Something More [NOOK Book]

Overview

From New York Times bestselling author Janet Dailey comes a captivating story of a man who's given up, a woman who won't let go, and a race to find a treasure that could bring them wealth and so much more.



Something More



Life in Glory, Wyoming, population fifty-one, isn't exactly exciting. The dusty old town isn't even on the map. And ...

See more details below
Something More

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK
  • NOOK HD/HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK for Web

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook)
$10.49
BN.com price
(Save 40%)$17.60 List Price

Overview

From New York Times bestselling author Janet Dailey comes a captivating story of a man who's given up, a woman who won't let go, and a race to find a treasure that could bring them wealth and so much more.



Something More



Life in Glory, Wyoming, population fifty-one, isn't exactly exciting. The dusty old town isn't even on the map. And for rancher Luke McCallister, that's just fine. Broken by tragedy, the stoic cowboy spends his time at his Ten Bar Ranch or down at Ima Jane's Rimrock Bar, trying to avoid the gossip being served along with the food and drink. But the everyday quiet of his life is shattered when he finds a human skull-and possibly the key to Glory's oldest mystery.


It was one hundred years ago that a band of outlaws were said to have buried their gold in Glory. The one surviving bandit took the secret of the treasure's hiding place with him to the gallows. Angie Sommers knows the story cold: that man was her great-great-grandfather. She's come to Glory to see if the old legend of the gold is true, and she wants Luke to help her find it. She even has incentive: a possible clue written by the dead man himself.


Luke has no interest in chasing after pipe dreams. He's seen the damage too much hope can bring. Still, he can't deny that Angie makes him feel things he hasn't allowed himself to feel in years. Something about her sweet, trusting nature, her honest eyes, and unshakable belief makes him feel alive again-and that could be dangerous. For someone else is determined to stop Angie, someone who would do anything for the outlaws'gold. Now, bound by the thinnest of ties and shadowed by danger, Luke and Angie set off in search of a mystery as romantic as the west itself on a journey of faith that will take them into Wyoming's rugged, treacherous terrain and even deeper into the heart's tender graces.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly

Known for her popular Calder saga set in Montana (Calder Storm, etc.), Dailey turns her attention to the Ten Bar Ranch, near Glory, Wyo. (pop. 51), run by a young, laid-back widower, Luke McCallister. Still grieving over losing his family four years earlier, Luke, who swigs whiskey to dull the pain, isn't particularly rattled when a skeleton turns up on his property. He is surprised, however, by his attraction to redheaded Angie Sommers, an Iowa school teacher who comes to Glory after being notified that the remains appear to be of Henry James Wilson, her long missing grandfather. Henry James's grandfather was Ike Wilson, a train robber executed on the gallows: the skeleton's presence on Luke's land suggests that Ike's missing treasure may be there, too. Saddlebags Smith, a local gold-hunting eccentric, warns the two that "lookin' for that gold will make you crazy," while Luke's ranch hands and another townie complicate matters. Veteran tale-spinner Dailey depicts ranching life with a sure-handed, affectionate humor. (July)

Copyright 2007 Reed Business Information
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780758264411
  • Publisher: Kensington Publishing Corporation
  • Publication date: 7/1/2007
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 320
  • Sales rank: 276,327
  • File size: 528 KB

Meet the Author


Janet Dailey has written more than one hundred novels, with 300 million copies of her books sold in nineteen languages in ninety-eight countries.

Renée Raudman is a multi-award-winning audiobook narrator and actor. A multiple Audie Award nominee, she has earned a number of AudioFile Earphones Awards, and her narration of Homer's Odyssey by Gwen Cooper was selected by Library Journal as one of the best audiobooks of 2009.

Read More Show Less

Read an Excerpt

SOMETHING MORE


By JANET DAILEY

KENSINGTON BOOKS

Copyright © 2007 Janet Dailey
All right reserved.

ISBN: 978-0-7582-2388-3


Chapter One

A steady drizzle fell from the blanketing clouds, graying the Wyoming landscape and obscuring the bigness of it. The first pale shoots of the country's famed green grass poked their heads through the wet mire underfoot. But Luke McCallister paid no attention to their promise of new life as he rode over the ground, his wide shoulders hunched against the slow-falling rain.

The yellow slicker he wore kept out the wetness, but it offered little protection against the morning's damp chill, which invaded his bones and added a new element to the dully pounding hangover that made him feel much older than his thirty-eight years.

