Something Old

( 5 )

Overview

Travel to Plain City, Ohio, to witness the Mennonite and English culture clash. As Katy Yoder accepts a new job and struggles to define her place in the world, childhood friends and a past romance get in the way. Even when her friends try to help her change her judgmental attitude, Katy is certain that seeing things as black and white is the only way to please God. But as love softens her heart, slowly shades of gray seep into her world, and she discovers the right answer isn’t ...

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Overview

Travel to Plain City, Ohio, to witness the Mennonite and English culture clash. As Katy Yoder accepts a new job and struggles to define her place in the world, childhood friends and a past romance get in the way. Even when her friends try to help her change her judgmental attitude, Katy is certain that seeing things as black and white is the only way to please God. But as love softens her heart, slowly shades of gray seep into her world, and she discovers the right answer isn’t always the easiest one.

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Barbour taps into the Amish fiction fan base by offering an Anabaptist series, the Plain City Bridesmaids. Christner, raised in the Ohio Mennonite Church, introduces Katy Yoder—who's not Amish despite the name—a young woman seeking to follow God as she interacts with the "outsiders" for whom she works. Katy's heart remains closed to Jake Byler, the young man she once loved but who has returned home as "spoiled goods." Her rigid world begins to waver as she faces temptations from the outside world, her feelings for Jake revive, and she confronts issues such as head coverings, cellphones, and the Internet. But it isn't until Jake accuses her of "living your self-righteous life" that she begins to see her life as more than a set of rules. The book offers an interesting look at Mennonite struggles, with cleaning tips and home remedies included, but the plot plods and the writing stutters through stilted dialogue.. (Aug.)
RT Book Reviews

Christner has written a novel about the Mennonites that is rich in detail without being overbearing. The characters are well written and believable. The main female character is unsympathetic at times, but redeems herself in the end.

— Patsy Glans

Tammy's Book Parlor

This is a "different" kind of read ---- mixing the Mennonite, Amish and English together bring us a true to life read! Throughout the story, Katie keeps a journal of cleaning tips and recipes, hand cream remedies, other recipes, and spiritual insights. Her journal is shared at the end of the book. If you''re a fan of Amish or Mennonite inspirational romances, don''t miss this light, fun read! Great for summertime reading enjoyment!

— Tammy Griffin

Fresh Fiction

Dianne Christner has written a lovely Mennonite romance, presenting some of the struggles that their young people go through in remaining close to their faith, families and community. The story gives some real introspect into how they view themselves and outsiders. The main character, Katy Yoder, has chosen to be a housekeeper as her profession. Throughout the story, she keeps a journal of cleaning tips and recipes, hand cream remedies and their recipes, and spiritual insights. Her journal is shared at the end of the book. If you''re a fan of Amish or Mennonite inspirational romances, you''ll really enjoy this one.

— Viki Ferrell

Tillie Nutter

Here''s a little secret. I typically cannot make it through Mennonite fiction. Y''all know I adore Amish fiction, but the mennonite ones don''t grab me…I miss the buggies, the lack of electricity, the plainness that the Amish provide. With that said, this book had me from nearly the beginning (it didn''t instantly grab me, but about a quarter of the way in I started loving it). The main character, Katy, had such an amazing transformation in this book. I loved her character development. She grew so much and I felt like I was growing along with her. There were a few parts that were a little flat, but the book had such a great payoff in the end for me.

The Readers Roundtable Inspirational Moments

Fans of contemporary Inspirational fiction will enjoy Something Old. The characters are well-developed and for the most part, likable and sympathetic. Dianne Christner delivers many valuable lessons of faith that transcend specific religious boundaries. Katy’s love story and journey make for a truly delightful read.

— Kathy Branfield

CBA Retailers

Readers will appreciate Katy''s struggle to remain firm in her faith in a world blatantly opposed to God''s standards. Choosing to please God by loving others is neither plain or simple.

— Kim Peterson

RT Book Reviews - Patsy Glans

Christner has written a novel about the Mennonites that is rich in detail without being overbearing. The characters are well written and believable. The main female character is unsympathetic at times, but redeems herself in the end.
The Readers Roundtable Inspirational Moments - Kathy Branfield

Fans of contemporary Inspirational fiction will enjoy Something Old. The characters are well-developed and for the most part, likable and sympathetic. Dianne Christner delivers many valuable lessons of faith that transcend specific religious boundaries. Katy’s love story and journey make for a truly delightful read.
Fresh Fiction

Dianne Christner has written a lovely Mennonite romance, presenting some of the struggles that their young people go through in remaining close to their faith, families and community. The story gives some real introspect into how they view themselves and outsiders. The main character, Katy Yoder, has chosen to be a housekeeper as her profession. Throughout the story, she keeps a journal of cleaning tips and recipes, hand cream remedies and their recipes, and spiritual insights. Her journal is shared at the end of the book. If you're a fan of Amish or Mennonite inspirational romances, you'll really enjoy this one.

— Viki Ferrell

Tammy's Book Parlor

This is a "different" kind of read ---- mixing the Mennonite, Amish and English together bring us a true to life read! Throughout the story, Katie keeps a journal of cleaning tips and recipes, hand cream remedies, other recipes, and spiritual insights. Her journal is shared at the end of the book. If you're a fan of Amish or Mennonite inspirational romances, don't miss this light, fun read! Great for summertime reading enjoyment!

