Someone Could Get Hurt: A Memoir of Twenty-First-Century Parenthood

( 12 )

Overview

A sharp, funny, and heartfelt memoir about fatherhood and the ups and downs of raising a family in modern America

No one writes about family quite like Drew Magary. The GQ correspondent and Deadspin columnist’s stories about trying to raise a family have attracted millions of readers online. And now he’s finally bringing that unique voice to a memoir. In Someone Could Get Hurt, he reflects on his own parenting experiences to explore the anxiety, rationalizations, compromises, ...

See more details below
Hardcover
$17.50
BN.com price
(Save 30%)$25.00 List Price

Pick Up In Store

Reserve and pick up in 60 minutes at your local store

Other sellers (Hardcover)
  • All (36) from $1.99   
  • New (19) from $1.99   
  • Used (17) from $1.99   
Someone Could Get Hurt: A Memoir of Twenty-First-Century Parenthood

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • NOOK HD/HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK Study
  • NOOK for Web

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook)
$9.99
BN.com price

Overview

A sharp, funny, and heartfelt memoir about fatherhood and the ups and downs of raising a family in modern America

No one writes about family quite like Drew Magary. The GQ correspondent and Deadspin columnist’s stories about trying to raise a family have attracted millions of readers online. And now he’s finally bringing that unique voice to a memoir. In Someone Could Get Hurt, he reflects on his own parenting experiences to explore the anxiety, rationalizations, compromises, and overpowering love that come with raising children in contemporary America.

In brutally honest and funny stories, Magary reveals how American mothers and fathers cope with being in over their heads (getting drunk while trick-or-treating, watching helplessly as a child defiantly pees in a hotel pool, engaging in role-play with a princess-crazed daughter), and how stepping back can sometimes make all the difference (talking a toddler down from the third story of a netted-in playhouse, allowing children to make little mistakes in the kitchen to keep them from making the bigger ones in life). It’s a celebration of all the surprises—joyful and otherwise—that come with being part of a real family.

In the wake of recent bestsellers that expose how every other culture raises their children better, Someone Could Get Hurt offers a hilarious and heartfelt defense of American child rearing with a glimpse into the genuine love and compassion that accompany the missteps and flawed logic. It’s the story of head lice, almost-dirty words, and flat head syndrome, and a man trying to commit the ultimate act of selflessness in a selfish world.

Read More Show Less
  • Someone Could Get Hurt
    Someone Could Get Hurt  

Editorial Reviews

From Barnes & Noble

Since I became a mom some eight years ago, I have read a LOT of parenting memoirs. This is the best one by a mile.

You may already be familiar with Magary's parenting blog on the sports website www.deadspin.com. I was, so I knew he was hilarious and foul-mouthed on the subject of raising children. But this book is so much more, and even caused me to tear up in a few places.

I want every parent I know to read this. If you're skeptical, just pick it up and read either "Princesses and Palefaces" or "Faka," (which is the best description of parental frustration and helplessness I have ever read) and then make your own decision.

This is an easy handsell for people who read Jim Gaffigan's Dad Is Fat. Magary's book is both funnier and more relatable.

—Lee Anne Test, ASM,
#2860, Columbia OH

Publishers Weekly
Two parents squirm their way into contemporary American adulthood in this hilarious and heartfelt account. Deadspin and GQ columnist Magary (The Postmortal) writes with his usual panache and en-dearing vulgarity on a variety of stories about his nuclear family, but never shies away from a tender moment. Whether he is correcting his children's pizza-making abilities or teaching them the sheer joys of "petty vandalism", Magary and his wife puzzle out the complexities and nuances of parenthood. The volume is bookended by the tale of the youngest son—who requires "disemboweling" due to a rare condition—and the fragility and beauty of life is underscored by the honest and endearing anec-dotes throughout. Realizing that "baby helmets are a rotten lie" even after cracking his daughter's head against a doorframe in a daycare center, Magary gets to the story's core: what is required of these young parents is not an ultra-conservative, over-protective approach, or even one that allows kids to "do as many things on their own as humanly possible." The crux of their care-giving is altruism and providing genuine love, even if that care comes from an individual dressed as "a slow guy", drinking while trick-or-treating with his children: vulgar parenting at its best. (May)
Kirkus Reviews
The pride and pitfalls of contemporary fatherhood. The panic of emergency surgery on a premature baby with a rare intestinal disorder resonates from the riveting first chapter of novelist Magary's (The Postmortal, 2011, etc.) memoir. The scene captures the author's knack for electric prose as he dictates the wild, wooly world of parenthood. Magary doesn't mince words about the many blissfully unencumbered years of marriage before he and his wife had children ("You can live cheaply. You can do drugs. You're mobile, with no goddamn kids anchoring you to one location. You can even get divorced with a minimum of fuss"), freely partaking of spontaneous beach trips and a particular Oasis concert the writer recalls with an acerbic, fork-tongued wit many readers will either love or hate. Potent anecdotes about their first child are laugh-out-loud funny, but when coupled with the descriptive ordeal of a second child by C-section, Magary's life becomes awash in baby monitors, an unfortunate DUI, head lice and toddler conflict resolution. A healthy sense of humor and a modern outlook on life is necessary to "get" much of what irks the author about being a parent in a memoir that shines with refreshing realness. For all his potty-mouthed, free-form commentary, Magary demonstrates a noble belief in love, honor and freeze-framing moments with kids who always seem to grow up way too fast. Missteps and foibles aside, the author admits to being happy and grateful as a family man, "even if it isn't as fun a life as when you were single and drinking shots…in the Giants Stadium parking lot." An outspoken dad's brassy, wise and painfully honest view from the top of the family tree.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781592408320
  • Publisher: Gotham
  • Publication date: 5/16/2013
  • Pages: 256
  • Sales rank: 297,348
  • Product dimensions: 5.90 (w) x 8.32 (h) x 0.95 (d)

