Sonnets

Sonnets

by Charles Tomlinson
     
 

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Many of the earliest books, particularly those dating back to the 1900s and before, are now extremely scarce and increasingly expensive. We are republishing these classic works in affordable, high quality, modern editions, using the original text and artwork.See more details below

Overview

Many of the earliest books, particularly those dating back to the 1900s and before, are now extremely scarce and increasingly expensive. We are republishing these classic works in affordable, high quality, modern editions, using the original text and artwork.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
2940025424079
Publisher:
James Cornish and Sons ...
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
File size:
0 MB

Read an Excerpt


VII. A RETURN SONNET Addressed to Dr. E. J. Mills, F.R.S., ist January, 1875. As one whose duty calls him to survey A blinding waste of snow, or lifeless sand, Self-disciplined, he others may command, And toil with them in patience through the day ; And with the night see splendours far away, Bright gems in many a constellated band, The Aurora's coruscations o'er the land, Which e'en the desert clothe in fair array: So mid the chaos rival theories make, Where Nature scared, conceals her wondering face, There's one whose heresy we must excuse; Who upward lifts his eye for beauty's sake, Piercing dull Science through with living grace, He scorns the atoms but reveres the muse. VIII. MEN OF SCIENCE (Addressed to the Same). Gran, theurer Freund, ist alle Theorie Und grim des Leben; goldner Baum.—GiiTHE. O Friend ! we men of science often fail To catch from Nature an inspiring light; Systems may hide her grandeur from our sight, And sink her beauty 'neath minute detail. We lose her when hypotheses prevail; Modes of vibration and the atom's flight, We take for what we cannot read aright, Mere guesses at the truths behind the veil. We know no science but in Nature's laws ; What lies beyond 'tis useless to explore; Therefore 'twere wiser at the abyss to pause Nor seek with our frail means to bridge it o'er, Content to take the law in place of cause And own that mind can compass nothing more. IX. NATURE. Suchst du das Hochste, das Grosste? Die Pflanze kann es didi lehren : Was sie wissenlos ist, sey du es wollend,—das ist's. Gothe. Nature requires of us unswerving trust; 'Gainst her relentless laws we strive in vain : As well oppose the Brooklet to the main, Or to thelevelling hurricane the dust. Striving against t...

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