— Tammy Griffin

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781616262310
  • Publisher: Barbour Publishing, Incorporated
  • Publication date: 8/1/2011
  • Series: The Plain City Bridesmaids
  • Edition description: Original
  • Pages: 320
  • Sales rank: 1,400,221
  • Product dimensions: 5.50 (w) x 8.30 (h) x 0.90 (d)

Meet the Author

Dianne Christner’s first book was published in 1994, and she now writes full time. She has written several historical fiction titles and has started writing contemporary fiction from her experience of being raised in the Mennonite church. Dianne lives in Phoenix, Arizona, where she enjoys the beauty of her desert surroundings and life sizzles in the summer when temperatures soar above 100 degrees. Dianne and her husband have two married children and five grandchildren.

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 5 )
Rating Distribution

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(4)

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Sort by: Showing all of 5 Customer Reviews
  • Posted November 13, 2011

    An Enjoyable Amish Read

    Katy Yoder is 19 and doesn¿t date anyone because of the heartbreak she experienced with Jake Byler joined the Englisch world, meeting worldly girls and doing things she doesn¿t approve of. Their last time together, Jake was drunk and pushed himself on her, so she has hated his since. But she still just can¿t get over him enough to date anyone else. But what a surprise she gets when Jake shows back up in town, and it seems like everywhere she goes, he is there. Not only that, everything she is involved in, Jake is involved in it too. She just can¿t shake loose of him. All she was interested in now was moving in with her childhood friends for a while. Jake Byler¿s life changed while he was away and he wants to come back to the church and try to win his only love Katy back. But this will be a challenge because of her hatred and bitterness over him leaving her. I enjoyed this Mennonite story as I met Katy and her best friends Megan and Lil, and was in on the excitement of their moving in with each other. The author created a cast of characters that played their parts so well in the story and it was fun getting to know them, even though at times some of them were irritating. The main character Katy sometimes acted like goodie-two-shoes because she was always judging others. And Lil really got on my nerves when she was trying to nose into Katy¿s life, pushing her to go back with Jake. I wanted to scream at her sometimes and tell her to tend to her own business. At first I didn¿t like Jake, but as I got to know him, I really liked him because he was real. He had accepted the Lord and his life had definitely changed for the better. And David, well I couldn¿t figure out if he really liked Katy or he was just being a jerk because Katy¿s dad kinda forced her to go on three dates with David. And then he was so jealous of Jake, but that could have just been a male thing, right? I was proud of Jake for finally speaking up to Katy about her attitude, she really had that coming. Over all this was an enjoyable read and I hope there is a second book to follow these characters further in their lives. Though I do think this could be a YA book too, it just seems like something younger people would enjoy reading. Which is a good thing, we need more YA books! I encourage you to grab a copy of this book, read and enjoy it. You will not be disappointed.

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  • Posted September 6, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    Wonderful Plain Story

    I enjoyed this book! The story is about young Katie Yoder a Mennonite woman, who wants to move in with some of her friends. One of her friends is cousins with Katie's old love Jake Byler, and she doesn't like Lil interfering in her life. Lil has been helping Jake by putting them together.
    Jake had gone kind of wild and Katie fears that he had a fling with Jessie. What brings this all together is some of the changes that are happening at their more conservative Mennonite Church.
    Katie holds on to old hurts, and feels she has given forgiveness to people. She has also been judging others, because they don't hold on to her strict beliefs.
    The messages given are some that we all need to follow. Love the compassion show to Jake's elderly Grandmother, there are a few chuckles and a few tense moments.
    All in all I enjoyed this quick read book. Loose yourself in a good pace book!

    I was provided with a copy of this book by Barbour Publishing, and was not required to give a positive review!

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  • Posted August 7, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    Complicated Characters!

    "Katy Yoder lives a simple, sheltered lifestyle ensconced in the traditions of the Conservative Mennonite church and holds a naive black-and-white worldview." - Back Cover

    At first, the prologue held my attention with some difficulty. Then, the story grabbed hold of me and I finished the book in about two days. The characters fascinated me, especially Katy Yoder.

    I could relate to Katy. She holds very tightly to tradition and to her prayer kapp. Her worldview is indeed black-and-white with very little grace. In typical story formula, the woman is always right in women's fiction and the men are wrong. In Amish fiction, I normally see the men and women portrayed very chaste-like. However, Dianne Christner spins the story that seems a cross between women's romance and Christian romance. I might even tip-toe over to edgy (though I really hate that word). It's edgy in a good way.

    Katy notices Jake's tight jeans and how the tool belt hangs over his waist. There's a physical tension between Katy and Jake complicated only by her own predjudices against him for mistreating her years before. Her father disapproves of Jake. He thinks Jake is wild still and wants Katy to date David as a condition to her moving out on her own with her two best friends. The book becomes quite complicated. The reader can relate to the characters; at least, I can.

    Right away, Katy's black-and-white way of seeing things, her quickness to judge and her lack of grace eventually come out in the book making for an interesting plot as quickly Jake becomes the good guy and Katy the self-righteous and overly pious wrong one. Christner manages to keep the reader totally connected to the characters in spite of the role switching. In the end, I see how the prologue was very necessary. It's not just a romance story, but a story about friendship, family and traditions. It digs into the controversial issue of the prayer kapp.

    All in all, I give it five stars! A friend is borrowing the book, but I am keeping it in my permanent library.

    Book was given by the publisher to review.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 22, 2011

    Great Read!! My favorite Amish fiction!

    I love the heroine of this book and her relationship with her girlfriedns. I really enjoyed reading about the Amish doddy house. I grew up Mennonite and thought Christner gave an authentic look at the Mennonite faith. I would recommend this book and I'm looking forward to reading the rest of the series!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 24, 2013

    No text was provided for this review.

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