Something to Die For

Overview

It is a bloody game as old as nations and politics. And it has always been played with the lives of the most loyal and brave.

Colonel "Wild Bill" Fogarty has been a dedicated soldier for most of his adult life -- an able warrior who was bloodied but survived the folly called Vietnam. Now short-sighted policy-makers in Washington are manufacturing another little war for questionable purposes, gambling with human lives in cut-throat game of power, greed, and personal ambition. ...

See more details below
Available through our Marketplace sellers.
Other sellers (Hardcover)
  • All (102) from $1.99   
  • New (2) from $15.50   
  • Used (100) from $1.99   
Close
Sort by
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Note: Marketplace items are not eligible for any BN.com coupons and promotions
$15.50
Seller since 2014

Feedback rating:

(92)

Condition:

New — never opened or used in original packaging.

Like New — packaging may have been opened. A "Like New" item is suitable to give as a gift.

Very Good — may have minor signs of wear on packaging but item works perfectly and has no damage.

Good — item is in good condition but packaging may have signs of shelf wear/aging or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Acceptable — item is in working order but may show signs of wear such as scratches or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Used — An item that has been opened and may show signs of wear. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Refurbished — A used item that has been renewed or updated and verified to be in proper working condition. Not necessarily completed by the original manufacturer.

New
Fast Shipping.Ships USPS. All orders that are priority, first class, or over $20 will have tracking information provided. Will ship standard, expedited, and internationally

Ships from: El Dorado, CA

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
$50.00
Seller since 2014

Feedback rating:

(136)

Condition: New
Brand new.

Ships from: acton, MA

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Close
Sort by
Sending request ...

Overview

It is a bloody game as old as nations and politics. And it has always been played with the lives of the most loyal and brave.

Colonel "Wild Bill" Fogarty has been a dedicated soldier for most of his adult life -- an able warrior who was bloodied but survived the folly called Vietnam. Now short-sighted policy-makers in Washington are manufacturing another little war for questionable purposes, gambling with human lives in cut-throat game of power, greed, and personal ambition. "Wild Bill" has seen too many young men destroyed in pursuit of shadow causes. But it is not his role to question, simply to serve--no matter where or for what reasons...no matter who has to die.

From bestselling author, decorated Vietnam veteran and former Secretary of the Navy James Webb comes a blisteringly authentic novel of the ruthless politics of war -- a searing indictment of those at the top who dictate military policy...and a moving tribute to the courageous soldiers who must pay the ultimate price.It is a bloody game as old as nations and politics. And it has always been played with the lives of the most loyal and brave.

It is a bloody game as old as nations and politics. And it has always been played with the lives of the most loyal and brave.

Colonel "Wild Bill" Fogarty has been a dedicated soldier for most of his adult life---an able warrior who was bloodied but survived the folly called Vietnam. Now short-sighted policy-makers in Washington are manufacturing another little war for questionable purposes, gambling with human lives in cut-throat game of power, greed, and personal ambition. "Wild Bill" has seen too many young men destroyed in pursuitof shadow causes. But it is not his role to question, simply to serve---no matter where or for what reasons...no matter who has to die.

From bestselling author, decorated Vietnam veteran and former Secretary of the Navy JAMES WEBB comes a blisteringly authentic novel of the ruthless politics of war---a searing indictment of those at the top who dictate military policy...and a moving tribute to the courageous soldiers who must pay the ultimate price.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
After a Japanese corporation sells vital U.S. defense technology to the Soviets, congressman Doc Rowland demands an apology and reparations from the Japanese government. Secretary of State Ron Holcomb, attempting to shift public attention from a gesture he regards as quixotic in the face of Japan's economic leverage, conspires with the glory-hungry admiral ``Mad Dog'' Mulchahy to land Marines in Africa, intervening in an obscure regional conflict that nevertheless offers Americans ``something to die for.'' As combat veteran and former assistant secretary of defense, Webb ( Fields of Fire ) uses firsthand experience to make both his battlefield and political scenes immediate and realistic. His characters are well drawn, with sexual rivalry between Rowland and Holcomb adding a personal dimension to their conflict. The surprise ending supplies a grim reminder that even with Russia's apparent collapse there remain many ways of waging war, and many possible enemies--not all of them obvious. BOMC alternate; author tour. (Feb.)
School Library Journal
YA --An exciting and timely novel that reads like today's headlines. Webb's narrative takes time to develop, but becomes absorbing in the second half as he paints a convincing picture of power politics in Washington and shows the impact of these struggles on U. S. military strategy in the Third World. He deftly describes war from a warrior's perspective--from the exhilaration of impending action to the despair over fallen comrades. What's more, he has gone to great pains to ensure that civilian readers are neither exasperated with jargon nor bewildered by tactics or equipment. On the contrary, his accounts of action in the Eritrean Desert by Cuban, French, Ethiopian, and American troops are compelling and readily comprehensible.-- Nick Vaux, Jefferson Sci-Tech, Alexandria, VA
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780688101213
  • Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers
  • Publication date: 2/1/1991
  • Edition description: 1st ed
  • Pages: 320

Meet the Author

James Webb is a decorated Vietnam War veteran, former U.S. Secretary of the Navy, and bestselling author of Fields of Fire and The Emperor's General.
Read More Show Less

Read an Excerpt

Chapter One

Washington, D.C.