Each stride of his horse jarred his head; each creak of saddle leather and bawl of a calf resounded in his ears with the loudness of clanging cymbals, drawing involuntary winces. But his blue-gray gaze remained fixed on the dark, shiny rumps of the Black Baldie cows, all with calves sporting fresh Ten Bar brands on their hips, directly ahead of him.

Luke McCallister would have been the first to admit it was lousy weather to be moving a herd of cattle. But with the spring branding finished, the time had come to move the herd to spring pasture.

On a ranch the size of the Ten Bar, it wasn't a job to be postponed because of a little rain coming down. Fortunately for Luke it was a mindless task, one that required little inthe way of concentration.

To a stranger, there was little about Luke McCallister that would have set him apart from the half dozen riders pushing the herd. He had the tall, rangy look of an ordinary cowboy, broad shouldered and narrow hipped from a lifetime in the saddle. There was a triangular shape to his face, sun-browned skin stretched taut over hard, chiseled bone. Laugh lines cut parenthetical grooves on either side of his mouth and creased the corners of his eyes, the faded gray-blue of worn Levi's.

At the moment, he looked a bit worse for wear from a little too much Wild Turkey the night before. For those who knew him, like young Ten Bar ranch hand Tobe West, that was a typical state for Luke, too common to rate any notice.

Luke was easily the last person a passerby would have guessed to be the one who held the reins to the famed Ten Bar Ranch, one of the oldest in Wyoming. Back in the glory days of the old cattle barons, the Ten Bar had laid claim to over a million acres. But time and taxes had whittled its size to a mere 350,000. But it was all prime cattle country, rugged and vast, a land of rimrock and wide draws with native grasses growing belly deep on its tabletop buttes and sheltered basins.

Located in the sparsely populated eastern side of Wyoming, its broken terrain was part of the bridge between the towering mountains of the Rockies and the rolling sweep of the Great Plains. Cottonwood trees grew along the draws watered by the mountain snowmelts, and lodgepole pines studded the higher slopes of its boulder-strewn hills. But always there was grass, vibrantly green in the spring, tawny yellow in the summer, sun-cured brown in the fall, before the white of winter snows settled onto it.

On a clear day, it was a land of long vistas, the kind that excited the imagination and conjured up memories of the time when Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid had ridden over this range en route to their Hole in the Wall hideout roughly a day's ride away.

But the shrouding drizzle evoked no such scenes to stimulate the mind. All was veiled in the gray mist that melded sky and land. The cattle plodded through it, mud squishing and sucking at their cloven hooves, as they strung out in a long, black line meandering in the general direction of the distant pasture gate, pushed by the flanking riders while Tobe West and Luke McCallister brought up the rear.

Ahead on the left, the crooked shape of a bent pine tree jutted from behind a dark boulder. Luke stared at it for a long minute before the significance of the landmark registered. It was time to swing the cattle up the draw toward the gate.

He puckered his lips to whistle a shrill signal to the lead riders. But his mouth was dry as cotton, and the sound that came out was barely more than a loud hiss, loud enough to startle Tobe's horse.

"What the heck was that?" Tobe shot him a questioning look.

"Me." Luke managed a wry grin. "I was trying to signal them to make the turn."

"That's the weakest excuse for a whistle I ever heard." The sparkle of laughter was in Tobe's eyes, bright with shared amusement.

"It was kinda pathetic," Luke agreed with a smile, and thought about giving it another try but couldn't summon the energy. "I guess you'd better do it, Tobe. And while you're at it, send Mark ahead to open the gate."

Tobe nodded and pursed his lips, emitting an ear-splitting whistle that jolted Luke all the way to his toes and drew an involuntary groan from him at the new hammering it set off in his head. When one of the lead riders pulled up, Tobe passed on Luke's orders with a combination of hand signals and a ringing shout.

Wincing anew, Luke muttered without rancor, "Has anybody ever told you that you've got a voice with the clang of a church bell, Tobe?"

"In weather like this, that's what a man needs," Tobe retorted, then flashed him a wicked grin. "Jarred your head a bit, did it?"

"About as bad as a sledgehammer would," Luke admitted, his temples still throbbing from the effects of it.

Up ahead, Mark Cranston, the son of a neighboring rancher hired on as temporary roundup help, reined his horse away from the herd and spurred it toward the pasture gate, out of sight beyond the next fold in the hills. Meanwhile, the riders on the right flank pressed the leaders, turning them up the draw.

