The Sonata Forms

The Sonata Forms

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by Charles Rosen
     
 

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"Nobody writes better about music .... again and again, unerring insight into just the features that make the music special and fine."—The New York Review of Books
Charles Rosen says of sonata form: "[It] is not a definite form like a minuet, a da capo aria, or a French overture; it is, like the fugue, a way of writing, a feeling for proportion,

Overview

"Nobody writes better about music .... again and again, unerring insight into just the features that make the music special and fine."—The New York Review of Books
Charles Rosen says of sonata form: "[It] is not a definite form like a minuet, a da capo aria, or a French overture; it is, like the fugue, a way of writing, a feeling for proportion, direction, and texture rather than a pattern."

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780393302196
Publisher:
Norton, W. W. & Company, Inc.
Publication date:
08/28/1988
Edition description:
Revised Edition
Pages:
432
Sales rank:
516,902
Product dimensions:
6.20(w) x 9.30(h) x 1.30(d)

Meet the Author

Charles Rosen, professor of music and social thought at the University of Chicago, has also taught at the State University of New York-Stony Brook and delivered the Charles Eliot Norton Lectures at Harvard University. His recitals and other performances have won the highest critical acclaim, as have his books, The Classical Style and The Romantic Generation. When he is not concertizing, Rosen lives in New York.

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The Sonata Forms 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Aaron745 More than 1 year ago
This book is essential for anyone wanting to take their understanding of "sonata form" beyond the basic classroom level. As equal parts performer, author, and theorist, Rosen does an eccelent job of explaining all sides of this suprisingly murky issue. He dismisses the generally accepted theory of sonata form as rather static, and shows that it in fact has endless variations. In addition, he follows its evolution from baroque binary form through the classical and romantic eras to a point at which the so-called form is recongnizable in name only. The book is extremely well written, and is appropriate and usefull for anyone with a serious interest in classical music.