Washington is a town whose only industry is the making, shaping, processing, and marketing of words. Words to define how citizens should conduct themselves. Words to direct and limit industry. Words to calm friends and warn enemies.Words to throw at one another in the halls of Congress, or in front of devouring cameras. Words that in end can kill, or impoverish, or imprison, or empower also recycled words -- on editorial pages or inside the pages of legal briefs -- dissecting other words, assessing implications, making distinctions, arguing their true meaning as if the words were holy writ. Words without poetry or music, whose mastery brings money and authority.

And few had mastered this arcane industry as well as Ronald Holcomb, who at forty-six had become one of the youngest secretaries of defense in history. Physically small and unathletic, his ability to think and speak had always enlarged his presence. As a young boy at Andover preparatory school, Holcomb had learned their power, compensating for his small stature by negotiating his way out of confrontations. At Harvard he had led the debating team. At Cambridge he had mastered English literature. At Yale law school he had edited the law review. And in only twentyyears, he had talked and written his way from a position in the foreign service, to a key post on the National Security Council, to an undersecretaryship of state, and now to the head of the Defense Department. President Everett Lodge loved to hear Ron Holcomb talk. And more important, The President listened to what he said.

Today, as his black limousine drove past the historic buildings and widefields of the Mall, Holcomb silently rehearsed his lines from his place in the right rear seat of the car. He had two stops to make, and it was his mission to talk the President out of trouble.

Billy Parks, Holcomb's driver, slowed the large car and made a right turn off of Constitution Avenue. It was a steamy summer day, one that recalled Washington's original beginnings as a swamp. Across the street, young staffers and interns were calling to each other in the sultry morning air as they walked along the edges of the Russell Senate Office Building. As always in the summer, the town was filled with tourists. From the back seat, Holcomb had counted license plates from more than thirty different states on cars and vans as he made the journey from the Pentagon to the Capitol. Counting license plates was an old habit, designed by Holcomb's father when he was a child to strengthen his memory. And the young defense secretary had an unbeatable memory.

Parks turned on the flashing red light that was mounted on the dashboard, and slowly eased the limousine past concrete blockades that sealed off the Capitol parking lot. Before the days of terrorism, the lot had been an open thoroughfare named Capitol Street. A potbellied policeman in black trousers and a white shirt stepped out of a gate house and halted the limousine. He peered inside, checking them with a dark, emotionless face that had lost its capacity to trust. Parks turned off the siren light and showed him a government pass.

"Secretary of defense," said Parks. "Here to see the Senate majority leader."

The policeman allowed himself one more piercing look into each man's face, just to be sure. Finally, he pointed inside the lot, next to the Capitol itself. "Alright. Good morning, Mr. Secretary. Park over there"

Parks drove to a reserved area adjacent to the Senate chambers and halted the car. Holcomb stepped gingerly out of the right rear door, smoothing out the wrinkles in his suit and tamping down his hair just above the ears. His senior military assistant, Major General Bear Lazaretti, exited from the left. In a locked briefcase under his left arm, Lazaretti carried a sheaf of papers containing fact sheets and briefing materials.

Sid Rose, the assistant secretary of defense for legislative affairs, had been waiting for them. Now he strutted like a rooster toward the car and stood at the curb. Rose bounced on his toes, constantly scanning the sidewalks and waving to people as they passed: staffers, police officers, janitors, gawking tourists, it didn't matter. It seemed Sid Rose knew them all, and each one had a smile for him. Everybody was Sid Rose's best friend. Even Ronald Holcomb, who rarely thought in terms of friends.

Holcomb walked toward him and Rose took the secretary by the crook of one arm, an act that caused Holcomb to recoil slightly from the unpermitted familiarity. Rose noticed that, and in response became even more familiar. Rose couldn't help it. He was a creature of Capitol Hill. Touch and pat, slap and shake. Those were important tools in the business of seducing support from congressmen and others who lived in a world of shaky, constantly changing alliances.

"Hey, Ron! I really appreciate you coming over here this morning. It's the first time Joe Barksdale's even noticed we existed since June."

They walked under a concrete tunnel that was an extension of the building, and then through a side door, into the Senate side of the Capitol. The interior of the Capitol was dark and heavily ornate. With some modification, the building had served American legislators since 1800, with a few minor interruptions such as its burning by the British in 1814. High columns marked the hallways. Beautiful mosaics covered the towering ceilings. Patterned marble made the floors. There had been a time when this building alone had been the very power center of a small but vibrant nation. In the nineteenth century the entire Congress, as well as the Supreme Court, had met and kept their offices inside the central building.

Another policeman checked them at the door, and Rose steered Holcomb through a bustle of staffers and tourists toward a nearby elevator.

Something to Die For. Copyright © by James Webb. Reprinted by permission of HarperCollins Publishers, Inc. All rights reserved. Available now wherever books are sold.
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)