Luke watched as the black line of cattle curved in the right direction, briefly prodded out of their walk into a slow jog. Luke's own horse picked up its pace, crowding the stragglers at the rear.

"Not much farther now," Tobe observed.

"Can't come soon enough for me," Luke replied, conscious of the steady drip of water rolling off his hat and the spreading chill that numbed his fingers.

"Me either." Twenty-one-year-old Tobe West snatched another glance at Luke, the man who was both his boss and his idol.

From the time he had stuck his feet in his first pair of Justin boots, Tobe had wanted to be a full-fledged cowboy, even dreamed of owning his own ranch someday, something bigger than the measly eighty acres his pa rented. Growing up, he'd always had a horse to ride, and his pa had always kept a few steer on the eighty, enough for Tobe to practice his roping and play at being a cowboy.

He was only fifteen when his pa got killed in a car wreck. They had continued to rent the old Trevor place and Tobe had kept his horse, but they hadn't run any more cattle. The closest he had come to cowboying after that had been day work at local ranches, but those jobs had rarely amounted to more than a week or two a year.

Then, three years ago, his mother had died of cancer, leaving Tobe with a younger sister to raise and no money. Jobs in Glory, Wyoming, were about as scarce as rain during a drought. He'd been washing dishes at Ima Jane's Rimrock Bar & Grill when Luke McCallister had come in one night for supper and stayed for a few drinks.

At some point Luke had said something to Tobe; two seconds later, Tobe had started pouring out all his troubles to him, bemoaning the responsibility of his little sister and the cowboy life that would never be his. Right then and there, Luke had offered him a job and a place for him and his sister to live at the Ten Bar.

Truthfully, Tobe had been half afraid that Luke had been too drunk to know what he was saying. But his fears had been groundless. He had a home and a job at the Ten Bar.

Some people thought Luke drank too much. But Tobe didn't see it that way. Besides, it wasn't like Luke got mean when he drank; he got loopy and a bit irreverent. In Tobe's book that was harmless.

"Yessiree," Tobe continued, "the cab of that pickup is gonna seem warm and dry after the wet deck of this horse. I can't crawl into it soon enough to suit me." He slapped a length of wet rope against his rain-slicked chaps to hurry along a lagging cow with her calf.

"It's a cup of steaming hot coffee I want to wrap my hands around," Luke countered, thinking of the thermos waiting for him in the truck, filled with coffee laced with a liberal amount of the hair of the dog that bit him. Or in this case, turkey.

Tobe threw him a smiling glance, striving for a man-to-man air. "Don't drink it all. As cold and damp as I feel, I could use some of that special brew of yours."

"I'll-" Luke never got the rest of his sentence out as a calf bawled in sudden panic and the middle of the herd veered wildly away from a stand of cottonwood trees growing along the draw. A split second later, Luke spotted the culprit, as a spindly-legged man in a voluminous black coat charged out of the trees, flapping his arms like a scarecrow to scatter the black cows.

"Who the heck-" Tobe sputtered.

"Take a wild guess," Luke murmured in mild annoyance, as the flankers worked to settle the herd back into line again and give the man on foot a wide berth. "That crazy old Saddlebags Smith is back again." His disgust gave way to amusement as he eyed the woolly-bearded man in the floppy hat. "You'd think after all these years of looking for that outlaw gold and coming up empty, he would give it up as a lost cause."

"Not him." The young cowboy threw an exasperated glare at the old man. "He'll die lookin' for it." Satisfied that the cattle weren't going to invade his little area under the cottonwoods, the geriatric treasure hunter sifted back beneath their branches to stand guard. "Do you suppose he thinks that gold is buried in those trees?" Tobe wondered, his interest momentarily piqued.

"Who knows?" Luke lifted his shoulders in a disinterested shrug, then idly ran a glance over the small cluster of cottonwoods. "It doesn't seem likely to me. Those trees are younger than he is."

Startled by the comment, Tobe examined the grove again, then hid his chagrin by scoffing, "Just about everything is younger than that old coot." A contemplative quality entered his expression. "When we didn't see hide nor hair of him during calving time, I thought he'd probably kicked the bucket this winter."

"I wouldn't have been surprised." But truthfully Luke hadn't given the old man much thought.

It wasn't that unusual for Saddlebags not to be seen. In fact, an actual sighting of him was rare. Sometimes a rider might come across an old camp or catch sight of a narrow shadow flitting among the rocks, but that was about it. Every once in a while-like now-somebody would come up on him.

