Song of Solomon

Overview

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1902 Excerpt: ... Until the day breah As in iii. 7 we must translate, Until the day cool and the shadows have fled, i. e. until the evening. This verse, by its transition to action on the part of one of the chief speakers, a thing that does not occur in the bridal was/, shews that we have not here a regular was/. Budde and ...
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Overview

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1902 Excerpt: ... Until the day breah As in iii. 7 we must translate, Until the day cool and the shadows have fled, i. e. until the evening. This verse, by its transition to action on the part of one of the chief speakers, a thing that does not occur in the bridal was/, shews that we have not here a regular was/. Budde and Bickell would consequently omit it. to the mountain 0/ myrrh, and to the hill of frankincense This is taken by Oettli to mean, 'I will get me into a garden of spices in hilly ground. He supposes that Solomon, thinking he has triumphed, says he will go away to a garden where he has planted exotic plants, and will return in the evening. This seems much preferable to the interpretations which find in these words allegorical references to the person of the bride. Cheyne would read Hermon for 'myrrh' (Heb. mor) and Lebanon for ' frankincense' (Heb. lebhonah). But no one could say that he was going on one afternoon to both Lebanon and Hermon, which is the highest peak 01 Anti-Libanus. The emendation would be feasible only if the whole complex of mountains were included in the name Lebanon. Chap. IV. 8--Chap. V. 1. A True Lover's Pleading. With 1.81 new song, representing another scene, begins. In it the peasant lover of the Shulammite comes to beseech her to flee from the mountain region where she is detained, the home of wild beasts and the scene of other dangers. In w. 9--15 he breaks forth into a passionate lyric, expressive of his love for her, and in v. 16 she replies, yielding to his love and his entreaties. Ch. v. 1 contains his reply. 8. The order of the words in the Heb. is specially emphatic, With me from Lebanon, O bride, with me from Lebanon do thou come. Evidently a contrast between the speaker and some other is here intended. Come with me, do not ...
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781289401795
  • Publisher: Nabu Press
  • Publication date: 9/9/2013
  • Pages: 166
  • Product dimensions: 7.44 (w) x 9.69 (h) x 0.35 (d)

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