Someone Could Get Hurt: A Memoir of Twenty-First-Century Parenthood

Someone Could Get Hurt: A Memoir of Twenty-First-Century Parenthood

4.1 17
by Drew Magary
     
 

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A sharp, funny, and heartfelt memoir about fatherhood and the ups and downs of raising a family in modern America

No one writes about family quite like Drew Magary. The GQ correspondent and Deadspin columnist’s stories about trying to raise a family have attracted millions of readers online. And now he’s finally bringing thatSee more details below

Overview

A sharp, funny, and heartfelt memoir about fatherhood and the ups and downs of raising a family in modern America

No one writes about family quite like Drew Magary. The GQ correspondent and Deadspin columnist’s stories about trying to raise a family have attracted millions of readers online. And now he’s finally bringing that unique voice to a memoir. In Someone Could Get Hurt, he reflects on his own parenting experiences to explore the anxiety, rationalizations, compromises, and overpowering love that come with raising children in contemporary America.

In brutally honest and funny stories, Magary reveals how American mothers and fathers cope with being in over their heads (getting drunk while trick-or-treating, watching helplessly as a child defiantly pees in a hotel pool, engaging in role-play with a princess-crazed daughter), and how stepping back can sometimes make all the difference (talking a toddler down from the third story of a netted-in playhouse, allowing children to make little mistakes in the kitchen to keep them from making the bigger ones in life). It’s a celebration of all the surprises—joyful and otherwise—that come with being part of a real family.

In the wake of recent bestsellers that expose how every other culture raises their children better, Someone Could Get Hurt offers a hilarious and heartfelt defense of American child rearing with a glimpse into the genuine love and compassion that accompany the missteps and flawed logic. It’s the story of head lice, almost-dirty words, and flat head syndrome, and a man trying to commit the ultimate act of selflessness in a selfish world.

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Two parents squirm their way into contemporary American adulthood in this hilarious and heartfelt account. Deadspin and GQ columnist Magary (The Postmortal) writes with his usual panache and en-dearing vulgarity on a variety of stories about his nuclear family, but never shies away from a tender moment. Whether he is correcting his children's pizza-making abilities or teaching them the sheer joys of "petty vandalism", Magary and his wife puzzle out the complexities and nuances of parenthood. The volume is bookended by the tale of the youngest son—who requires "disemboweling" due to a rare condition—and the fragility and beauty of life is underscored by the honest and endearing anec-dotes throughout. Realizing that "baby helmets are a rotten lie" even after cracking his daughter's head against a doorframe in a daycare center, Magary gets to the story's core: what is required of these young parents is not an ultra-conservative, over-protective approach, or even one that allows kids to "do as many things on their own as humanly possible." The crux of their care-giving is altruism and providing genuine love, even if that care comes from an individual dressed as "a slow guy", drinking while trick-or-treating with his children: vulgar parenting at its best. (May)
From the Publisher
“It’s an honest and hilarious portrayal of how aggravating it can be to raise a family.” —Justin Halpern, author of the New York Times bestseller Sh*t My Dad Says

“The world needs Drew Magary’s wonderfully funny, breathtakingly honest book about parenting.”
—Jen Doll, memoirist and senior writer at The Atlantic Wire

“The Father's Day book for dads who hate getting books for Father’s Day.”
—Will Leitch, author of Are We Winning? and God Save the Fan

“If you are a parent, I challenge you to not simultaneously laugh and sob through this entire book.”
—Rachel Dratch, comedian and author of Girl Walks into a Bar...

Praise for Drew Magary’s THE POSTMORTAL

"Unnerving. . . . An absorbing picture of dawning apocalypse. . . . A disturbing portrait of a society convinced it's close to utopia when a cure for aging is invented. Unsurprisingly, it doesn't take long for that seeming utopia to dissolve into a planet-overstressed from overpopulation, food and fuel shortages, and general lawlessness-going into systemic failure. . . . The Postmortal is a suitably chilling entry into the 'it's-the-end-of-the-world' canon."

The Austin Chronicle

"Magary's vision of future technology and science is eerily realistic. . . . By the time you finish, you'll want to hold your loved ones close and stockpile bottles of water. If all else fails, you could potentially make a living selling them a few decades from now."
The New York Press

"Magary's vision of future technology and science is eerily realistic. . . . By the time you finish, you'll want to hold your loved ones close and stockpile bottles of water. If all else fails, you could potentially make a living selling them a few decades from now."
Mark Frauenfelder, Boing Boing

"Immortality has figured in a number of sf novels prior to this one, but never, to my experience, in this way. . . . A very clear-eyed picture, one I don't think has been drawn before. . . . The Postmortal surprised me in a good way."
Michelle West, Fantasy & Science Fiction Magazine

"The Postmortal is a punchy, fast-paced and endearing story. . . . As the novel progresses, it turns from a snappy morality tale, to a noir- ish revenge fable, to an action movie; complete with guns, rogue religious cults and government-sanctioned hit men. The narrative comes to us through John's blog entries and collections of news bytes and pundit commentary. Through his sixty years as a 29-year-old, he experiences all the love, pain, grief, and terror of a standard lifetime and is still in good enough shape to kick some ass at the end. Like much good dystopian fiction, The Postmortal is an at-times unflattering commentary on human beings, present, past and future, that hits the mark in many ways. . . . For anyone intrigued with Life Extension science, it's a fun examination of our fears and expectations."
The Nervous Breakdown