"Where do you suppose he goes in the winter?" A frown puckered Tobe's forehead.

Such speculation would require more effort than Luke's fragile head wanted to exert. He settled for hearsay. "Tip Connors claims to have seen him in Cheyenne."

"But how would he get there?" Tobe persisted. "He doesn't have a truck, no means of transportation."

"He probably thumbed a ride."

"Maybe," the young cowboy conceded. "But I can't imagine anybody givin' that old codger a ride. He'd stink up a truck worse than last year's dirty underwear." He grimaced at the thought, then frowned again. "I never understood why you let him grub around this place. You should chase him off the Ten Bar."

Luke just smiled. "Saddlebags is harmless."

The moniker came from the two sacks, bulging with the whole of his worldly belongings, that the old man carried slung over his shoulder like a saddlebag. His rightful name, according to his identification papers, was Amos Aloysius Smith, formerly of Kansas City, Missouri. As suspicious as Smith sounded, the Amos Aloysius part had a definite ring of truth to it. It was hardly the kind of name someone would make up.

According to Ima Jane Evans, bar owner and local authority on everyone within a hundred miles, Saddlebags Smith had no family-or any criminal record, for that matter. He didn't smoke, drink, or swear. Rumor had it that he was a mute, but Ima Jane insisted he could talk if he was so inclined, although Luke couldn't recall ever hearing a single word pass from the old man's lips.

"Harmless, he may be," Tobe declared, "but he's still a nuisance, always poking around and digging holes. It used to be he'd fill them back in, but not anymore. Now he just leaves 'em for some cow to stumble into and break a leg."

"He's getting old." Luke knew the feeling. And each breath of the chill, damp air intensified it.

"Old!" Tobe snorted a laugh. "Ancient is more like it. Why, he must be eighty if he's a day."

"Probably. I know he's been roaming the Ten Bar since before I was born."

Over the years, Saddlebags Smith had become almost as big a legend as the story of the buried gold itself. No one knew anymore exactly how much had been stolen by the outlaws who had robbed a train all those years ago-and found themselves with more loot than their horses could carry. One source had put the figure at a quarter million; another had claimed a hundred thousand in gold bars. Given the penchant for exaggeration in such tales, Luke had always figured it was probably much lower.

According to legend, a posse had caught up with the bandits two days later, but the gold was never found. The one surviving outlaw had taken the secret of its hiding place with him to the gallows.

"When you get right down to it, it doesn't matter. It may be nothing but a wild-goose chase, but at least he has a reason to wake up in the morning." There was a hint of envy in his eyes when Luke glanced at the dark, narrow shape among the tree trunks.

For himself, the dawn of a new day was an empty thing that he usually poured whiskey in to cut the bitter taste. It was a bleak fact, one he didn't care to face without a bottle of Wild Turkey at hand.

"Let's get these cattle moving," he said with a rare show of ill temper. "We keep poking along like this, it'll take all day."

He jabbed his horse with a spur, sending the animal lunging toward the closest cow. Immediately the straggler broke into a trot and crowded the ones in front of it. The sudden insistence on haste created confusion. Separated from its momma, a calf planted its feet and bawled in protest, then took off like a shot when Luke reined his horse toward it.

Passing wide of the cottonwoods, the tail end of the herd began the gradual climb out of the draw. It was slick going, traveling over muddy ground chewed up by previous hooves. Of their own accord, the straggling cows with their calves spread out seeking firmer footing.

When one pair ducked back toward the draw, Luke automatically sent his horse after it, gritting his teeth against the jarring his head took. Finally turning the cow and calf, he herded them back toward the others. But the angle of climb was steeper, with sections of the slope eroded to expose dark banks of undercut soil. They began the scrambling climb up the slope, hooves digging for purchase.

Suddenly Luke felt the horse falling from beneath him as a whole chunk of ground gave way under them. Instinct alone warned him that the horse was going over backward. The remnants of a hangover dulled his reflexes, making him a split-second slow to dive off the uphill side of the saddle.

A wildly flailing hoof dealt him a glancing blow an instant before he went headfirst into the muddy bank. The softness of the sodden dirt cushioned much of the impact as he more or less skidded to a halt, the horse crashing to the ground below him.

