A Song for My Sister

A Song for My Sister

by Lesley Simpson
     
 

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WAAAAA!  When Mira's wish for a sister at long last comes true, she's thrilled—but the new baby isn't exactly what she expected. Who knew someone so little could make so much noise! No matter what Mira or her parents do to soothe or amuse her, the baby's reaction is . . . WAAAAA!

On the day of her simchat bat, her Jewish naming ceremony, the baby

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Overview

WAAAAA!  When Mira's wish for a sister at long last comes true, she's thrilled—but the new baby isn't exactly what she expected. Who knew someone so little could make so much noise! No matter what Mira or her parents do to soothe or amuse her, the baby's reaction is . . . WAAAAA!

On the day of her simchat bat, her Jewish naming ceremony, the baby cries--as usual! That is, until Mira steps close to offer her own special gift and the inspiration for her parents' choice of the perfect name.

Lesley Simpson's tale of a family adjusting to a welcome change is sweet and sassy and very funny. It's a universal story about families and siblings, as well as a glimpse into a lovely Jewish ritual for welcoming baby girls to the family and the community.

Editorial Reviews

Kirkus Reviews
There is no specific Jewish ritual for naming a daughter, so many families invent their own. Simpson has invented an entire book to go with it. Wishes come true here, but not right on time. Mira wishes for a sister, and a baby is born four years later. Sound effects are important in this book. When Mira tosses coins into a wishing well, they go "Swish clink clank." The baby makes one noise, "Waaaaaaa!"--there are always seven as in a row. She cries when her parents try to feed her and when Mira bounces her or shows off her best cartwheel. The word "Waaaaaaa!" appears in bright red letters, and readers might get tired of seeing it on page after page, but then, that's the point. By the day of the naming ceremony, even the rabbi looks a little worn out. (Progressive readers will be happy to see that she's a female rabbi.) Mira, of course, saves the day, if not right on time. The book ends with the sounds of Jewish music, Mira singing "Dim-dim-dee-dee-dim" and her sister singing "Goo-goo-ga-ga-ga." Even young readers may see the plot twists coming, but the details are funny (Mira wants to name the baby Siren), the ending is genuinely moving, and some families may want to borrow the naming ritual for themselves. A neat melding of religious traditions into the familiar new-sibling story. (Picture book. 3-8)
Children's Literature - Amy McMillan
Mira wishes for a little brother or sister but when her wish finally comes true things aren't exactly the way she'd imagined them to be. Waiting for her naming day to give the baby a moniker, Mira comes up with a few suggestions in the interim. How about Siren? Or Thunder? After her ideas are kindly vetoed she gives up and joins with her bedraggled parents in doing everything she can think of to get the little one to stop crying. Cartwheels, bouncing, dancing, burping, not even underwear in Mira's ears can make the sound stop. When the rabbi begins the simchat bat the onlookers cover their ears but finally when the time comes for the singing Mira's song hushes the baby who then begins to gurgle along in a sisterly duet. Mom and Dad proclaim she will be named Shira, meaning song, and the two girls grow up singing together. The story serves as an introduction to some Jewish culture and terminology but the focus is the family relationship. Cheerful watercolor illustrations show rosy cheeked characters in a variety of familiar situations young readers will recognize and enjoy. Reviewer: Amy McMillan

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781582464275
Publisher:
Random House Children's Books
Publication date:
06/26/2012
Pages:
32
Product dimensions:
9.90(w) x 8.10(h) x 0.50(d)
Age Range:
4 - 7 Years

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