Somme 1 July 1916: Tragedy and Triumph

Somme 1 July 1916: Tragedy and Triumph

by Andrew Robertshaw, Peter Dennis
     
 

The first day of the Battle of the Somme of World War I (1914-1918) is still on record as having the largest number of deaths in any one day in any war. This book explores the myths of this infamous battle, and the use of mines, tunnels, gas and flame-throwers by the British in combination with innovative tactics such as smoke. Andrew Robertshaw analyses the first

Overview


The first day of the Battle of the Somme of World War I (1914-1918) is still on record as having the largest number of deaths in any one day in any war. This book explores the myths of this infamous battle, and the use of mines, tunnels, gas and flame-throwers by the British in combination with innovative tactics such as smoke. Andrew Robertshaw analyses the first day of the battle, explaining how British tactics developed as a result of the experience of the Somme, and provides an overview of the events along the entire front line, examining the actions of two British Corps, VIII at Serre and XIII at Montauban.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

“This brief account of that day, the first of a battle that would drag on for several months, sets the Somme in its larger context of World War I history. It explains the reasons for the disaster and discusses the British and German successes of that day. The book includes orders of battle for the BEF, French, and German units engaged, brief bibliography, and a description of the battlefield today.” —Thomas R. Kailbourn, Military Trader Magazine

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781846030383
Publisher:
Bloomsbury USA
Publication date:
05/30/2006
Series:
Campaign Series
Pages:
96
Sales rank:
747,887
Product dimensions:
7.28(w) x 9.80(h) x 0.32(d)

What People are saying about this

From the Publisher
"This brief account of that day, the first of a battle that would drag on for several months, sets the Somme in its larger context of World War I history. It explains the reasons for the disaster and discusses the British and German successes of that day. The book includes orders of battle for the BEF, French, and German units engaged, brief bibliography, and a description of the battlefield today." -Thomas R. Kailbourn, Military Trader Magazine

Meet the Author


Andrew Robertshaw is Director for Education at the National Army Museum and is currently working with Whitehall on their Household Cavalry museum project. He has presented numerous programmes on the First World War for the BBC and Channel 4; he is currently working on 'Finding the Fallen' for the Discovery Channel. In 1997 he published 'A Soldier's Life' (Heinemann/Penguin). He frequently lectures on battlefield archaeology and the First World War, and is Chair of 'No Man's Land', the European Group for First World War Archaeology. He lives in Surrey.

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