Something clunked him in the head, knocking off his hat and coming to a rest atop an outstretched arm. He lay there for a dazed second, conscious of the cold, wet mud beneath him and the misty rain on his cheek. For a moment, Luke felt too tired and sore to move. But already his horse was clambering to its feet, giving itself a head-to-tail shake that sent the empty stirrups flopping. The slip and slide of another set of hooves signaled the arrival of Tobe West on the scene. "Luke? Are you okay?"

(Continues...)



Excerpted from SOMETHING MORE by JANET DAILEY Copyright © 2007 by Janet Dailey. Excerpted by permission.
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 3.5
( 7 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(2)

4 Star

(2)

3 Star

(1)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(2)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing all of 7 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 7, 2009

    Boring Waste of Time

    I am completely mystified that this book got four stars by some people. It is honestly the worst romance novel I have read in a very long time. It barely qualifies as a romance. The hero and heroine kiss only twice and in the same scene! Sex isn't mentioned, let alone even implied. This book could be rated G. I have read textbooks that are more romantic than this.

    Also, the characters are boring. This fact is made worse by the fact that they have potential. Luke has a tragic past that causes him to drink. Not that this is explored in any kind of meaningful way. No, he just kind of acts like a dick. I can't even see why the heroine likes him. The heroine, Angie, is just plain boring. Her past (ancestor stole some gold) is not explored in any kind of meaningful detail either. She nice enough I guess. The hero and heroine are attracted to each other, but this is done with zero finesse on the part of Dailey. The comments about their attraction are awkward and feel forced. Like she was writing a normal novel and though "oh, I should probably add some kind of romance to this, or something." The secondary characters could be interesting. There is a little girl who lives on Luke's ranch with her brother that I liked. Honestly, she was my favorite character. She had some potential too. And her relationship with Angie was WAY more interesting that Luke's relationship with Angie. And Luke is mean to poor little Dulcie. I could understand if he ignored her because of the pain of losing his own child, but no. He's just kind of a dick.

    Also, the plot is boring. They're looking for some missing gold that was hidden along time ago. Wheee... The only reason this seems like it would work is because it's supposed to be a romance. They're camping alone together in the Wyoming wilderness, looking for lost gold. COME ON! How Dailey only got two KISSES out of this set up is ridiculous, and I would be so bold as to say it's border-line CRIMINAL. Wyoming is very romantic. Alone. WILDERNESS. Wild animals! Luke feeling desire for a woman for the first time since his wife's death. GOD. It's like Dailey has never read a romance novel before, let alone written one! The plot "twist" is also boring and contrived. Totally predictable and the characters are just plain stupid about finding the gold.

    All in all, this was a waste of money and I wish I could return it. I have never bought a Janet Dailey book before, and I never will again. I usually give authors at least two books before final judgment is passed, but not this time. That's how stupid I thought this book was. I guess I should have realized it when I was more than a hundred pages in and not a single kiss or anything REMOTELY untoward had happened. And it's a contemporary! Sheesh. Honestly, I could rant for days about how frustrating this book was. DO NOT BUY IT!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted September 22, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    Loved It!!

    This is a good read....lots of action and leaves you wondering "who done it" through most of the book. Very touching in the way they have all come together. Long lasting respect of family and friends. Cannot wait for another book from Janet Dailey!!!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 30, 2009

    Not worth the the time

    I usually love books by Janet Daily, but this was one of the worst books I have ever read. I kept on reading thinking it was going to get better, it never did.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 19, 2009

    I Also Recommend:

    Good read

    Janet Dailey ran out of characters with her Calder books and this gives her scope for another saga that could proove to be equally entralling.<BR/>The plot is pretty good and the charactiers can each hold further investigation in later books. Great for a rainey day. Luke has a chip on his shoulder and run down ranch, which comes with and a bunch of "workers" who, some say, are free loading on his good nature. Angie is looking for info, on her grandfather, who stopped by the ranch many years ago, and never came home. It involves a train robbery and hidden gold which lends for a great yarn.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 14, 2008

    Left Wanting More

    I enjoyed this book for its characters. All strong, some too predictable, but overall much as people are today. I would like to see a series of books related to this story to tie up some of the ends that were left dangling at the end of the book. Do Luke and Angie get together, what happens when she takes her grandfather home, what happens to Tobe and Dulcie, as well as Fargo, Griff and Ima Jane?

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 29, 2008

    A reviewer

    Janet Dailey writes with her old style born out of the cleverness of the successful Calder books. This follows a similar vein with all the Calder books style but here she has all new characters

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 12, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing all of 7 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)