"A darkly comic, totally gonzo, and effectively frightening population- bomb dystopia in the spirit of Logan's Run, Soylent Green, and the best episodes of The Twilight Zone."
Neal Pollack, author of Alternadad and Stretch

"As insanely entertaining as it is ambitious, The Postmortal takes us into an America set in the next few years and coming apart under the onslaught of a dreadful new plague—that of human immortality. Magary possesses an explosive imagination and let loose in The Postmortal, he creates an alternate history of the near future that feels real and is probably inevitable. Read The Postmortal if you want to find out what happened to the human race in our last violent and absurd few years in New York."
Evan Wright, author of Generation Kill

"As someone who is totally freaked out by the thought of dying, The Postmortal really stood on top of me and peed on my face. It's depiction of the future isn't filled with crappy robots fighting Will Smith. It's filled with eerily realistic portrayals of what the future could look like and does it all in an incredibly entertaining story."
Justin Halpern, author of Sh*t My Dad Says

"The first novel from a popular sports blogger and humorist puts a darkly comic spin on a science fiction premise and hits the sweet spot between Margaret Atwood and Kurt Vonnegut. . . . [Magary] understands that satire is most effective when it gives the real world a gently absurd nudge, then lets its characters react much as we ourselves might under the same circumstances."
Ron Hogan, Shelf Awareness

Praise for Drew Magary’s MEN WITH BALLS

"Men with Balls is funny, completely uninformative, and horrifyingly profane. In short: the perfect book."
Michael Schur, Co-Executive Producer of The Office

"Profane, beyond naughty, and, I have to say, just damn funny."
Buzz Bissinger, author of Friday Night Lights

"One of the funniest books I've ever read—the product of a meticulously demented mind. Required reading for anyone who loves sports, and any athlete who knows how to read."
Will Leitch, founder of Deadspin

"I hope to one day write a book that is even comparable to Men with Balls. It is definitely a must-read."
Chris Cooley, Pro Bowl tight end, Washington Redskins

"Drew Magary possesses a keen insight into pro sports' unyielding loads of crap. Men with Balls oozes with, well, balls."
Jeff Pearlman, author of Sweetness

"Extremely funny. And I'm not just saying that because Drew gives me free mustache rides every Thursday."
Jay Chandrasekhar, cowriter and director of Super Troopers and Club Dread

"Men with Balls is a terrifyingly astute takedown of pro sports masquerading as brilliant satire."
Stefan Fatsis, author of A Few Seconds of Panic and Word Freak

Kirkus Reviews
The pride and pitfalls of contemporary fatherhood. The panic of emergency surgery on a premature baby with a rare intestinal disorder resonates from the riveting first chapter of novelist Magary's (The Postmortal, 2011, etc.) memoir. The scene captures the author's knack for electric prose as he dictates the wild, wooly world of parenthood. Magary doesn't mince words about the many blissfully unencumbered years of marriage before he and his wife had children ("You can live cheaply. You can do drugs. You're mobile, with no goddamn kids anchoring you to one location. You can even get divorced with a minimum of fuss"), freely partaking of spontaneous beach trips and a particular Oasis concert the writer recalls with an acerbic, fork-tongued wit many readers will either love or hate. Potent anecdotes about their first child are laugh-out-loud funny, but when coupled with the descriptive ordeal of a second child by C-section, Magary's life becomes awash in baby monitors, an unfortunate DUI, head lice and toddler conflict resolution. A healthy sense of humor and a modern outlook on life is necessary to "get" much of what irks the author about being a parent in a memoir that shines with refreshing realness. For all his potty-mouthed, free-form commentary, Magary demonstrates a noble belief in love, honor and freeze-framing moments with kids who always seem to grow up way too fast. Missteps and foibles aside, the author admits to being happy and grateful as a family man, "even if it isn't as fun a life as when you were single and drinking shots…in the Giants Stadium parking lot." An outspoken dad's brassy, wise and painfully honest view from the top of the family tree.

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781101621806
Publisher:
Penguin Publishing Group
Publication date:
05/16/2013
Sold by:
Penguin Group
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
256
Sales rank:
90,567
File size:
1 MB
Age Range:
18 Years

What People are saying about this

From the Publisher
“It’s an honest and hilarious portrayal of how aggravating it can be to raise a family.”  —Justin Halpern, author of the New York Times bestseller Sh*t My Dad Says

“The world needs Drew Magary’s wonderfully funny, breathtakingly honest book about parenting.”
—Jen Doll, memoirist and senior writer at The Atlantic Wire

“The Father's Day book for dads who hate getting books for Father’s Day.”
—Will Leitch, author of Are We Winning? and God Save the Fan

“If you are a parent, I challenge you to not simultaneously laugh and sob through this entire book.”
—Rachel Dratch, comedian and author of Girl Walks into a Bar...

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