercolor cartoons depict the bouncy adventure...singsong verses...A great choice for storytime and one-on-one sharing." School Library Journal

"Sam's refrain will soon have listeners joining in as they delight in the familiar structure...a gentle triumph for kids." BULLETIN OF THE CENTER FOR CHILDREN'S BOOKS The Bulletin of the Center for Children's Books

Publishers Weekly
In Emmett's (Bringing Down the Moon) winning fable about competence and confidence, young Sam believes he's old enough to take the reins of his new kite, which Reynolds (Harry and the Dinosaurs) depicts as larger than the young hero (and nearly as large as Dad). "No, you're too small!" says Dad. "This kite needs someone bigger." Then the wind kicks up, and the father finds himself flying. Several other adults ("a postman with a sack of mail,/ a bank robber, escaped from jail...," a bride, her groom, etc.) plus some hefty critters try to pull the kite down, only to be taken aloft. "Can I hold it now?/ .../ I'm old enough-/ I know I am!" Sam asks each time another victim ascends. "No, you're too small!" comes the refrain. "This kite needs someone bigger!" Reynolds's fine black line limns strong, crisp shapes and his saturated watercolors make a wonderful foil for the improbable aerodynamics. Because the pictures never cross over into cartoonishness, the focus remains on the earthbound Sam and his determination to prove his mastery. Finally, when Sam is the only one not airborne, he grabs the string "and even though he wound and wound,/ his feet stayed firmly on the ground." With everyone returned to terra firma, Emmett and Reynolds offer satisfaction to young readers on two counts-Sam not only gets his moment of triumph, he also gets to say, "told you so." Age 4-7. (Mar.) Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.
Children's Literature
This is a delightful tale of lyrical text and fanciful pictures as Sam and his dad have adventures with the kite they have made. They chose a windy day to try it out. Sam wants to try it out first but his dad tells him he is too little. While Sam is wishing he were bigger, his dad launches the kite into the sky. It pulls Sam's dad higher and higher until he is above the town and people everywhere try to pull him down. The postman, bank robber and policeman all try to help, but they are pulled up too. Firemen, a rhino and other animals from the zoo are pulled up as Sam runs after his dad, wanting to hold the kite. Sam saves the day by grabbing hold of the kite and he is able to keep his feet on the ground as everyone comes back down to earth. A fun story for readers proving that bigger doesn't always mean better. 2003, Clarion Books/Houghton Mifflin Company, Ages 4 to 7.
—Michele Wilbur
School Library Journal
PreS-Gr 1-When Sam and his father embark on a day of kite flying, the boy repeatedly asks to hold the string, but is told that he is too little. As the kite gathers strength, it carries off first his father and then many unsuspecting people who happen to be in its path-including a bank robber, a bride and groom, a postman, and a policeman on a horse. Sam is told by all in a repeated refrain: "No, you're too small/-This kite needs/someone bigger." Finally, the child proves his worth by seizing the string and winding the kite and all of the hangers-on to safety. Reynolds's colorful watercolor cartoons depict the bouncy adventure, which is told in singsong verses. Sam sums it up with, "I'm not too small, and as you see,/this kite needs someone/JUST/LIKE/ME!" Young readers will appreciate the boy's predicament and love the fact that, despite his small stature, he saves the day. A great choice for storytime and one-on-one sharing.-G. Alyssa Parkinson, Highland Township Library, MI Copyright 2004 Reed Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
This fun outing has three things going for it: the story, the writing, and the art-a triple threat in the picture-book department. The rhymed narrative is cheerful, telling the cumulative tale of a kite that keeps going skyward, taking Dad and a host of others-including a postman, a bank robber, " . . . a policeman riding on a horse, / a bridegroom (and his bride, of course)," even a rhinoceros, a tiger, and a kangaroo-up for a surprise ride when they grab the string. Young Sam keeps pleading-"Can I hold it now? . . . I'm old enough-I know I am!" But the refrain is refrained: "No, you're too small! . . . This kite needs someone bigger." When Sam finally gets his hands on the string, he pulls them all back to terra firma. No tricks, just so-"I'm not too small, and as you see, this kite needs someone just like me!" Bravo, Sam, and a decided nod to Reynolds's art, too, with its buoyant, serene tomfoolery full of round-mouthed, dot-eyed whimsy. (Picture book. 3-6)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780618443970
Publisher:
Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
Publication date:
03/22/2004
Pages:
32
Product dimensions:
9.90(w) x 11.40(h) x 0.40(d)
Age Range:
4 - 7 Years

Meet the Author

Jonathan Emmett is the author of A Turtle in the Toilet and A Mouse in the Marmalade, both illustrated by Caroline Jayne Church. He lives in Nottingham, England, with his family.

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