Sometimes Moon

Sometimes Moon

by Carole Lexa Schaefer, Pierr Morgan
     
 

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Sometimes Moon is full. Sometimes it is just a sliver of light. And sometimes Moon is not there at all.

When Selene looks up into the bright night sky, she sees a shining moon face that waxes and wanes. There’s Hiding Moon that’s shy and secret, Cheeky Moon that’s round and soft, and Treasure Moon that’s shiny as gold. With magic

Overview

Sometimes Moon is full. Sometimes it is just a sliver of light. And sometimes Moon is not there at all.

When Selene looks up into the bright night sky, she sees a shining moon face that waxes and wanes. There’s Hiding Moon that’s shy and secret, Cheeky Moon that’s round and soft, and Treasure Moon that’s shiny as gold. With magic and imagination, Sometimes Moon helps children understand the amazing faces and phases of our magnificent moon.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Fans of Schaefer and Morgan's elegant ode to imagination, The Squiggle, may be disappointed by this meandering text, which sacrifices the story to teach a lesson. Morgan's gouache illustrations, done on speckled, light-brown paper, strongly suggest an Ionian inspiration (as does the book's dedication): the characters wear heavy hand-knit sweaters, gentle turquoise and blue waves lap at a pebbled shore and fishing boats float in front of whitewashed homes. Yet the narrative never mentions the beguiling setting or the non-American village culture. Instead, the text offers a study in the phases of the moon (including a bland diagram on "How the Moon Waxes and Wanes") that inadvertently competes with the unexplained old world imagery. Selene, the girl narrator, learns about the changing moon from her grandfather. "Grandpapa says, `The moon waxes and wanes, waxes and wanes. Did you know?' I know. I always look out for Moon." She calls the half moon "Big Basket Moon" after her mother's half-circle knitting basket, and thinks of the waxing gibbous moon as "Cheeky Moon" because it looks like "Baby Nico's cheeks." Some of the images are framed in full-moon-like circles, and a rebus-like key to the phases of the moon appears at the bottom of some of the pages; but the visual cues, like the plot, are inconsistent. The story here is eclipsed by an uneasy mix of natural science, a child's imaginative musings and an exotic setting. Ages 5-8. (July) Copyright 1999 Cahners Business Information.
Children's Literature - Emily Schuster
As her family gathers for a "full moon family picnic," Selene recounts her own observations of her friend the moon. She always watches the phases of the moon, from the crescent, shaped like her grandfather's dory boat, to the full moon, shining like a bright piece of gold. The book evokes an image of a close family living on a Mediterranean island, as it beautifully outlines the phases of the moon. An addendum explaining the science of moon phases will be difficult for children to understand, but the book is fine without it. It gets the facts across, and much more poetically.
School Library Journal
PreS-Gr 2 Selene's fisherman Grandpapa tells her that "The moon waxes and wanes, wanes and waxes," and she observes and enjoys it in all its phases. There is, for example, Hiding Moon, up behind the shadows; Dory Boat Moon, the crescent "as thin and silver as Grandpapa's boat"; and the almost full orb, round as baby Nico's cheeks. Selene's wonder at the changing phases is described in simple images, combining the familiar constants of a small child's world with the evocation of night and moonlight. The illustrations fit perfectly with the text, showing a very real little girl, and her equally real white cat, in a seaside village. The art, gouache on a textured paper, is warm and solid; colored forms are set off by white borders that don't confine the adventurous cat or child. With two pages at the end that clearly explain and illustrate the phases of the moon, this is a good science book as well as an enjoyable story. Marian Drabkin, Richmond Public Library, CA Copyright 1999 Cahners Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
The joyful play of a child's imagination that was central to the author and illustrator's Squiggle (1996) only breaks through occasionally in this purposeful introduction to the phases of the moon. Full, new, and in-between, the moon is a constant companion for aptly named Selene, who gives the phases fanciful names while scolding it for disappearing, envisioning it as a basket to fill with yarn or as a cradle for Baby Nico, and encircling it with her arms on a "full moon picnic" with her family. Selene's Greek coastline is depicted in bright, pure colors; she radiates personality as a character, but the facial features are sometimes placed askew, hands inexpertly drawn, and figures oddly posed. A science lesson is grafted onto the end. So popular is the moon as a picture book topic that this is likely to be lost in the crowd behind Eric Carle's Papa, Please Get The Moon For Me (1986), Frank Asch's Moonbear series, and the plethora of easy nonfiction treatments. (Picture book. 5-7)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780440417392
Publisher:
Random House Children's Books
Publication date:
07/10/2001
Pages:
32
Product dimensions:
7.99(w) x 10.00(h) x 0.15(d)
Age Range:
5 - 8 Years

Meet the Author

Carole Lexa Schaefer and Pierr Morgan are longtime friends and collaborators. The Squiggle, their first book together for Crown, was an ALA Notable Book and a Booklist Editors' Choice. Both author and artist live and work in Seattle, Washington.

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