Meet the Author

Drew Magary is a correspondent for GQ and a columnist for Deadspin and Gawker. He’s also the author of the critically acclaimed novel The Postmortal and Men with Balls. He lives in Maryland with his wife and three kids.

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 12 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(7)

4 Star

(3)

3 Star

(1)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(1)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing all of 12 Customer Reviews
  • Posted May 23, 2013

    I Also Recommend:

    This is a great book about being a parent in modern America. The

    This is a great book about being a parent in modern America. The stories range from laugh out loud funny to serious, and all are well worth reading. A five star book.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 17, 2013

    I Also Recommend:

    Parents Buy This! This is a frank look at one man's account of

    Parents Buy This!

    This is a frank look at one man's account of raising children. Anyone who is a parent will laugh out loud at his stories. 

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 11, 2013

    Go to DeadSpin and read the HATE this author writes about a Spor

    Go to DeadSpin and read the HATE this author writes about a Sports team and their fan-base. I will NEVER take advice from a man who goes into such detail about his passion of hate for a town and people he's never met! He's a liar in this book, he just wants your money. His true colors show during his newest blog, "Why Your Cardinals Suck". 

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 25, 2013

    Hilarious

    Great book. So funny and totally relatable.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 23, 2013

    Relatable for thirtysomething parents

    As a 30-something dad of two children, I thought this would be an interesting read. Truthfully, the title and cover art caught my eye while I was browsing, and so I bought the book. I was a little familiar with Drew Magary from Deadspin and Esquire, so this wasn't a completely blind buy.

    Overall, the book was enjoyable and many of the stories relatable. Magary's trademark writing style is on full display and he doesn't disappoint. He is vulgar at times, and mostly his exclamations were well placed, but there were times when I thought his language was too much. This isn't a huge distraction from the pieces, but some of the stories would have read better without them. What I liked best about Magary's book is that these stories don't hold any punches; there is no "rainbows and lollipops" mindset and Magary is honest about his own shortcomings and the challenges of parenting. Also, as a thirtysomething dad, I could relate to Drew's frustration with the "bumbling dad" stereotype and that 21st century parenting is tough because it feels like someone is always watching you, and it's harder to be a good parent rather than the parent everyone else thinks you should be.

    As far as the individual stories go, "Faka" made me laugh the most (we should all be able to relate in some way), and we've all had to deal with peeing in the pool, and I could definitely relate to the challenge of parenting your child when your parents are around.

    Magary's best pieces are the first and the last story which are both about his third child who was born a preemie with a life-threatening birth defect. These stories stick with you because Magary does a wonderful job relating the emotions that he and his wife were dealing with throughout their ordeal. I found myself on the verge of tears at several points (not just when he's talking about his own children, but also when he discusses other babies and their parents in the NICU). This honest retelling of his experience reinforced the value of life and how grateful I am for my own children. Without these two pieces, this book is a 3-star book; however, these give the book some heft beyond the lighter comedic tales and make it a 4-star work.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 12, 2013

    Mostly side-splitting

    I read this book while I was nursing, and laughed so hard the baby had to look up to see what was going on. There are very poignant bits, but mostly it is about how crazy kids and parents are.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 19, 2013

    Funny & Honest

    A fun and honest book about parenting... lots of situations I could relate to personally.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 3, 2013

    An okay weekend timewaster

    Some of the early parenting stories are pretty damn funny, laugh out loud on the bus like an insane person funny. But after awhile it became a little boring reading about the author letting his kids walk all over him while he cries. And while the closing story is a nightmare no one should have to live through, kind of a buzz kill for the closer. Always leave em laughing.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 21, 2013

    Cruisin for a bruisin

    The Magary book I was waiting for.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 17, 2013

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted July 5, 2013

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted August 26, 2013

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing all of 12 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)